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Doo-Sik Kong, Stephanie Ming Young, Chang-Ki Hong, Yoon-Duck Kim, Sang Duk Hong, Jung Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol, Jung-Il Lee, Hyung Jin Shin, Do-Hyun Nam and Kyung In Woo

OBJECTIVE

Cranioorbital tumors are complex lesions that involve the deep orbit, floor of the frontal bone, and lesser and greater wing of the sphenoid bone. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and ophthalmological outcomes with an endoscopic transorbital approach (TOA) in the management of cranioorbital tumors involving the deep orbit and intracranial compartment.

METHODS

The authors performed endoscopic TOAs via the superior eyelid crease incision in 18 patients (16 TOA alone and 2 TOA combined with a simultaneous endonasal endoscopic resection) with cranioorbital tumors from September 2016 to November 2017. There were 12 patients with sphenoorbital meningiomas. Other lesions included osteosarcoma, plasmacytoma, sebaceous gland carcinoma, intraconal schwannoma, cystic teratoma, and fibrous dysplasia. Ten patients had primary lesions and 8 patients had recurrent tumors. Thirteen patients had intradural lesions, while 5 had only extradural lesions.

RESULTS

Of 18 patients, 7 patients underwent gross-total resection of the tumor and 7 patients underwent planned near-total resection of the tumor, leaving the cavernous sinus lesion. Subtotal resection was performed in 4 patients with recurrent tumors. There was no postoperative CSF leak requiring reconstruction surgery. Fourteen of 18 patients (77.8%) had preoperative proptosis on the ipsilateral side, and all 14 patients had improvement in exophthalmos; the mean proptosis reduced from 5.7 ± 2.7 mm to 1.5 ± 1.4 mm. However, some residual proptosis was evident in 9 of the 14 (64%). Ten of 18 patients (55.6%) had preoperative optic neuropathy, and 6 of them (60.0%) had improvement; the median best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/100 to 20/40. Thirteen of 18 patients showed mild ptosis at an immediate postoperative examination, all of whom had a spontaneous and complete recovery of their ptosis during the follow-up period. Three of 7 patients showed improvement in extraocular motility after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Endoscopic TOA can be considered as an option in the management of cranioorbital tumors involving complex anatomical areas, with acceptable sequelae and morbidity.

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Yong Hwy Kim, Chiman Jeon, Young-Bem Se, Sang Duk Hong, Ho Jun Seol, Jung-II Lee, Chul-Kee Park, Dong Gyu Kim, Hee-Won Jung, Doo Hee Han, Do-Hyun Nam and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach for treating primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus is a formidable task. The authors hypothesized that tumor involvement of nearby critical anatomical structures creates hurdles to endoscopic gross-total resection (GTR). The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach to treat primary malignancies involving the clivus and to analyze prognostic factors for GTR.

METHODS

Between January 2009 and November 2015, 42 patients underwent the endoscopic endonasal approach for resection of primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus at 2 independent institutions. Clinical data; tumor locations within the clivus; and anatomical involvement of the cavernous or paraclival internal carotid artery, cisternal trigeminal nerve, hypoglossal canal, and dura mater were investigated to assess the extent of resection. Possible prognostic factors affecting GTR were also analyzed.

RESULTS

Of the 42 patients, 37 were diagnosed with chordomas and 5 were diagnosed with chondrosarcomas. The mean (± SD) preoperative tumor volume was 25.2 ± 30.5 cm3 (range 0.8–166.7 cm3). GTR was achieved in 28 patients (66.7%) and subtotal resection in 14 patients (33.3%). All tumors were classified as upper (n = 17), middle (n = 17), or lower (n = 8) clival tumors based on clival involvement, and as central (24 [57.1%]) or paramedian (18 [42.9%]) based on laterality of the tumor. Univariate analysis identified the tumor laterality (OR 6.25, 95% CI 1.51–25.86; p = 0.011) as significantly predictive of GTR. In addition, the laterality of the tumor was found to be a statistically significant predictor in multivariate analysis (OR 41.16, 95% CI 1.12–1512.65; p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS

An endoscopic endonasal approach can provide favorable clinical and surgical outcomes. However, the tumor laterality should be considered as a potential obstacle to total removal.

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Jaewoo Chung, Wonhyoung Park, Seok Ho Hong, Jung Cheol Park, Jae Sung Ahn, Byung Duk Kwun, Sang-Ahm Lee, Sung-Hoon Kim and Ji-Ye Jeon

OBJECTIVE

Somatosensory and motor evoked potentials (SEPs and MEPs) are often used to prevent ischemic complications during aneurysm surgeries. However, surgeons often encounter cases with suspicious false-positive and false-negative results from intraoperative evoked potential (EP) monitoring, but the incidence and possible causes for these results are not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and reliability of EP monitoring in the microsurgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms by evaluating false-positive and false-negative cases.

METHODS

From January 2012 to April 2016, 1514 patients underwent surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) with EP monitoring at the authors’ institution. An EP amplitude decrease of 50% or greater compared with the baseline amplitude was defined as a significant EP change. Correlations between immediate postoperative motor weakness and EP monitoring results were retrospectively reviewed. The authors calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of intraoperative MEP monitoring, as well as the incidence of false-positive and false-negative results.

RESULTS

Eighteen (1.19%) of the 1514 patients had a symptomatic infarction, and 4 (0.26%) had a symptomatic hemorrhage. A total of 15 patients showed motor weakness, with the weakness detected on the immediate postoperative motor function test in 10 of these cases. Fifteen false-positive cases (0.99%) and 8 false-negative cases (0.53%) were reported. Therefore, MEP during UIA surgery resulted in a sensitivity of 0.10, specificity of 0.94, positive predictive value of 0.01, and negative predictive value of 0.99.

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative EP monitoring has high specificity and negative predictive value. Both false-positive and false-negative findings were present. However, it is likely that a more meticulously designed protocol will make EP monitoring a better surrogate indicator of possible ischemic neurological deficits.

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Chiman Jeon, Chang-Ki Hong, Kyung In Woo, Sang Duk Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Jung Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Tumors involving Meckel’s cave remain extremely challenging because of the surrounding complex neurovascular structures and deep-seated location. The authors investigated a new minimal-access technique using the endoscopic transorbital approach (eTOA) through the superior eyelid crease to Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions and reviewed the most useful surgical procedures and pitfalls of this approach.

METHODS

Between September 2016 and January 2018, the authors performed eTOA in 9 patients with tumors involving Meckel’s cave and the middle cranial fossa. The lesions included trigeminal schwannoma in 4 patients, meningioma in 2 patients, metastatic brain tumor in 1 patient, chondrosarcoma in 1 patient, and dermoid cyst in 1 patient. In 7 of the 9 patients, eTOA alone was performed, while the other 2 patients underwent a combined eTOA and endoscopic endonasal approach or retrosigmoid craniotomy. Data including details of surgical techniques and clinical outcomes were recorded.

RESULTS

Gross-total resection was performed in 7 of the 9 patients (77.8%). Four patients underwent extended eTOA (with lateral orbital rim osteotomy). Drilling of the trapezoid sphenoid floor, a middle fossa “peeling” technique, and full visualization of Meckel’s cave were applied to approach the lesions. Tumors were exposed and removed extradurally in 3 patients and intradurally in 6 patients. There was no postoperative CSF leak.

CONCLUSIONS

The eTOA affords a direct route to access Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions. With experience, this novel approach can be successfully applied to selected skull base lesions. To achieve successful removal of the tumor, emphasis should be placed on the importance of adequately removing the greater sphenoid wing and vertical crest. However, because of limited working space eTOA may not be an ideal approach for posterior fossa lesions.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Chang-Ki Hong, Sang Duk Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Ho Jun Seol, Jiwoong Oh, Dong Gyu Kim and Yong Hwy Kim

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) and the transcranial approach (TCA) are good options for the treatment of tuberculum sellae (TS) meningiomas. The objective of this study was to identify the key anatomical features in TS meningiomas and compare the two surgical approaches.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed clinical data in 178 patients with TS meningiomas treated at 3 institutions between January 2010 and July 2016. Patients with tumors encasing the internal carotid artery or anterior cerebral artery or involving the anterior clinoid process or cavernous sinus were excluded. Tumors were classified as high-lying or low-lying based on their location, and involvement of the optic canal was evaluated. The surgical outcomes of EEA and TCA were analyzed according to the relevant anatomical features.

RESULTS

During the study period, 84 patients underwent EEA and 94 patients underwent TCA. Based on preoperative MR images, 43 (24.2%) meningiomas were classified as high-lying tumors, 126 (70.8%) as low-lying, and 9 (5.0%) as nonspecific. Gross-total resection (GTR) was performed in 145 patients (81.5%); the GTR rate did not differ significantly between the EEA and TCA groups. Of 157 patients with preoperative visual disturbance, 140 had improved or stable vision postoperatively. However, 17 patients (9.6%) experienced some visual deterioration after surgery. The TCA group had a worse visual outcome than the EEA group in patients with preoperative optic canal involvement (77.6% vs 93.2%, p = 0.019), whereas there was no significant difference in visual outcome based on whether tumors were high-lying or low-lying.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study support EEA over TCA, at least with respect to visual improvement with acceptable complications, although TCA is still an effective approach for TS meningioma.