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Hemispherotomy and other disconnective techniques

Sandrine De Ribaupierre and Olivier Delalande

The surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy has evolved as new technical innovations have been made. Hemispherotomy techniques have been developed to replace hemispherectomy in order to reduce the complication rates while maintaining good seizure control.

Disconnective procedures are based on the interruption of the epileptic network rather than the removal of the epileptogenic zone. They can be applied to hemispheric pathologies, leading to hemispherotomy, but they can also be applied to posterior quadrant epilepsies, or hypothalamic hamartomas.

In this paper, the authors review the literature, present an overview of the historical background, and discuss the different techniques along with their outcomes and complications.

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Needs assessment for simulation training in neuroendoscopy: a Canadian national survey

Clinical article

Faizal A. Haji, Adam Dubrowski, James Drake, and Sandrine de Ribaupierre

Object

In recent years, dramatic changes in surgical education have increased interest in simulation-based training for complex surgical skills. This is particularly true for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), given the potential for serious intraoperative errors arising from surgical inexperience. However, prior to simulator development, a thorough assessment of training needs is essential to ensure development of educationally relevant platforms. The purpose of this study was to conduct a national needs assessment addressing specific goals of instruction, to guide development of simulation platforms, training curricula, and assessment metrics for ETV.

Methods

Canadian neurosurgeons performing ETV were invited to participate in a structured online questionnaire regarding the procedural steps for ETV, the frequency and significance of intraoperative errors committed while learning the technique, and simulation training modules of greatest potential educational benefit. Descriptive data analysis was completed for both quantitative and qualitative responses.

Results

Thirty-two (55.2%) of 58 surgeons completed the survey. All believed that virtual reality simulation training for ETV would be a valuable addition to clinical training. Selection of ventriculostomy site, navigation within the ventricles, and performance of the ventriculostomy ranked as the most important steps to simulate. Technically inadequate ventriculostomy and inappropriate fenestration site selection were ranked as the most frequent/significant errors. A standard ETV module was thought to be most beneficial for resident training.

Conclusions

To inform the development of a simulation-based training program for ETV, the authors have conducted a national needs assessment. The results provide valuable insight to inform key design elements necessary to construct an educationally relevant device and educational program.

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Presurgical brain mapping of the language network in pediatric patients with epilepsy using resting-state fMRI

Daiana R. Pur, Roy Eagleson, Marcus Lo, Michael T. Jurkiewicz, Andrea Andrade, and Sandrine de Ribaupierre

OBJECTIVE

Epilepsy affects neural processing and often causes intra- or interhemispheric language reorganization, rendering localization solely based on anatomical landmarks (e.g., Broca’s area) unreliable. Preoperative brain mapping is necessary to weigh the risk of resection with the risk of postoperative deficit. However, the use of conventional mapping methods (e.g., somatosensory stimulation, task-based functional MRI [fMRI]) in pediatric patients is technically difficult due to low compliance and their unique neurophysiology. Resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), a “task-free” technique based on the neural activity of the brain at rest, has the potential to overcome these limitations. The authors hypothesized that language networks can be identified from rs-fMRI by applying functional connectivity analyses.

METHODS

Cases in which both task-based fMRI and rs-fMRI were acquired as part of the preoperative clinical protocol for epilepsy surgery were reviewed. Task-based fMRI consisted of 2 language tasks and 1 motor task. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired while the patients watched an animated movie and were analyzed using independent component analysis (i.e., data-driven method). The authors extracted language networks from rs-fMRI data by performing a similarity analysis with functionally defined language network templates via a template-matching procedure. The Dice coefficient was used to quantify the overlap.

RESULTS

Thirteen children underwent conventional task-based fMRI (e.g., verb generation, object naming), rs-fMRI, and structural imaging at 1.5T. The language components with the highest overlap with the language templates were identified for each patient. Language lateralization results from task-based fMRI and rs-fMRI mapping were comparable, with good concordance in most cases. Resting-state fMRI–derived language maps indicated that language was on the left in 4 patients (31%), on the right in 5 patients (38%), and bilateral in 4 patients (31%). In some cases, rs-fMRI indicated a more extensive language representation.

CONCLUSIONS

Resting-state fMRI–derived language network data were identified at the patient level using a template-matching method. More than half of the patients in this study presented with atypical language lateralization, emphasizing the need for mapping. Overall, these data suggest that this technique may be used to preoperatively identify language networks in pediatric patients. It may also optimize presurgical planning of electrode placement and thereby guide the surgeon’s approach to the epileptogenic zone.

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Can ventricular 3D ultrasound of neonates with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus inform on the need for a ventriculoperitoneal shunt?

Priyanka Roy, Marcus Lo, David Tessier, Jessica Kishimoto, Soume Bhattacharya, Roy Eagleson, Aaron Fenster, and Sandrine de Ribaupierre

OBJECTIVE

Some neonates born prematurely with intraventricular hemorrhage develop posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and require lifelong treatment to divert the flow of CSF. Early prediction of the eventual need for a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is difficult, and early discussions with families are based on statistics and the grade of hemorrhage. The authors hypothesize that change in ventricular volume during ventricular taps that is measured with repeated 3D ultrasound (3D US) imaging of the lateral ventricles could be used to assess the risk of the future requirement of a VPS.

METHODS

A total of 92 neonates with intraventricular hemorrhage who were treated in the NICU were recruited between April 2012 and November 2019. Only patients who required ventricular taps (VTs) were included in this study, resulting in the analysis of 19 patients with a total of 61 VTs. Among them, 14 patients were treated with a VPS, and in 5 patients the hydrocephalus resolved spontaneously. Parameters studied were total ventricular volume measured with 3D US, ventricular volume change after VT, the ratio between volume reduction and tap amount, the difference between tap amount and volume reduction after tap, the average tap amount, the average number of days between taps, pre-tap head circumference, and reduction in head circumference after tap.

RESULTS

Statistically significant differences were found in ventricular volume reduction after tap (p = 0.007), the ratio between volume reduction and tap amount (p = 0.03), the difference between tap amount and volume reduction after tap (p = 0.05), and the interval of days between taps (p = 0.0115).

CONCLUSIONS

Measuring with 3D US before and after VT can be a useful tool for quantifying ventricular volume. The findings in this study showed that neonates who experience a large reduction of ventricular volume after VT are more likely to be treated with a shunt than are neonates who experience a small reduction.

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Neurosurgical management of frontal lobe epilepsy in children

Clinical article

Shobhan Vachhrajani, Sandrine de Ribaupierre, Hiroshi Otsubo, Ayako Ochi, Shelly K. Weiss, Elizabeth J. Donner, Elysa Widjaja, Elizabeth Kerr, Mary Lou Smith, James Drake, O. Carter Snead III, and James T. Rutka

Object

Pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) remains a challenging condition for neurosurgeons and epileptologists to manage. Postoperative seizure outcomes remain far inferior to those observed in temporal lobe epilepsies, possibly due to inherent difficulties in delineating and subsequently completely resecting responsible epileptogenic regions. In this study, the authors review their institutional experience with the surgical management of FLE and attempt to find predictors that may help to improve seizure outcome in this population.

Methods

All surgically treated cases of intractable FLE from 1990 to 2008 were reviewed. Demographic information, preoperative and intraoperative imaging and electrophysiological investigations, and follow-up seizure outcome were assessed. Inferential statistics were performed to look for potential predictors of seizure outcome.

Results

Forty patients (20 male, 20 female) underwent surgical management of FLE during the study period. Patients were an average of 5.6 years old at the time of FLE onset and 11.7 years at the time of surgery; patients were followed for a mean of 40.25 months. Most patients displayed typical FLE semiology. Twenty-eight patients had discrete lesions identified on MRI. Eight patients underwent 2 operations. Cortical dysplasia was the most common pathological diagnosis. Engel Class I outcome was obtained in 25 patients (62.5%), while Engel Class II outcome was observed in 5 patients (12.5%). No statistically significant predictors of outcome were found.

Conclusions

Control of FLE remains a challenging problem. Favorable seizure outcome, obtained in 62% of patients in this series, is still not as easily obtained in FLE as it is in temporal lobe epilepsy. While no statistically significant predictors of seizure outcome were revealed in this study, patients with FLE continue to require extensive workup and investigation to arrive at a logical and comprehensive neurosurgical treatment plan. Future studies with improved neuroimaging and advanced invasive monitoring strategies may well help define factors for success in this form of epilepsy that is difficult to control.

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Pediatric colloid cysts: a multinational, multicenter study. An IFNE-ISPN-ESPN collaboration

Jonathan Roth, Yurii Perekopaiko, Danil A. Kozyrev, Shlomi Constantini, and on behalf of the Pediatric Colloid Cyst Study Group (PCCSG)

OBJECTIVE

Colloid cysts (CCs) are rare at all ages, and particularly among children. The current literature on pediatric CC is limited, and often included in mixed adult/pediatric series. The goal of this multinational, multicenter study was to combine forces among centers and investigate the clinical course of pediatric CCs.

METHODS

A multinational, multicenter retrospective study was performed to attain a large sample size, focusing on CC diagnosis in patients younger than 18 years of age. Collected data included clinical presentation, radiological characteristics, treatment, and outcome.

RESULTS

One hundred thirty-four children with CCs were included. Patient age at diagnosis ranged from 2.4 to 18 years (mean 12.8 ± 3.4 years, median 13.2 years, interquartile range 10.3–15.4 years; 22% were < 10 years of age). Twenty-two cases (16%) were diagnosed incidentally, including 48% of those younger than 10 years of age. Most of the other patients had symptoms related to increased intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. The average follow-up duration for the entire group was 49.5 ± 45.8 months. Fifty-nine patients were initially followed, of whom 28 were eventually operated on at a mean of 19 ± 32 months later due to cyst growth, increasing hydrocephalus, and/or new symptoms. There was a clear correlation between larger cysts and symptomatology, acuteness of symptoms, hydrocephalus, and need for surgery. Older age was also associated with the need for surgery. One hundred three children (77%) underwent cyst resection, 60% using a purely endoscopic approach. There was 1 death related to acute hydrocephalus at presentation. Ten percent of operated patients had some form of complication, and 7.7% of operated cases required a shunt at some point during follow-up. Functional outcome was good; however, the need for immediate surgery was associated with educational limitations. Twenty operated cases (20%) experienced a recurrence of their CC at a mean of 38 ± 46 months after the primary surgery. The CC recurrence rate was 24% following endoscopic resection and 15% following open resections (p = 0.28).

CONCLUSIONS

CCs may present in all pediatric age groups, although most that are symptomatic present after the age of 10 years. Incidentally discovered cysts should be closely followed, as many may grow, leading to hydrocephalus and other new symptoms. Presentation of CC may be acute and may cause life-threatening conditions related to hydrocephalus, necessitating urgent treatment. The outcome of treated children with CCs is favorable.

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Abstracts for the 2013 Annual Meeting of The American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgeons

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Oral Presentations 2015 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting Washington, DC • May 2–6, 2015

Published online August 1, 2015; DOI: 10.3171/2015.8.JNS.AANS2015abstracts