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Ji Yeoun Lee, Young Ah Lee, Hae Woon Jung, Sangjoon Chong, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Choong-Ho Shin and Kyu-Chang Wang

OBJECTIVE

Due to their distinct location, suprasellar arachnoid cysts are known to cause a wide variety of problems, such as hydrocephalus, endocrine symptoms, and visual abnormalities. The long-term outcome of these cysts has not been elucidated. To find out the long-term outcome of suprasellar arachnoid cysts, a retrospective review of the patients was performed. The neurological and endocrine symptoms were thoroughly reviewed.

METHODS

Forty-five patients with suprasellar arachnoid cysts, with an average follow-up duration of 9.7 years, were enrolled in the study. A comprehensive review was performed of the results of follow-up regarding not only neurological symptoms but also endocrine status. The outcomes of 8 patients who did not undergo operations and were asymptomatic or had symptoms unrelated to the cyst were included in the series.

RESULTS

Surgery was most effective for the symptoms related to hydrocephalus (improvement in 32 of 32), but endocrine symptoms persisted after surgery (4 of 4) and required further medical management. More surprisingly, a fairly large number of patients (14 of 40; 1 was excluded because no pre- or postoperative endocrine evaluation was available) who had not shown endocrine symptoms at the time of the initial diagnosis and treatment later developed endocrine abnormalities such as precocious puberty and growth hormone deficiency. The patients with endocrine symptoms detected during the follow-up included those in both the operated (n = 12 of 32) and nonoperated (n = 2 of 8) groups who had been stable during follow-up since the initial diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS

This study implies that patients with suprasellar arachnoid cysts can develop late endocrine problems during follow-up, even if other symptoms related to the cyst have been successfully treated. Hence, patients with these cysts need long-term follow-up for not only neurological symptoms but also endocrine abnormalities.

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Ji Yeoun Lee, Sangjoon Chong, Young Hun Choi, Ji Hoon Phi, Jung-Eun Cheon, Seung-Ki Kim, Sung Hye Park, In-One Kim and Kyu-Chang Wang

OBJECTIVE

Since the entity limited dorsal myeloschisis (LDM) was proposed, numerous confusing clinical cases have been renamed according to the embryopathogenesis. However, clinical application of this label appears to require some clarification with regard to pathology. There have been cases in which all criteria for the diagnosis of LDM were met except for the presence of a neural component in the stalk, an entity the authors call “probable” LDM. The present study was performed to meticulously review these cases and suggest that a modified surgical strategy using limited laminectomy is sufficient to achieve the surgical goal of untethering.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings, operative notes, and pathology reports of spinal dysraphism patients with subcutaneous stalk lesions who had presented to their institution between 2010 and 2014.

RESULTS

Among 33 patients with LDM, 13 had the typical nonsaccular lesions with simple subcutaneous stalks connecting the skin opening to the spinal cord. Four cases had “true” LDM meeting all criteria for diagnosis, including pathological confirmation of CNS tissue by immunohistochemical staining with glial fibrillary acidic protein. There were also 9 cases in which all clinical, imaging, and surgical findings were compatible with LDM, but the “neural” component in the resected stalk was not confirmed. For all the cases, limited exposure of the stalk was done and satisfactory untethering was achieved.

CONCLUSIONS

One can speculate based on the initial error of embryogenesis that if the entire stalk were traced to the point of insertion on the cord, the neural component would be proven. However, this would require an extended level of laminectomy/laminotomy, which may be unnecessary, at least with regard to the completeness of untethering. Therefore, the authors propose that for some selected cases of LDM, a minimal extent of laminectomy may suffice for untethering, although it may be insufficient for diagnosing a true LDM.

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Seung Ah Choi, Sangjoon Chong, Pil Ae Kwak, Youn Joo Moon, Anshika Jangra, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Sung-Hye Park and Seung-Ki Kim

OBJECTIVE

Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) isolated from pediatric patients with moyamoya disease (MMD) have demonstrated decreased numbers and defective functioning in in vitro experiments. However, the function of ECFCs has not been evaluated using in vivo animal models. In this study, the authors compared normal and MMD ECFCs using a chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) rat model.

METHODS

A CCH rat model was made via ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion [2-VO]). The rats were divided into three experimental groups: vehicle-treated (n = 8), normal ECFC-treated (n = 8), and MMD ECFC-treated (n = 8). ECFCs were injected into the cisterna magna. A laser Doppler flowmeter was used to evaluate cerebral blood flow, and a radial arm maze test was used to examine cognitive function. Neuropathological examinations of the hippocampus and agranular cortex were performed using hematoxylin and eosin and Luxol fast blue staining in addition to immunofluorescence with CD31, von Willebrand factor, NeuN, myelin basic protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and cleaved caspase-3 antibodies.

RESULTS

The normal ECFC-treated group exhibited improvement in the restoration of cerebral perfusion and in behavior compared with the vehicle-treated and MMD ECFC-treated groups at the 12-week follow-up after the 2-VO surgery. The normal ECFC-treated group showed a greater amount of neovasculogenesis and neurogenesis, with less apoptosis, than the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS

These results support the impaired functional recovery of MMD ECFCs compared with normal ECFCs in a CCH rat model. This in vivo study suggests the functional role of ECFCs in the pathogenesis of MMD.

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Seung Ah Choi, Sangjoon Chong, Pil Ae Kwak, Youn Joo Moon, Anshika Jangra, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Sung-Hye Park and Seung-Ki Kim

OBJECTIVE

Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) isolated from pediatric patients with moyamoya disease (MMD) have demonstrated decreased numbers and defective functioning in in vitro experiments. However, the function of ECFCs has not been evaluated using in vivo animal models. In this study, the authors compared normal and MMD ECFCs using a chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) rat model.

METHODS

A CCH rat model was made via ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion [2-VO]). The rats were divided into three experimental groups: vehicle-treated (n = 8), normal ECFC-treated (n = 8), and MMD ECFC-treated (n = 8). ECFCs were injected into the cisterna magna. A laser Doppler flowmeter was used to evaluate cerebral blood flow, and a radial arm maze test was used to examine cognitive function. Neuropathological examinations of the hippocampus and agranular cortex were performed using hematoxylin and eosin and Luxol fast blue staining in addition to immunofluorescence with CD31, von Willebrand factor, NeuN, myelin basic protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and cleaved caspase-3 antibodies.

RESULTS

The normal ECFC-treated group exhibited improvement in the restoration of cerebral perfusion and in behavior compared with the vehicle-treated and MMD ECFC-treated groups at the 12-week follow-up after the 2-VO surgery. The normal ECFC-treated group showed a greater amount of neovasculogenesis and neurogenesis, with less apoptosis, than the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS

These results support the impaired functional recovery of MMD ECFCs compared with normal ECFCs in a CCH rat model. This in vivo study suggests the functional role of ECFCs in the pathogenesis of MMD.

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Jung Won Choi, Sung Min Son, Inhee Mook-Jung, Youn Joo Moon, Ji Yeoun Lee, Kyu-Chang Wang, Hyun-Seung Kang, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung Ah Choi, Sangjoon Chong, Jayoung Byun and Seung-Ki Kim

The authors performed morphological and functional studies of the mitochondria in particular blood cells, i.e., endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), from patients with moyamoya disease. The results indicated that the mitochondria of these ECFCs exhibit morphological and functional abnormalities, which may present new insights into the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease.