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Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Seok Ho Hong, Kyu-Chang Wang and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

Immature teratomas of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare neoplasms. Although adjuvant therapy is generally recommended after resection, the exact role of each therapeutic modality is not yet established. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinicopathological correlation and the role of resection to define the optimal treatment modalities for immature teratomas of the CNS.

Methods

Between 1987 and 2002, eight patients underwent radical surgery for a lesion diagnosed as a CNS immature teratoma at the authors' institution. The clinical courses of these patients and the pathological features of their tumors were retrospectively reviewed.

Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in six patients at the initial operation. The mean follow-up period was 75 months. Two patients received postoperative adjuvant therapies and two patients did not, against medical advice. None of the four patients experienced recurrence after long-term follow up. Another four patients, all of whom underwent GTR of the tumor, did not receive adjuvant therapy as part of a prospective treatment scheme. One of them exhibited early recurrence and metastasis. The tumor had pathological features denoting a high-grade (Norris Grade III) lesion and neurocytomatous differentiation.

Conclusions

Aggressive resection seems to be of utmost importance in the treatment of immature teratomas of the CNS. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be deferred if GTR is achieved in low-grade, immature teratomas, but adjuvant therapies may be warranted for high-grade ones.

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Jun-Hong Min, Byung-Joo Jung, Jee-Soo Jang, Seok-Kang Kim, Dae-Jin Jung and Sang-Ho Lee

The authors report the case of a 52-year-old man who had undergone resection of an ossified posterior longitudinal ligament via the anterior approach. The patient experienced postoperative neurological deterioration that may have been caused by a massive cord herniation associated with a dural defect at the corpectomy site.

Spinal cord herniation may develop as a complication of anterior cervical decompression. Surgeons should be alert to this condition when planning to treat cervical ossification of the ossified posterior longitudinal ligament via the anterior approach.

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Eun Mi Lee, Joong Koo Kang, Sang Joon Kim, Seok Ho Hong, Tae Sung Ko, Sang Ahm Lee, Do Heui Lee and Jung Kyo Lee

OBJECT

Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has proven efficacy in the treatment of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) and is comparable to conventional resective surgery. It may be effective as an alternative treatment to reoperation after failed temporal lobe surgery in patients with MTLE-HS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of GKRS in patients with unilateral MTLE-HS who did not achieve seizure control or had recurrent seizures after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL).

METHODS

Twelve patients (8 males; mean age 35.50 ± 9.90 years) with MTLE-HS who underwent GKRS after failed ATL (Engel Classes III–IV) were included. GKRS targets included the remnant tissue or adjacent regions of the previously performed ATL with a marginal dose of 24–25 Gy at the 50% isodose line in all patients. Final seizure outcome was assessed using Engel’s modified criteria during the final 2 years preceding data analysis. A comparison between signal changes on follow-up MRI and clinical outcome was performed.

RESULTS

All patients were followed up for at least 4 years with a mean duration of 6.18 ± 1.77 years (range 4–8.8 years) after GKRS. At the final assessment, 6 of 12 patients were classified as seizure free (Engel Class Ia, n = 3; Ic, n = 2; and Id, n = 1) and 6 patients were classified as not seizure free (Engel Class II, n = 1; III, n = 2; and IV, n = 3). Neither initial nor late MRI signal changes after GKRS statistically correlated with surgical outcome. Clinical seizure outcome did not differ significantly with initial or late MRI changes after GKRS.

CONCLUSIONS

GKRS can be considered an alternative option when the patients with MTLE-HS who had recurrent or residual seizures after ATL refuse a second operation.

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Eun Jung Lee, Jeong Hoon Kim, Eun Suk Park, Young-Hoon Kim, Jae Koo Lee, Seok Ho Hong, Young Hyun Cho and Chang Jin Kim

OBJECTIVE

Advances in neuroimaging techniques have led to the increased detection of asymptomatic intracranial meningiomas (IMs). Despite several studies on the natural history of IMs, a comprehensive evaluation method for estimating the growth potential of these tumors, based on the relative weight of each risk factor, has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a weighted scoring system that estimates the risk of rapid tumor growth to aid treatment decision making.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 232 patients with presumed IM who had been prospectively followed up in the absence of treatment from 1997 to 2013. Tumor volume was measured by imaging at each follow-up visit, and the growth rate was determined by regression analysis. Predictors of rapid tumor growth (defined as ≥ 2 cm3/year) were identified using a logistic regression model; each factor was awarded a score based on its own coefficient value. The probability (P) of rapid tumor growth was estimated using the following formula:

FD1

RESULTS

Fifty-nine tumors (25.4%) showed rapid growth. Tumor size (OR per cm3 1.07, p = 0.000), absence of calcification (OR 3.87, p = 0.004), peritumoral edema (OR 2.74, p = 0.025), and hyperintense or isointense signal on T2-weighted MRI (OR 3.76, p = 0.049) were predictors of tumor growth rate. In the Asan Intracranial Meningioma Scoring System (AIMSS), tumor size was categorized into 3 groups of < 2.5 cm, ≥ 2.5 to < 4.0 cm, and ≥ 4.0 cm in diameter and awarded a score of 0, 3, and 6, respectively; the parameters of calcification and peritumoral edema were categorized into 2 groups based on their presence or absence and given a score of 0 or 2 and 1 or 0, respectively; and the signal on T2-weighted MRI was categorized into 2 groups of hypointense and hyperintense/isointense and given a score of 0 or 2, respectively. The risk of rapid tumor growth was estimated to be < 10% when the total score was 0–2, 10%–50% when the total score was 3–6, and ≥ 50% when the total score was 7–11 (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, p = 0.9958). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.86.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors suggest a weighted scoring system (AIMSS) that predicts the specific probability of rapid tumor growth for patients with untreated IM. This scoring system will aid treatment decision making in clinical settings by screening out patients at high risk for rapid tumor growth.

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Chang Sub Lee, Seok Ho Hong, Kyu-Chang Wang, Seung-Ki Kim, Joong Shin Park, Jong-Kwan Jun, Bo Hyun Yoon, Young-Ho Lee, Son Moon Shin, Yeon Kyung Lee and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

The prognosis of fetal ventriculomegaly (FVM) varies because of the disease’s heterogeneity and the diversity of accompanying anomalies. Moreover, the cases that are referred to neurosurgeons may have different clinical features from those typically encountered by obstetricians. The object of this study was to delineate the prognosis of FVM in cases for which neurosurgical consultation was sought.

Methods

Forty-four cases of FVM that were diagnosed before birth and referred to neurosurgeons for prenatal consultation were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-five of the 44 patients had accompanying anomalies, but in only three (12%) of the cases were they detected prenatally. Postnatal imaging studies revealed that agenesis of the corpus callosum (nine cases) was the most common associated anomaly. Neuronal migration disorders, periventricular leukomalacia, and arachnoid cysts were present in four cases each, and aqueductal stenosis was present in three cases.

Thirty-three patients were followed up longer than 11 months; in 15 (45%) delayed cognitive and/or motor development was documented, and all had accompanying anomalies. All 10 of the patients with isolated FVM exhibited normal development during the follow-up period. Eleven (25%) of the 44 patients underwent neurosurgical interventions for ventriculomegaly, which included ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement in seven cases. Four patients (9%) died.

Conclusions

The authors conclude that delayed development and disturbed functional status in patients in whom FVM was diagnosed prenatally are closely related to the presence of certain accompanying anomalies. On postnatal examination, more than half of the patients in whom the diagnosis of FVM was based on ultrasonography findings and whose parents were offered prenatal neurosurgical consultation were found to have additional anomalies that were not detected prenatally. Because of the possibility of additional undiagnosed anomalies, consulting neurosurgeons should be cautious in giving a prognosis in cases of FVM, even when prenatal ultrasonography reveals isolated ventriculomegaly and tests for intrauterine infection and chromosomal abnormality yield negative results.

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Jaewoo Chung, Wonhyoung Park, Seok Ho Hong, Jung Cheol Park, Jae Sung Ahn, Byung Duk Kwun, Sang-Ahm Lee, Sung-Hoon Kim and Ji-Ye Jeon

OBJECTIVE

Somatosensory and motor evoked potentials (SEPs and MEPs) are often used to prevent ischemic complications during aneurysm surgeries. However, surgeons often encounter cases with suspicious false-positive and false-negative results from intraoperative evoked potential (EP) monitoring, but the incidence and possible causes for these results are not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and reliability of EP monitoring in the microsurgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms by evaluating false-positive and false-negative cases.

METHODS

From January 2012 to April 2016, 1514 patients underwent surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) with EP monitoring at the authors’ institution. An EP amplitude decrease of 50% or greater compared with the baseline amplitude was defined as a significant EP change. Correlations between immediate postoperative motor weakness and EP monitoring results were retrospectively reviewed. The authors calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of intraoperative MEP monitoring, as well as the incidence of false-positive and false-negative results.

RESULTS

Eighteen (1.19%) of the 1514 patients had a symptomatic infarction, and 4 (0.26%) had a symptomatic hemorrhage. A total of 15 patients showed motor weakness, with the weakness detected on the immediate postoperative motor function test in 10 of these cases. Fifteen false-positive cases (0.99%) and 8 false-negative cases (0.53%) were reported. Therefore, MEP during UIA surgery resulted in a sensitivity of 0.10, specificity of 0.94, positive predictive value of 0.01, and negative predictive value of 0.99.

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative EP monitoring has high specificity and negative predictive value. Both false-positive and false-negative findings were present. However, it is likely that a more meticulously designed protocol will make EP monitoring a better surrogate indicator of possible ischemic neurological deficits.

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Tae Hoon Roh, Seok-Gu Kang, Ju Hyung Moon, Kyoung Su Sung, Hun Ho Park, Se Hoon Kim, Eui Hyun Kim, Chang-Ki Hong, Chang-Ok Suh and Jong Hee Chang

OBJECTIVE

Following resection of glioblastoma (GBM), microscopic remnants of the GBM tumor remaining in nearby tissue cause tumor recurrence more often than for other types of tumors, even after gross-total resection (GTR). Although surgical oncologists traditionally resect some of the surrounding normal tissue, whether further removal of nearby tissue may improve survival in GBM patients is unknown. In this single-center retrospective study, the authors assessed whether lobectomy confers a survival benefit over GTR without lobectomy when treating GBMs in the noneloquent area.

METHODS

The authors selected 40 patients who had undergone GTR of a histopathologically diagnosed isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)–wild type GBM in the right frontal or temporal lobe and divided the patients into 2 groups according to whether GTR of the tumor involved lobectomy, defined as a supratotal resection (SupTR group, n = 20) or did not (GTR group, n = 20). Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scores were compared between groups (p ≤ 0.05 for statistically significant differences).

RESULTS

The median postoperative PFS times for each group were as follows: GTR group, 11.5 months (95% CI 8.8–14.2) and SupTR group, 30.7 months (95% CI 4.3–57.1; p = 0.007). The median postoperative OS times for each group were as follows: GTR group, 18.7 months (95% CI 14.3–23.1) and SupTR group, 44.1 months (95% CI 25.1–63.1; p = 0.040). The mean postoperative KPS scores (GTR, 76.5; SupTR, 77.5; p = 0.904) were not significantly different. In multivariate analysis, survival for the SupTR group was significantly longer than that for the GTR group in terms of both PFS (HR 0.230; 95% CI 0.090–0.583; p = 0.002) and OS (HR 0.247; 95% CI 0.086–0.704; p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

In cases of completely resectable, noneloquent-area GBMs, SupTR provides superior PFS and OS without negatively impacting patient performance.