Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 57 items for

  • Author or Editor: Seung-Ki Kim x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Kyung Hyun Kim, Eun Hwa Choi and Seung-Ki Kim

Restricted access

Ho Jun Seol, Kyu-Chang Wang, Seung-Ki Kim, Yong-Seung Hwang, Ki Joong Kim and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

Patients with moyamoya disease complain of headache before surgery, after surgery, or in both periods. To clarify the pathophysiological features of these headaches which are one of the major symptoms in moyamoya disease after indirect bypass surgery, the authors reviewed data obtained in patients with moyamoya disease who underwent such surgery at their institute.

Methods

The authors surveyed 204 children with moyamoya disease younger than 17 years of age who underwent indirect bypass surgery consecutively between 1988 and 2000. If headache and associated symptoms disturbed their daily activity, required rest and/or medication, and occurred at least once a month, the headache was regarded as significant and the patient was included in the study. A postoperative headache was defined as the presence of significant headache 12 months after the operation or later. Preoperative headache was documented in 44 patients. Postoperative headache was observed in 63% (28 of 44) of the patients with preoperative headache and in 6.3% (10 of 160) of those without preoperative headache. Aggravation on postoperative magnetic resonance images or single-photon emission computerized tomography scans did not correlate with this symptom (p = 0.729 and 0.203, respectively). The clinical course had the following features: 1) a coexisting stage of headache and transient ischemic attack; 2) a second stage of headache only; and 3) a final stage of improvement or disappearance of headache.

Conclusions

The authors demonstrated that headaches can persist or develop after indirect bypass surgery despite successful prevention of cerebral ischemia. In addition to decreased cerebral blood flow, progressive recruitment and redistribution of blood flow should be considered as a cause of headaches in patients with moyamoya disease.

Restricted access

Jong-myung Jung, Seung-Jae Hyun, Ki-Jeong Kim and Tae-Ahn Jahng

OBJECTIVE

This study investigated the incidence and risk factors of rod fracture (RF) after multiple-rod constructs (MRCs) for adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery.

METHODS

A single-center, single-surgeon consecutive series of adult patients who underwent posterior thoracolumbar fusion at 4 or more levels using MRCs after osteotomy with at least 1 year of follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. Patient characteristics, radiological parameters, operative data, and clinical outcomes (on the Scoliosis Research Society-22r questionnaire) were analyzed at baseline and follow-up.

RESULTS

Seventy-six patients were enrolled in this study. RF occurred in 9 patients (11.8%), with all cases involving partial rod breakage. Seven patients (9.2%) underwent revision surgery. There were no significant differences in baseline demographic characteristics, radiological parameters, and surgical factors between the RF and non-RF groups. Multivariable analysis revealed that interbody fusion at the L5–S1 and L4–S1 levels could significantly reduce the occurrence of RF after MRCs for ASD (adjusted odds ratios 0.070 and 0.035, respectively). The RF group had significantly worse function score (mean 2.9 ± 0.8 vs 3.5 ± 0.7) and pain score (mean 2.8 ± 1.0 vs 3.5 ± 0.8) compared with the non-RF group at last visit.

CONCLUSIONS

RF occurred in 11.8% of patients with MRCs after ASD surgery. Most RFs occurred at the lumbosacral junction or adjacent level (77%). Interbody fusion at the lumbosacral junction (L5–S1 or L4–S1 level) could significantly prevent the occurrence of RF after MRCs for ASD.

Full access

Sang-Hyun Han, Seung-Jae Hyun, Tae-Ahn Jahng and Ki-Jeong Kim

Spontaneous bilateral pedicle fractures of the lumbar spine are rare, and an optimal surgical treatment has not been suggested. The authors report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with low-back pain and right leg radiating pain of 1 year’s duration. Radiological studies revealed a spontaneous bilateral pedicle fracture of L-5. All efforts at conservative treatment failed, and the patient underwent surgery for osteosynthesis of the fractured pedicle using bilateral pedicle screws connected with a bent rod. Her low-back and right leg pain were relieved postoperatively. A CT scan performed 3 months postoperatively revealed the disappearance of the pedicle fracture gap and presence of newly formed bony trabeculation. In rare cases of spontaneous bilateral pedicle fracture of the lumbar spine, osteosynthesis of the fractured pedicle using bilateral pedicle screws and a bent rod is a motion-preserving technique that may be an effective option when conservative management has failed.

Full access

Sanghyun Han, Seung-Jae Hyun, Ki-Jeong Kim, Tae-Ahn Jahng and Hyun-Jib Kim

OBJECTIVE

Posterior column osteotomy (PCO) has been known to provide an angular change (AC) of approximately 10° in sagittal plane deformity. However, whether PCO can actually obtain an AC of ≥ 10° depending on the particular level in the lumbar spine and which factors can effect a gain of ≥ 10° AC after PCO remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that effect a gain of ≥ 10° AC through PCO by comparing radiographic measurements between an AC group and a control group before and after adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery.

METHODS

Forty consecutive patients who underwent multilevel PCOs for ASD at a single institution between 2012 and 2016 were included in this study. PCO was performed in 142 disc space levels in the lumbar spine. The authors defined the disc space level that obtained ≥ 10° AC in the sagittal plane by PCO as the AC group and the remaining patients as controls. The modified Pfirrmann grade, surgical level, implementation of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and radiographic measurements were compared between the groups.

RESULTS

There were 67 levels in the AC group and 75 in the control group. Multivariate analysis identified the surgical level at L4–5 (OR 3.802, 95% CI 1.127–12.827, p = 0.031), performing TLIF with PCO (OR 3.303, 95% CI 1.258–8.674, p = 0.015), and a preoperative kyphotic disc space angle (OR 1.397, 95% CI 1.231–1.585, p < 0.001) as the factors that significantly effected ≥ 10° AC in the sagittal plane after PCO.

CONCLUSIONS

In ASD surgery, PCO cannot always achieve ≥ 10° AC in the sagittal plane. The factors that effected ≥ 10° AC in PCO for ASD were surgical level at L4–5, performing TLIF with PCO, and the preoperative kyphotic disc space angle.

Restricted access

Jae Hyo Park, Seung-Yeob Yang, You-Nam Chung, Jeong Eun Kim, Seung-Ki Kim, Dae Hee Han and Byung-Kyu Cho

✓The authors describe a modified technique of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) with bifrontal encephalogaleoperiosteal synangiosis (EGPS) and present the preliminary results of the procedure. Between January 2004 and June 2005 the authors performed modified EDAS with bifrontal EGPS in 17 patients with moyamoya disease. Surgical results were evaluated in terms of clinical outcomes, changes visible on neuroimages, extent of revascularization noted on angiograms, and hemodynamic changes demonstrated on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 21 months (mean 11.5 months). The overall clinical outcomes were excellent or good in 15 patients (88.2%) and poor in two (11.8%). The overall morbidity rate was 5.9% (one of 17 patients). Based on changes in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) territories after surgery, as shown on SPECT scans following administration of acetazolamide, 14 patients (82.4%) exhibited an improved vascular reserve capacity in both the ACA and MCA territories. It is the authors' opinion that wide covering of the cortex is necessary for sufficient revascularization. In the present study they demonstrate that modified EDAS with bifrontal EGPS is a safe and efficient surgical approach that covers not only the MCA territory but also the ACA territory.

Full access

Young-Seop Park, Seung-Jae Hyun, Ho Yong Choi, Ki-Jeong Kim and Tae-Ahn Jahng

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) fractures associated with UIV screw fixation (unicortical vs bicortical) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation after adult spinal deformity surgery.

METHODS

A single-center, single-surgeon consecutive series of adult patients who underwent lumbar fusion for ≥ 4 levels (that is, the lower instrumented vertebra at the sacrum or pelvis and the UIV of the thoracolumbar spine [T9–L2]) were retrospectively reviewed. Age, sex, follow-up duration, sagittal UIV angle immediately postoperatively including several balance-related parameters (lumbar lordosis [LL], pelvic incidence, and sagittal vertical axis), bone mineral density, UIV screw fixation type, UIV PMMA augmentation, and UIV fracture were evaluated. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group U, 15 patients with unicortical screw fixation at the UIV; Group P, 16 with bicortical screw fixation and PMMA augmentation at the UIV; and Group B, 21 with bicortical screw fixation without PMMA augmentation at the UIV.

RESULTS

The mean number of levels fused was 6.5 ± 2.5, 7.5 ± 2.5, and 6.5 ± 2.5; the median age was 50 ± 29, 72 ± 6, and 59 ± 24 years; and the mean follow-up was 31.5 ± 23.5, 13 ± 6, and 24 ± 17.5 months in Groups U, P, and B, respectively (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences in balance-related parameters (LL, sagittal vertical axis, pelvic incidence–LL, and so on) among the groups. UIV fracture rates in Groups U (0%), P (31.3%), and B (42.9%) increased in sequence by group (p = 0.006). UIV bicortical screw fixation increased the risk for UIV fracture (OR 5.39; p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Bicortical screw fixation at the UIV is a major risk factor for early UIV compression fracture, regardless of whether a thoracolumbosacral orthosis is used. To reduce the proximal junctional failure, unicortical screw fixation at the UIV is essential in adult spinal deformity correction surgery.

Restricted access

Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Yong-Seung Hwang, Ki Joong Kim, Jong Hee Chae, In-One Kim and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

Ideal epilepsy surgery would eliminate seizures without causing any functional deficits. The aim of the present study was to assess seizure outcomes and complications after epilepsy surgery in children with intractable epilepsy.

Methods

Data obtained in 134 children (75 boys and 59 girls) age 17 years or younger who underwent epilepsy surgery at Seoul National University Children's Hospital between 1993 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Epilepsy surgery included temporal resection (59 cases), extratemporal resection (56 cases), functional hemispherectomy (7 cases), callosotomy (9 cases), multiple subpial transection (1 case), and disconnection of a hamartoma (2 cases). The mean follow-up duration was 62.3 months (range 12–168 months).

Results

The overall seizure-free rate was 69% (93 of 134 cases). The seizure-free rate was significantly higher in children who underwent temporal resection than in those in whom extratemporal resection was performed (88 vs 55%, p < 0.05). The most frequent causes of treatment failure were related to the absence of structural abnormality demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging, development-associated disease, widespread disease documented by postoperative electroencephalography, and limited resection due to the presence of functional cortex. There were no postoperative deaths. Visual field defects were the most common complication after temporal resection (22% [13 of 59 cases]), whereas hemiparesis (mostly transient) was the most common morbidity after extratemporal resection (18% [10 of 56 cases]).

Conclusions

Epilepsy surgery is an effective and safe therapeutic modality in childhood. In children with extratemporal epilepsy, more careful interpretation of clinical and investigative data is needed to achieve favorable seizure outcome.

Full access

Chang-Hyun Lee, Jaebong Lee, James D. Kang, Seung-Jae Hyun, Ki-Jeong Kim, Tae-Ahn Jahng and Hyun-Jib Kim

OBJECT

Posterior cervical surgery, expansive laminoplasty (EL) or laminectomy followed by fusion (LF), is usually performed in patients with multilevel (≥ 3) cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, the superiority of either of these techniques is still open to debate. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and postoperative kyphosis in patients undergoing EL versus LF by performing a meta-analysis.

METHODS

Included in the meta-analysis were all studies of EL versus LF in adults with multilevel CSM in MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. A random-effects model was applied to pool data using the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, such as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) grade, the cervical curvature index (CCI), and the visual analog scale (VAS) score for neck pain.

RESULTS

Seven studies comprising 302 and 290 patients treated with EL and LF, respectively, were included in the final analyses. Both treatment groups showed slight cervical lordosis and moderate neck pain in the baseline state. Both groups were similarly improved in JOA grade (MD 0.09, 95% CI −0.37 to 0.54, p = 0.07) and neck pain VAS score (MD −0.33, 95% CI −1.50 to 0.84, p = 0.58). Both groups evenly lost cervical lordosis. In the LF group lordosis seemed to be preserved in long-term follow-up studies, although the difference between the 2 treatment groups was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Both EL and LF lead to clinical improvement and loss of lordosis evenly. There is no evidence to support EL over LF in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Any superiority between EL and LF remains in question, although the LF group shows favorable long-term results.