Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ryota Suzuki x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Ryota Kurogi, Akira Nakamizo, Satoshi O. Suzuki, Masahiro Mizoguchi, Koji Yoshimoto, Toshiyuki Amano, Takeo Amemiya, So Takagishi, and Koji Iihara

OBJECTIVE

Human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) show tropism for brain tumors and may be a useful vehicle for drug or gene delivery to malignant gliomas. Recently, some microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to suppress the invasiveness of malignant gliomas.

METHODS

To test their potential to become vehicles for the delivery of miRNA to malignant gliomas, hMSCs were engineered so that hMSC secretion of miRNAs that inhibit glioma cell invasion was enabled without altering the hMSC tropism for glioma cells.

RESULTS

In coculture, hMSCs cotransfected with hsa-miR-145-5p and -31-5p miRNAs showed markedly reduced invasion by U87 glioma cells in a contact-dependent manner both in vitro and ex vivo, with invasion of hMSCs cotransfected with these 2 miRNAs by the U87 cells reduced to 60.7% compared with control cells. According to a Matrigel invasion assay, the tropism of the hMSCs for U87 cells was not affected. In glioma cell lines U251 and LN229, hMSCs exhibited tropism in vivo, and invasion of hMSCs cotransfected with hsa-miR-145-5p and -31-5p was also significantly less than that of control cells. When U87 cells were coimplanted into the striatum of organotypic rat brain slices with hMSCs cotransfected with hsa-miR-145 and -31-5p, the relative invasive area decreased by 37.1%; interestingly, these U87 cells showed a change to a rounded morphology that was apparent at the invasion front. Whole-genome microarray analysis of the expression levels of 58,341 genes revealed that the co-overexpression of hsa-miR-145-5p and -31-5p downregulated FSCN1 expression in U87 cells.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that miRNA overexpression in hMSCs can alter the function of glioma cells via contact-dependent transfer. Co-overexpression of multiple miRNAs may be a useful and novel therapeutic strategy. The study results suggest that hMSCs can be applied as a delivery vehicle for miRNAs.

Restricted access

Yuichiro Hisada, Tsutomu Endo, Yoshinao Koike, Masahiro Kanayama, Ryota Suzuki, Ryo Fujita, Katsuhisa Yamada, Akira Iwata, Hiroyuki Hasebe, Hideki Sudo, Norimasa Iwasaki, and Masahiko Takahata

OBJECTIVE

Data regarding risk factors for the progression of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the thoracic spine are scarce. Therefore, in this study, the authors aimed to elucidate the difference in the radiographic progression pattern of OPLL and its risk factors between cervical and thoracic OPLL using longitudinally acquired whole-spine CT scans.

METHODS

Overall, 123 patients with symptomatic OPLL who underwent repeated whole-spine CT examinations, with an average interval of 49 months (at least 3 years) between scans, were retrospectively reviewed. Progression of OPLL was assessed to compare the distribution of OPLL over the entire spine on the initial and final CT scans. Patients were divided into a cervical OPLL (C-OPLL) group and a thoracic OPLL (T-OPLL) group according to the location of the main lesion. The progression pattern of OPLL and its risk factors were compared between the two groups using the Student t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test.

RESULTS

In the C-OPLL group, 15 (22.1%) of 68 patients had OPLL progression, of whom 12 patients (80.0%) had progression only in the cervical spine and 3 patients (20.0%) had progression in multiple regions (cervical and thoracic/lumbar). In the T-OPLL group, 16 (29.1%) of 55 patients had OPLL progression, of which 3 patients (18.8%) had progression only in the thoracic spine and 8 patients (50.0%) had progression in multiple regions. Young age was a common risk factor for OPLL progression regardless of the location of OPLL, and this trend was more pronounced in the T-OPLL group than in the C-OPLL group. High BMI, male sex, and multilevel, severe T-OPLL were identified as independent risk factors for progression of T-OPLL (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03–1.37; OR 10.5, 95% CI 1.39–81.94; and OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.16–1.45, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with T-OPLL are predisposed to diffuse progression of OPLL over the entire spine, whereas patients with C-OPLL are likely to have progression in only the cervical spine. Young age and high BMI are significant risk factors for OPLL progression, especially in patients with T-OPLL. Our study highlights the need for continued follow-up in patients with T-OPLL, especially in young patients and those with obesity, for early detection of spinal cord and cauda equina symptoms due to the progression of OPLL throughout the spine.

Open access

Masafumi Hiramatsu, Ryota Ishibashi, Etsuji Suzuki, Yuko Miyazaki, Satoshi Murai, Hiroki Takai, Yuji Takasugi, Yoko Yamaoka, Kazuhiko Nishi, Yu Takahashi, Jun Haruma, Tomohito Hishikawa, Takao Yasuhara, Masaki Chin, Shunji Matsubara, Masaaki Uno, Koji Tokunaga, Kenji Sugiu, and Isao Date

OBJECTIVE

There have been no accurate surveillance data regarding the incidence rate of spinal arteriovenous shunts (SAVSs). Here, the authors investigate the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of SAVSs.

METHODS

The authors conducted multicenter hospital-based surveillance as an inventory survey at 8 core hospitals in Okayama Prefecture between April 1, 2009, and March 31, 2019. Consecutive patients who lived in Okayama and were diagnosed with SAVSs on angiographic studies were enrolled. The clinical characteristics and the incidence rates of each form of SAVS and the differences between SAVSs at different spinal levels were analyzed.

RESULTS

The authors identified a total of 45 patients with SAVSs, including 2 cases of spinal arteriovenous malformation, 5 cases of perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF), 31 cases of spinal dural AVF (SDAVF), and 7 cases of spinal epidural AVF (SEAVF). The crude incidence rate was 0.234 per 100,000 person-years for all SAVSs including those at the craniocervical junction (CCJ) level. The incidence rate of SDAVF and SEAVF combined increased with advancing age in men only. In a comparative analysis between upper and lower spinal SDAVF/SEAVF, hemorrhage occurred in 7/14 cases (50%) at the CCJ/cervical level and in 0/24 cases (0%) at the thoracolumbar level (p = 0.0003). Venous congestion appeared in 1/14 cases (7%) at the CCJ/cervical level and in 23/24 cases (96%) at the thoracolumbar level (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

The authors reported detailed incidence rates of SAVSs in Japan. There were some differences in clinical characteristics of SAVSs in the upper spinal levels and those in the lower spinal levels.

Restricted access

Yawara Eguchi, Masaki Norimoto, Munetaka Suzuki, Ryota Haga, Hajime Yamanaka, Hiroshi Tamai, Tatsuya Kobayashi, Sumihisa Orita, Miyako Suzuki, Kazuhide Inage, Hirohito Kanamoto, Koki Abe, Tomotaka Umimura, Takashi Sato, Yasuchika Aoki, Atsuya Watanabe, Masao Koda, Takeo Furuya, Junichi Nakamura, Tsutomu Akazawa, Kazuhisa Takahashi, and Seiji Ohtori

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between vertebral bodies, psoas major morphology, and the course of lumbar nerve tracts using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) before lateral interbody fusion (LIF) to treat spinal deformities.

METHODS

DTI findings in a group of 12 patients (all women, mean age 74.3 years) with degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) were compared with those obtained in a matched control group of 10 patients (all women, mean age 69.8 years) with low-back pain but without scoliosis. A T2-weighted sagittal view was fused to tractography from L3 to L5 and separated into 6 zones (zone A, zones 1–4, and zone P) comprising equal quarters of the anteroposterior diameters, and anterior and posterior to the vertebral body, to determine the distribution of nerves at various intervertebral levels (L3–4, L4–5, and L5–S1). To determine psoas morphology, the authors examined images for a rising psoas sign at the level of L4–5, and the ratio of the anteroposterior diameter (AP) to the lateral diameter (lat), or AP/lat ratio, was calculated. They assessed the relationship between apical vertebrae, psoas major morphology, and the course of nerve tracts.

RESULTS

Although only 30% of patients in the control group showed a rising psoas sign, it was present in 100% of those in the DLS group. The psoas major was significantly extended on the concave side (AP/lat ratio: 2.1 concave side, 1.2 convex side). In 75% of patients in the DLS group, the apex of the curve was at L2 or higher (upper apex) and the psoas major was extended on the concave side. In the remaining 25%, the apex was at L3 or lower (lower apex) and the psoas major was extended on the convex side. Significant anterior shifts of lumbar nerves compared with controls were noted at each intervertebral level in patients with DLS. Nerves on the extended side of the psoas major were significantly shifted anteriorly. Nerve pathways on the convex side of the scoliotic curve were shifted posteriorly.

CONCLUSIONS

A significant anterior shift of lumbar nerves was noted at all intervertebral levels in patients with DLS in comparison with findings in controls. On the convex side, the nerves showed a posterior shift. In LIF, a convex approach is relatively safer than an approach from the concave side. Lumbar nerve course tracking with DTI is useful for assessing patients with DLS before LIF.

Free access

Ryota Kurogi, Akiko Kada, Kunihiro Nishimura, Satoru Kamitani, Ataru Nishimura, Tetsuro Sayama, Jyoji Nakagawara, Kazunori Toyoda, Kuniaki Ogasawara, Junichi Ono, Yoshiaki Shiokawa, Toru Aruga, Shigeru Miyachi, Izumi Nagata, Shinya Matsuda, Shinichi Yoshimura, Kazuo Okuchi, Akifumi Suzuki, Fumiaki Nakamura, Daisuke Onozuka, Akihito Hagihara, Koji Iihara, and the J-ASPECT Study Collaborators

OBJECTIVE

Although heterogeneity in patient outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been observed across different centers, the relative merits of clipping and coiling for SAH remain unknown. The authors sought to compare the patient outcomes between these therapeutic modalities using a large nationwide discharge database encompassing hospitals with different comprehensive stroke center (CSC) capabilities.

METHODS

They analyzed data from 5214 patients with SAH (clipping 3624, coiling 1590) who had been urgently hospitalized at 393 institutions in Japan in the period from April 2012 to March 2013. In-hospital mortality, modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score, cerebral infarction, complications, hospital length of stay, and medical costs were compared between the clipping and coiling groups after adjustment for patient-level and hospital-level characteristics by using mixed-model analysis.

RESULTS

Patients who had undergone coiling had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (12.4% vs 8.7%, OR 1.3) and a shorter median hospital stay (32.0 vs 37.0 days, p < 0.001) than those who had undergone clipping. The respective proportions of patients discharged with mRS scores of 3–6 (46.4% and 42.9%) and median medical costs (thousands US$, 35.7 and 36.7) were not significantly different between the groups. These results remained robust after further adjustment for CSC capabilities as a hospital-related covariate.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the increasing use of coiling, clipping remains the mainstay treatment for SAH. Regardless of CSC capabilities, clipping was associated with reduced in-hospital mortality, similar unfavorable functional outcomes and medical costs, and a longer hospital stay as compared with coiling in 2012 in Japan. Further study is required to determine the influence of unmeasured confounders.