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  • Author or Editor: Sebastien Ourselin x
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Vejay N. Vakharia, Roman Rodionov, Andrew W. McEvoy, Anna Miserocchi, Rachel Sparks, Aidan G. O’Keeffe, Sebastien Ourselin and John S. Duncan

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to implement cumulative summation (CUSUM) analysis as an early-warning detection and quality assurance system for preclinical testing of the iSYS1 novel robotic trajectory guidance system.

METHODS

Anatomically accurate 3D-printed skull phantoms were created for 3 patients who underwent implantation of 21 stereoelectroencephalography electrodes by surgeons using the current standard of care (frameless technique). Implantation schema were recreated using the iSYS1 system, and paired accuracy measures were compared with the previous frameless implantations. Entry point, target point, and implantation angle accuracy were measured on postimplantation CT scans. CUSUM analysis was undertaken prospectively.

RESULTS

The iSYS1 trajectory guidance system significantly improved electrode entry point accuracies from 1.90 ± 0.96 mm (mean ± SD) to 0.76 ± 0.57 mm (mean ± SD) without increasing implantation risk. CUSUM analysis was successful as a continuous measure of surgical performance and acted as an early-warning detection system. The surgical learning curve, although minimal, showed improvement after insertion of the eighth electrode.

CONCLUSIONS

The iSYS1 trajectory guidance system did not show any increased risk during phantom preclinical testing when used by neurosurgeons who had no experience with its use. CUSUM analysis is a simple technique that can be applied to all stages of the IDEAL (idea, development, exploration, assessment) framework as an extra patient safety mechanism. Further clinical trials are required to prove the efficacy of the device.

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Mark Nowell, Rachel Sparks, Gergely Zombori, Anna Miserocchi, Roman Rodionov, Beate Diehl, Tim Wehner, Gianluca Baio, Gianluca Trevisi, Martin Tisdall, Sebastien Ourselin, Andrew W. McEvoy and John Duncan

OBJECT

The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of multitrajectory computer-assisted planning software (CAP) to plan stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) electrode arrangements.

METHODS

A cohort of 18 patients underwent SEEG for evaluation of epilepsy at a single center between August 2013 and August 2014. Planning of electrodes was performed manually and stored using EpiNav software. CAP was developed as a planning tool in EpiNav. The user preselects a set of cerebral targets and optimized trajectory constraints, and then runs an automated search of potential scalp entry points and associated trajectories. Each trajectory is associated with metrics for a safety profile, derived from the minimal distance to vascular structures, and an efficacy profile, derived from the proportion of depth electrodes that are within or adjacent to gray matter. CAP was applied to the cerebral targets used in the cohort of 18 previous manually planned implantations to generate new multitrajectory implantation plans. A comparison was then undertaken for trajectory safety and efficacy.

RESULTS

CAP was applied to 166 electrode targets in 18 patients. There were significant improvements in both the safety profile and efficacy profile of trajectories generated by CAP compared with manual planning (p < 0.05). Three independent neurosurgeons assessed the feasibility of the trajectories generated by CAP, with 131 (78.9%) of 166 trajectories deemed suitable for implementation in clinical practice. CAP was performed in real time, with a median duration of 8 minutes for each patient, although this does not include the time taken for data preparation.

CONCLUSIONS

CAP is a promising tool to plan SEEG implantations. CAP provides feasible depth electrode arrangements, with quantitatively greater safety and efficacy profiles, and with a substantial reduction in duration of planning within the 3D multimodality framework.

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Vejay N. Vakharia, Rachel Sparks, Roman Rodionov, Sjoerd B. Vos, Christian Dorfer, Jonathan Miller, Daniel Nilsson, Martin Tisdall, Stefan Wolfsberger, Andrew W. McEvoy, Anna Miserocchi, Gavin P. Winston, Aidan G. O’Keeffe, Sebastien Ourselin and John S. Duncan

OBJECTIVE

One-third of cases of focal epilepsy are drug refractory, and surgery might provide a cure. Seizure-free outcome after surgery depends on the correct identification and resection of the epileptogenic zone. In patients with no visible abnormality on MRI, or in cases in which presurgical evaluation yields discordant data, invasive stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) recordings might be necessary. SEEG is a procedure in which multiple electrodes are placed stereotactically in key targets within the brain to record interictal and ictal electrophysiological activity. Correlating this activity with seizure semiology enables identification of the seizure-onset zone and key structures within the ictal network. The main risk related to electrode placement is hemorrhage, which occurs in 1% of patients who undergo the procedure. Planning safe electrode placement for SEEG requires meticulous adherence to the following: 1) maximize the distance from cerebral vasculature, 2) avoid crossing sulcal pial boundaries (sulci), 3) maximize gray matter sampling, 4) minimize electrode length, 5) drill at an angle orthogonal to the skull, and 6) avoid critical neurological structures. The authors provide a validation of surgical strategizing and planning with EpiNav, a multimodal platform that enables automated computer-assisted planning (CAP) for electrode placement with user-defined regions of interest.

METHODS

Thirteen consecutive patients who underwent implantation of a total 116 electrodes over a 15-month period were studied retrospectively. Models of the cortex, gray matter, and sulci were generated from patient-specific whole-brain parcellation, and vascular segmentation was performed on the basis of preoperative MR venography. Then, the multidisciplinary implantation strategy and precise trajectory planning were reconstructed using CAP and compared with the implemented manually determined plans. Paired results for safety metric comparisons were available for 104 electrodes. External validity of the suitability and safety of electrode entry points, trajectories, and target-point feasibility was sought from 5 independent, blinded experts from outside institutions.

RESULTS

CAP-generated electrode trajectories resulted in a statistically significant improvement in electrode length, drilling angle, gray matter–sampling ratio, minimum distance from segmented vasculature, and risk (p < 0.05). The blinded external raters had various opinions of trajectory feasibility that were not statistically significant, and they considered a mean of 69.4% of manually determined trajectories and 62.2% of CAP-generated trajectories feasible; 19.4% of the CAP-generated electrode-placement plans were deemed feasible when the manually determined plans were not, whereas 26.5% of the manually determined electrode-placement plans were rated feasible when CAP-determined plans were not (no significant difference).

CONCLUSIONS

CAP generates clinically feasible electrode-placement plans and results in statistically improved safety metrics. CAP is a useful tool for automating the placement of electrodes for SEEG; however, it requires the operating surgeon to review the results before implantation, because only 62% of electrode-placement plans were rated feasible, compared with 69% of the manually determined placement plans, mainly because of proximity of the electrodes to unsegmented vasculature. Improved vascular segmentation and sulcal modeling could lead to further improvements in the feasibility of CAP-generated trajectories.

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Vejay N. Vakharia, Rachel Sparks, Roman Rodionov, Sjoerd B. Vos, Christian Dorfer, Jonathan Miller, Daniel Nilsson, Martin Tisdall, Stefan Wolfsberger, Andrew W. McEvoy, Anna Miserocchi, Gavin P. Winston, Aidan G. O’Keeffe, Sebastien Ourselin and John S. Duncan

OBJECTIVE

One-third of cases of focal epilepsy are drug refractory, and surgery might provide a cure. Seizure-free outcome after surgery depends on the correct identification and resection of the epileptogenic zone. In patients with no visible abnormality on MRI, or in cases in which presurgical evaluation yields discordant data, invasive stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) recordings might be necessary. SEEG is a procedure in which multiple electrodes are placed stereotactically in key targets within the brain to record interictal and ictal electrophysiological activity. Correlating this activity with seizure semiology enables identification of the seizure-onset zone and key structures within the ictal network. The main risk related to electrode placement is hemorrhage, which occurs in 1% of patients who undergo the procedure. Planning safe electrode placement for SEEG requires meticulous adherence to the following: 1) maximize the distance from cerebral vasculature, 2) avoid crossing sulcal pial boundaries (sulci), 3) maximize gray matter sampling, 4) minimize electrode length, 5) drill at an angle orthogonal to the skull, and 6) avoid critical neurological structures. The authors provide a validation of surgical strategizing and planning with EpiNav, a multimodal platform that enables automated computer-assisted planning (CAP) for electrode placement with user-defined regions of interest.

METHODS

Thirteen consecutive patients who underwent implantation of a total 116 electrodes over a 15-month period were studied retrospectively. Models of the cortex, gray matter, and sulci were generated from patient-specific whole-brain parcellation, and vascular segmentation was performed on the basis of preoperative MR venography. Then, the multidisciplinary implantation strategy and precise trajectory planning were reconstructed using CAP and compared with the implemented manually determined plans. Paired results for safety metric comparisons were available for 104 electrodes. External validity of the suitability and safety of electrode entry points, trajectories, and target-point feasibility was sought from 5 independent, blinded experts from outside institutions.

RESULTS

CAP-generated electrode trajectories resulted in a statistically significant improvement in electrode length, drilling angle, gray matter–sampling ratio, minimum distance from segmented vasculature, and risk (p < 0.05). The blinded external raters had various opinions of trajectory feasibility that were not statistically significant, and they considered a mean of 69.4% of manually determined trajectories and 62.2% of CAP-generated trajectories feasible; 19.4% of the CAP-generated electrode-placement plans were deemed feasible when the manually determined plans were not, whereas 26.5% of the manually determined electrode-placement plans were rated feasible when CAP-determined plans were not (no significant difference).

CONCLUSIONS

CAP generates clinically feasible electrode-placement plans and results in statistically improved safety metrics. CAP is a useful tool for automating the placement of electrodes for SEEG; however, it requires the operating surgeon to review the results before implantation, because only 62% of electrode-placement plans were rated feasible, compared with 69% of the manually determined placement plans, mainly because of proximity of the electrodes to unsegmented vasculature. Improved vascular segmentation and sulcal modeling could lead to further improvements in the feasibility of CAP-generated trajectories.

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Roman Rodionov, Aidan O’Keeffe, Mark Nowell, Michele Rizzi, Vejay N. Vakharia, Victoria Wykes, Sofia H. Eriksson, Anna Miserocchi, Andrew W. McEvoy, Sebastien Ourselin and John S. Duncan

OBJECTIVE

The accuracy of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) electrode implantation is an important factor in maximizing its safety. The authors established a quality assurance (QA) process to aid advances in implantation accuracy.

METHODS

The accuracy of three consecutive modifications of a frameless implantation technique was quantified in three cohorts comprising 22, 8, and 23 consecutive patients. The modifications of the technique aimed to increase accuracy of the bolt placement.

RESULTS

The lateral shift of the axis of the implanted bolt at the level of the planned entry point was reduced from a mean of 3.0 ± 1.6 mm to 1.4 ± 0.8 mm. The lateral shift of the axis of the implanted bolt at the level of the planned target point was reduced from a mean of 3.8 ± 2.5 mm to 1.6 ± 0.9 mm.

CONCLUSIONS

This QA framework helped to isolate and quantify the factors introducing inaccuracy in SEEG implantation, and to monitor ongoing accuracy and the effect of technique modifications.