Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for

  • Author or Editor: Se Jin Park x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Jin-Sung Park, Se-Jun Park, Chong-Suh Lee, Tae-hoon Yum, and Bo-Taek Kim

OBJECTIVE

Several radiological parameters related to the aging spine have been reported as progression factors of early degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS). However, it has not been determined which factors are the most important. In this study the authors aimed to determine the risk factors associated with curve progression in early DLS.

METHODS

Fifty-one patients with early DLS and Cobb angles of 5°–15° were investigated. In total, 7 men and 44 women (mean age 61.6 years) were observed for a mean period of 13.7 years. The subjects were divided into two groups according to Cobb angle progression (≥ 15° or < 15°) at the final follow-up, and radiological parameters were compared. The direction of scoliosis, apical vertebral level and rotational grade, lateral subluxation, disc space difference, osteophyte difference, upper and lower disc wedging angles, and relationship between the intercrest line and L5 vertebra were evaluated.

RESULTS

During the follow-up period, the mean curve progression increased from 8.8° ± 3.2° to 19.4° ± 8.9°. The Cobb angle had progressed by ≥ 15° in 17 patients (33.3%) at the final follow-up. In these patients the mean Cobb angle increased from 9.4° ± 3.4° to 28.8° ± 7.5°, and in the 34 remaining patients it increased from 8.5° ± 3.1° to 14.7° ± 4.8°. The baseline lateral subluxation, disc space difference, and upper and lower disc wedging angles significantly differed between the groups. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only the upper and lower disc wedging angles were significantly correlated with curve progression (OR 1.55, p = 0.035, and OR 1.89, p = 0.004, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Asymmetrical degenerative change in the lower apical vertebral disc, which leads to upper and lower disc wedging angles, is the most substantial factor in predicting early DLS progression.

Free access

Chong-Suh Lee, Jin-Sung Park, Yunjin Nam, Youn-Taek Choi, and Se-Jun Park

OBJECTIVE

It has been well documented that optimal sagittal alignment is highly correlated with good clinical outcomes in adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. However, it remains to be determined whether the clinical benefit of appropriately corrected sagittal alignment can be maintained in the long term. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether appropriately corrected sagittal alignment continues to offer benefits over time with regard to clinical outcomes and mechanical failure.

METHODS

Patients older than 50 years who underwent ≥ 4-level fusion for ASD and were followed up for ≥ 5 years were included in this study. Appropriateness of sagittal alignment correction was defined as pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis ≤ 10°, pelvic tilt ≤ 25°, and sagittal vertical axis ≤ 50 mm. Two groups were created based on this appropriateness: group A (appropriate) and group IA (inappropriate). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire–22 (SRS-22). The development of mechanical failures, such as rod fracture and proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK), was compared between the two groups.

RESULTS

The study included 90 patients with a follow-up duration of 90.3 months. There were 30 patients in group A and 60 patients in group IA. The clinical outcomes at 2 years were significantly better in group A than in group IA in terms of the VAS scores, ODI scores, and all domains of SRS-22. At the final follow-up visit, back VAS and ODI scores were still lower in group A than they were in group IA, but the VAS score for leg pain did not differ between the groups. The SRS-22 score at the final follow-up showed that only the pain and self-image/appearance domains and the total sum were significantly higher in group A than in group IA. The incidence of rod fracture and PJK did not differ between the two groups. The rate of revision surgery for rod fracture or PJK was also similar between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS

The clinical benefits from appropriate correction of sagittal alignment continued for a mean of 90.3 months. However, the intergroup difference in clinical outcomes between groups A and IA decreased over time. The development of rod fracture or PJK was not affected by the appropriateness of sagittal alignment.

Free access

Jin-Sung Park, Se-Jun Park, Chong-Suh Lee, Tae-hoon Yum, and Bo-Taek Kim

OBJECTIVE

Several radiological parameters related to the aging spine have been reported as progression factors of early degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS). However, it has not been determined which factors are the most important. In this study the authors aimed to determine the risk factors associated with curve progression in early DLS.

METHODS

Fifty-one patients with early DLS and Cobb angles of 5°–15° were investigated. In total, 7 men and 44 women (mean age 61.6 years) were observed for a mean period of 13.7 years. The subjects were divided into two groups according to Cobb angle progression (≥ 15° or < 15°) at the final follow-up, and radiological parameters were compared. The direction of scoliosis, apical vertebral level and rotational grade, lateral subluxation, disc space difference, osteophyte difference, upper and lower disc wedging angles, and relationship between the intercrest line and L5 vertebra were evaluated.

RESULTS

During the follow-up period, the mean curve progression increased from 8.8° ± 3.2° to 19.4° ± 8.9°. The Cobb angle had progressed by ≥ 15° in 17 patients (33.3%) at the final follow-up. In these patients the mean Cobb angle increased from 9.4° ± 3.4° to 28.8° ± 7.5°, and in the 34 remaining patients it increased from 8.5° ± 3.1° to 14.7° ± 4.8°. The baseline lateral subluxation, disc space difference, and upper and lower disc wedging angles significantly differed between the groups. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only the upper and lower disc wedging angles were significantly correlated with curve progression (OR 1.55, p = 0.035, and OR 1.89, p = 0.004, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Asymmetrical degenerative change in the lower apical vertebral disc, which leads to upper and lower disc wedging angles, is the most substantial factor in predicting early DLS progression.

Restricted access

Jin-Sung Park, Chong-Suh Lee, Youn-Taek Choi, and Se-Jun Park

OBJECTIVE

Three-column osteotomies (3COs) for surgical correction of lumbar kyphosis show a strong correction capacity, but this procedure carries high morbidity rates. The anterior column release (ACR) technique was developed as a less invasive procedure. In this study the authors aimed to evaluate sagittal alignment restoration using ACR and to determine factors that affect the degree of correction.

METHODS

This study included 36 patients (68 cases) who underwent ACR of more than one level for adult spinal deformity. Parameters for regional sagittal alignment included segmental lordosis (SL). The parameters for global sagittal alignment included pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, and sagittal vertical axis (SVA). In addition, the interdiscal height (IDH) and difference of interdiscal angle (DIDA) were measured to evaluate the stiffness of the vertebra segment. The changes in SL were evaluated after ACR and the change of global sagittal alignment was also determined. Factors such as the location of the ACR level, IDH, DIDA, cage height, and additional posterior column osteotomy (PCO) were analyzed for correlation with the degree of SL correction.

RESULTS

Thirty-six patients were included in this study. A total of 68 levels were operated with the ACR (8 levels at L2–3, 27 levels at L3–4, and 33 levels at L4–5). ACR was performed for 1 level in 10 patients, 2 levels in 20, and 3 levels in 6 patients (mean 1.9 ± 0.7 levels per patient). Mean follow-up duration was 27.1 ± 4.2 months. The mean SL of the total segment was 0.4° ± 7.2° preoperatively and increased by 15.3° ± 5.5° at the last follow-up (p < 0.001); thus, the mean increase of SL was 14.9° ± 8.1° per one ACR. Global sagittal alignment was also improved following SL restoration with SVA from 101.9 mm to 31.4 mm. The degree of SL correction was correlated with the location of ACR level (p = 0.041) and was not correlated with IDH, DIDA, cage height and additional PCO.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrated that the mean correction angle of SL was 14.9 per one ACR. The degree of disc space collapse and stiffness of segment did not affect the degree of correction by ACR.

Restricted access

Aditya Raj, Chong-Suh Lee, Jin-Sung Park, Byeong-Jik Kang, Tae Soo Shin, and Se-Jun Park

OBJECTIVE

Score on the proximal junctional kyphosis severity scale (PJKSS) has been validated to show good correlations with likelihood of revision surgery for proximal junctional failure (PJF) after surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD). However, if the patient has progressive neurological deterioration, revision surgery should be considered regardless of severity based on PJKSS score. This study aimed to revalidate the correlation of PJKSS score with likelihood of revision surgery in patients with PJF but without neurological deficit. In addition, the authors provide the cutoff score on PJKSS that indicates need for revision surgery.

METHODS

A retrospective study was performed. Among 360 patients who underwent fusion of more than 4 segments including the sacrum, 83 patients who developed PJF without acute neurological deficit were included. Thirty patients underwent revision surgery (R group) and 53 patients did not undergo revision surgery (NR group). All components of PJKSS and variables other than those included in PJKSS were compared between groups. The cutoff score on PJKSS that indicated need for revision surgery was calculated with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed to identify which variables were most predictive of revision surgery.

RESULTS

The mean patient age at the time of index surgery was 69.4 years, and the mean fusion length was 6.1 segments. All components of PJKSS, such as focal pain, instrumentation problem, change in kyphosis, fracture at the uppermost instrumented vertebra (UIV)/UIV+1, and level of UIV, were significantly different between groups. The average total PJKSS score was significantly greater in the R group than in the NR group (6.0 vs 3.9, p < 0.001). The calculated cutoff score was 4.5, with 70% sensitivity and specificity. There were no significant between-group differences in patient, surgical, and radiographic factors (other than the PJKSS components). Three factors were significantly associated with revision surgery on multivariate analysis: instrumentation problem (OR 8.160, p = 0.004), change in kyphosis (OR 4.809, p = 0.026), and UIV/UIV+1 fracture (OR 6.462, p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

PJKSS score positively predicted need for revision surgery in patients with PJF who were neurologically intact. The calculated cutoff score on PJKSS that indicated need for revision surgery was 4.5, with 70% sensitivity and specificity. The factor most responsible for revision surgery was bony failure with > 20° focal kyphotic deformity. Therefore, early revision surgery should be considered for these patients even in the absence of neurological deficit.

Restricted access

Dae-Woong Ham, Ho-Joong Kim, Sang-Min Park, Se Jin Park, Jiwon Park, and Jin S. Yeom

OBJECTIVE

Changes in the thoracolumbar angle (TLA) would play a pivotal role in the reciprocal changes following spine realignment surgery, thereby leading to the development of proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK). This study aimed to investigate the association between TLA and the development of PJK following adult spinal deformity surgery.

METHODS

A total of 107 patients were divided into PJK+ and PJK− groups according to the development of PJK within 12 months after surgery. The TLA and spinopelvic radiological parameters were compared between the PJK+ and PJK− groups. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the risk factors for PJK. The receiver operating characteristic curves of the regression models were used to investigate the cutoff values of significant parameters needed so that PJK would not occur.

RESULTS

The change in TLA (ΔTLA) in the PJK+ group was significantly larger than in the PJK− group (6.7° ± 7.9° and 2.2° ± 8.1°, respectively; p = 0.006). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that age, postoperative pelvic incidence–lumbar lordosis, and ΔTLA were significant risk factors for PJK. The risk of developing PJK was higher when the postoperative pelvic incidence–lumbar lordosis was < 5.2 and the ΔTLA was > 3.58°.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study highlights the thinking that extensive correction of TLA and lumbar lordosis should be avoided in patients with adult spinal deformity. Overcorrection of TLA of > 3.58° could result in higher odds of PJK.

Restricted access

Se-Jun Park, Keun-Ho Lee, Chong-Suh Lee, Joon Young Jung, Jin Ho Park, Gab-Lae Kim, and Ki-Tack Kim

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and clinical results of instrumentation surgery without fusion for metastases to the spine.

METHODS

Between 2010 and 2017, patients with spinal tumors who underwent instrumentation without fusion surgery were consecutively evaluated. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data were evaluated. Data were inclusive for last follow-up and just prior to death if the patient died. Instrumentation-related complications included screw migration, screw or rod breakage, cage migration, and screw loosening.

RESULTS

Excluding patients who died within 6 months, a total of 136 patients (140 operations) were recruited. The average follow-up duration was 16.5 months (median 12.4 months). The pain visual analog scale score decreased from 6.4 to 2.5 (p < 0.001) and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale score improved (p < 0.001). There were only 3 cases (2.1%) of symptomatic instrumentation-related complications that resulted in revisions. There were 6 cases of nonsymptomatic complications. The most common complication was screw migration or pull-out (5 cases). There were 3 cases of screw or rod breakage and 1 case of cage migration. Two-thirds of the cases of instrumentation-related complications occurred after 6 months, with a mean postoperative period of 1 year.

CONCLUSIONS

The current study reported successful outcomes with very low complication rates after nonfusion surgery for patients with spinal metastases, even among those who survived for more than 6 months. More than half of the instrumentation-related complications were asymptomatic and did not require revision. The results suggest that nonfusion surgery might be sufficient for a majority of patients with spinal metastases.

Restricted access

Se-Jun Park, Chong-Suh Lee, Jin-Sung Park, Tae-Hoon Yum, Tae Soo Shin, Ji-Woo Chang, and Keun-Ho Lee

OBJECTIVE

Iliac screw fixation and anterior column support are highly recommended to prevent lumbosacral pseudarthrosis after long-level adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. Despite modern instrumentation techniques, a considerable number of patients still experience nonunion at the lumbosacral junction. However, most previous studies evaluating nonunion relied only on plain radiographs and only assessed when the implant failures occurred. Therefore, using CT, it is important to know the prevalence after iliac fixation and to evaluate risk factors for nonunion at L5–S1.

METHODS

Seventy-seven patients who underwent ≥ 4-level fusion to the sacrum using iliac screws for ASD and completed a 2-year postoperative CT scan were included in the present study. All L5–S1 segments were treated by interbody fusion. Lumbosacral fusion status was evaluated on 2-year postoperative CT scans using Brantigan, Steffee, and Fraser criteria. Risk factors for nonunion were analyzed using patient, surgical, and radiographic factors. The metal failure and its association with fusion status at L5–S1 were evaluated.

RESULTS

Of the 77 patients, 12 (15.6%) showed nonunion at the lumbosacral junction on the 2-year CT scans. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression revealed that only higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade was a risk factor for nonunion (OR 25.6, 95% CI 3.196–205.048, p = 0.002). There were no radiographic parameters associated with fusion status at L5–S1. Lumbosacral junction rod fracture occurred more frequently in patients with nonunion than in patients with fusion (33.3% vs 6.2%, p = 0.038).

CONCLUSIONS

Although iliac screw fixation and anterior column support have been performed to prevent lumbosacral nonunion during ASD surgery, 15.6% of patients still showed nonunion on 2-year postoperative CT scans. High ASA grade was a significant risk factor for nonunion. Rod fracture between L5 and S1 occurred more frequently in the nonunion group.

Restricted access

Hun Ho Park, Jihwan Yoo, Hyeong-Cheol Oh, Yoon Jin Cha, Se Hoon Kim, Chang-Ki Hong, and Kyu-Sung Lee

OBJECTIVE

The role of adjuvant radiation therapy following incomplete resection of WHO grade I skull base meningiomas (SBMs) is controversial, and little is known regarding the behavior of residual tumors. The authors investigated the factors that influence regrowth of residual WHO grade I SBMs following incomplete resection.

METHODS

From 2005 to 2019, a total of 710 patients underwent surgery for newly diagnosed WHO grade I SBMs. The data of 115 patients (16.2%) with incomplete resection and without any adjuvant radiotherapy were retrospectively assessed during a mean follow-up of 78 months (range 27–198 months). Pre-, intra-, and postoperative clinical and molecular factors were analyzed for relevance to regrowth-free survival (RFS).

RESULTS

Eighty patients were eligible for analysis, excluding those who were lost to follow-up (n = 10) or had adjuvant radiotherapy (n = 25). Regrowth occurred in 39 patients (48.7%), with a mean RFS of 50 months (range 3–191 months). Significant predictors of regrowth were Ki-67 proliferative index (PI) ≥ 4% (p = 0.017), Simpson resection grades IV and V (p = 0.005), and invasion of the cavernous sinus (p = 0.027) and Meckel’s cave (p = 0.027). After Cox regression analysis, only Ki-67 PI ≥ 4% (hazard ratio [HR] 9.39, p = 0.003) and Simpson grades IV and V (HR 8.65, p = 0.001) showed significant deterioration of RFS. When stratified into 4 scoring groups, the mean RFSs were 110, 70, 38, and 9 months for scores 1 (Ki-67 PI < 4% and Simpson grade III), 2 (Ki-67 PI < 4% and Simpson grades IV and V), 3 (Ki-67 PI ≥ 4% and Simpson grade III), and 4 (Ki-67 PI ≥ 4% and Simpson grades IV and V), respectively. RFS was significantly longer for score 1 versus scores 2–4 (p < 0.01). Tumor consistency, histology, location, peritumoral edema, vascular encasement, and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation had no impact on regrowth.

CONCLUSIONS

Ki-67 PI and Simpson resection grade showed significant associations with RFS for WHO grade I SBMs following incomplete resection. Ki-67 PI and Simpson resection grade could be utilized to stratify the level of risk for regrowth.

Full access

Hyungseok Seo, Eugene Kim, Haesun Jung, Young-Jin Lim, Jin Wook Kim, Chul-Kee Park, Young-Bem Se, Young-Tae Jeon, Jung-Won Hwang, and Hee-Pyoung Park

OBJECTIVE

Mannitol is used intraoperatively to induce brain relaxation in patients undergoing supratentorial brain tumor resection. The authors sought to determine the dose of mannitol that provides adequate brain relaxation with the fewest adverse effects.

METHODS

A total of 124 patients were randomized to receive mannitol at 0.25 g/kg (Group A), 0.5 g/kg (Group B), 1.0 g/kg (Group C), and 1.5 g/kg (Group D). The degree of brain relaxation was classified according to a 4-point scale (1, bulging; 2, firm; 3, adequate; and 4, perfectly relaxed) by neurosurgeons; Classes 3 and 4 were considered to indicate satisfactory brain relaxation. The osmolality gap (OG) and serum electrolytes were measured before and after mannitol administration.

RESULTS

The brain relaxation score showed an increasing trend in patients receiving higher doses of mannitol (p = 0.005). The incidence of satisfactory brain relaxation was higher in Groups C and D than in Group A (67.7% and 64.5% vs 32.2%, p = 0.011 and 0.022, respectively). The incidence of OG greater than 10 mOsm/kg was also higher in Groups C and D than in Group A (100.0% in both groups vs 77.4%, p = 0.011 for both). The incidence of moderate hyponatremia (125 mmol/L ≤ Na+ < 130 mmol/L) was significantly higher in Group D than in other groups (38.7% vs 0.0%, 9.7%, and 12.9% in Groups A, B, and C; p < 0.001, p = 0.008, and p = 0.020, respectively). Hyperkalemia (K+ > 5.0 mmol/L) was observed in 12.9% of patients in Group D only.

CONCLUSIONS

The higher doses of mannitol provided better brain relaxation but were associated with more adverse effects. Considering the balance between the benefits and risks of mannitol, the authors suggest the use of 1.0 g/kg of intraoperative mannitol for satisfactory brain relaxation with the fewest adverse effects.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT02168075 (clinicaltrials.gov)