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Hannah E. Gilder, Ross C. Puffer, Mohamad Bydon and Robert J. Spinner

OBJECTIVE

In this study, the authors sought to compare tumors with intradural extension to those remaining in the epidural or paraspinal space with the hypothesis that intradural extension may be a mechanism for seeding of the CSF with malignant cells, thereby resulting in higher rates of CNS metastases and shorter overall survival.

METHODS

The authors searched the medical record for cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) identified from 1994 to 2017. The charts of the identified patients were then reviewed for tumor location to identify patients with paraspinal malignancy. All patients included in the study had tumor specimens that were reviewed in the surgical pathology department. Paraspinal tumors with intradural extension were identified in the lumbar, sacral, and spinal accessory nerves, and attempts were made to match this cohort to another cohort of patients who had paraspinal tumors of the cranial nerves and lumbar and sacral spinal regions without intradural extension. Further information was collected on all patients with and without intradural extension, including date of diagnosis by pathology specimen review; nerve or nerves of tumor origin; presence, location, and diagnostic date of any CNS metastases; and either the date of death or date of last follow-up.

RESULTS

The authors identified 6 of 179 (3.4%) patients who had intradural tumor extension and compared these patients with 12 patients who harbored paraspinal tumors that did not have intradural extension. All tumors were diagnosed as high-grade MPNSTs according to the surgical pathology findings. Four of 6 (66.7%) patients with intradural extension had documented CNS metastases. The presence of CNS metastases was significantly higher in the intradural group than in the paraspinal group (intradural, 66.7% vs paraspinal, 0%; p < 0.01). Time from diagnosis until death was 11.2 months in the intradural group and approximately 72 months in the paraspinal, extradural cohort.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with intradural extension of paraspinal MPNSTs, significantly higher rates of CNS metastases are seen with a reduced interval of time from diagnosis to metastatic lesion detection. Intradural tumor extension is also a poor prognostic factor for survival, with these patients showing a reduced mean time from diagnosis to death.

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Ross C. Puffer, Ryan Planchard, Grant W. Mallory and Michelle J. Clarke

OBJECT

Health care-related costs after lumbar spine surgery vary depending on procedure type and patient characteristics. Age, body mass index (BMI), number of spinal levels, and presence of comorbidities probably have significant effects on overall costs. The present study assessed the impact of patient characteristics on hospital costs in patients undergoing elective lumbar decompressive spine surgery.

METHODS

This study was a retrospective review of elective lumbar decompression surgeries, with a focus on specific patient characteristics to determine which factors drive postoperative, hospital-related costs. Records between January 2010 and July 2012 were searched retrospectively. Only elective lumbar decompressions including discectomy or laminectomy were included. Cost data were obtained using a database that allows standardization of a list of hospital costs to the fiscal year 2013–2014. The relationship between cost and patient factors including age, BMI, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System grade were analyzed using Student t-tests, ANOVA, and multivariate regression analyses.

RESULTS

There were 1201 patients included in the analysis, with a mean age of 61.6 years. Sixty percent of patients in the study were male. Laminectomies were performed in 557 patients (46%) and discectomies in 644 (54%). Laminectomies led to an increased hospital stay of 1.4 days (p < 0.001) and increased hospital costs by $1523 (p < 0.001) when compared with discectomies. For laminectomies, age, BMI, ASA grade, number of levels, and durotomy all led to significantly increased hospital costs and length of stay on univariate analysis, but ASA grade and presence of a durotomy did not maintain significance on multivariate analysis for hospital costs. For a laminectomy, patient age ≥ 65 years was associated with a 0.6-day increased length of stay and a $945 increase in hospital costs when compared with patient age < 65 years (p < 0.001). A durotomy during a laminectomy increased length of stay by 1.0 day and increased hospital costs by $1382 (p < 0.03). For discectomies, age, ASA grade, and durotomy were significantly associated with increased hospital costs on univariate analysis, but BMI was not. Only age and presence of a durotomy maintained significance on multivariate analysis. There was a significant increase in hospital length of stay in patients undergoing discectomy with increasing age, BMI, ASA grade, and presence of a durotomy on univariate analysis. However, only age and presence of a durotomy maintained significance on multivariate analysis. For discectomies, age ≥ 65 years was associated with a 0.7-day increased length of stay (p < 0.001) and an increase of $931 in postoperative hospital costs (p < 0.01) when compared with age < 65 years.

CONCLUSIONS

Patient factors such as age, BMI, and comorbidities have significant and measurable effects on the postoperative hospital costs of elective lumbar decompression spinal surgeries. Knowledge of how these factors affect costs will become important as reimbursement models change.

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Ross C. Puffer, William E. Clifton, Grant W. Mallory and Michelle J. Clarke

OBJECT

Delayed cervical palsy (DCP) is a known complication following cervical spine surgery. While most DCPs eventually improve, they can result in significant temporary disability. Postoperative complications affect hospital length of stay (LOS) as well as overall hospital cost. The authors sought to determine the hospital cost of DCP after cervical spine fusion operations.

METHODS

A retrospective review of patients undergoing cervical fusion for degenerative disease at the Mayo Clinic from 2008 to 2012 was performed. Patients who developed DCPs not attributable to intraoperative trauma were included. All nonoperative-related costs were compared with similar costs in a control group matched according to age, sex, and surgical approach. All costs and services were reflective of the standard costs for the current year. Raw cost data were presented using ratios due to institutional policy against publishing cost data.

RESULTS

There were 27 patients (18 men, 9 women) who underwent fusion and developed a DCP over the study period. These patients were compared with 24 controls (15 men, 9 women) undergoing fusion in the same time period. There was no difference between patients and controls in mean age (62.4 ± 3.1 years vs 63.8 ± 2.5 years, respectively; p = 0.74), LOS (4.2 ± 3.3 days vs 3.8 ± 4.5 days, respectively; p = 0.43), or operating room–related costs (1.08 ± 0.09 vs 1.0 ± 0.07, respectively; p = 0.58). There was a significant difference in nonoperative hospital-related costs between patients and controls (1.67 ± 0.15 vs 1.0 ± 0.09, respectively; p = 0.04). There was a significantly higher utilization of postoperative imaging (CT or MRI) in the DCP group (14/27, 52%) when compared with the matched cohort (4/24, 17%; p = 0.018), and a significantly higher utilization of physiatry services (24/27 [89%] vs 15/24 [63%], respectively; p = 0.046).

CONCLUSIONS

While DCPs did not significantly prolong the length of hospitalization, they did increase hospital-related costs. This method could be further extrapolated to model costs of other complications as well.

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Ross C. Puffer, David J. Daniels, David F. Kallmes, Harry J. Cloft and Giuseppe Lanzino

Object

The authors conducted a study to review their experience with tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) treated with transarterial endovascular embolization in which Onyx was used.

Methods

The authors reviewed prospectively collected data in 9 patients with tentorial DAVFs treated with Onyx embolization between 2008 and 2011. Information reviewed included clinical presentation, angiographic features, treatment, and clinical and radiologically documented outcome. Clinical follow-up was available in every patient. Radiological follow-up studies were available in 8 of 9 patients (mean follow-up 4.6 months).

Results

Six of 9 patients had complete angiographic obliteration (in 5 this was confirmed by a follow-up angiogram obtained 3–6 months later), and 2 patients had near-complete obliteration (faint filling of the venous drainage in the late venous phase). One patient had partial obliteration and required surgical disconnection. In all patients with complete obliteration, transarterial embolization was performed through the posterior branch of the middle meningeal artery. There were no procedural complications, and no morbidity or mortality resulted from Onyx embolization.

Conclusions

Transarterial Onyx embolization is a valid, effective, and safe alternative to surgical disconnection in many patients with tentorial DAVFs. The presence of an adequate posterior branch of the middle meningeal artery is critical to achieve a microcatheter position distal enough to increase the likelihood of complete obliteration.

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Christopher S. Graffeo, Avital Perry, Ross C. Puffer, Lucas P. Carlstrom, Wendy Chang, Grant W. Mallory and Michelle J. Clarke

OBJECTIVE

Type II odontoid fracture is a common injury among elderly patients, particularly given their predisposition toward low-energy falls. Previous studies have demonstrated a survival advantage following early surgery among patients older than 65 years, yet octogenarians represent a medically distinct and rapidly growing population. The authors compared operative and nonoperative management in patients older than 79 years.

METHODS

A single-center prospectively maintained trauma database was reviewed using ICD-9 codes to identify octogenarians with C-2 cervical fractures between 1998 and 2014. Cervical CT images were independently reviewed by blinded neurosurgeons to confirm a Type II fracture pattern. Prospectively recorded outcomes included Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, Injury Severity Score (ISS), additional cervical fracture, and cord injury. Primary end points were mortality at 30 days and at 1 year. Statistical tests included the Student t-test, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Kaplan-Meier test, and Cox proportional hazard.

RESULTS

A total of 111 patients met inclusion criteria (94 nonoperative and 17 operative [15 posterior and 2 anterior]). Mortality data were available for 100% of patients. The mean age was 87 years (range 80–104 years). Additional cervical fracture, spinal cord injury, GCS score, AIS score, and ISS were not associated with either management strategy at the time of presentation. The mean time to death or last follow-up was 22 months (range 0–129 months) and was nonsignificant between operative and nonoperative groups (p = 0.3). Overall mortality was 13% in-hospital, 26% at 30 days, and 41% at 1 year. Nonoperative and operative mortality rates were not significant at any time point (12% vs 18%, p = 0.5 [in-hospital]; 27% vs 24%, p = 0.8 [30-day]; and 41% vs 41%, p = 1.0 [1-year]). Kaplan-Meier analysis did not demonstrate a survival advantage for either management strategy. Spinal cord injury, GCS score, AIS score, and ISS were significantly associated with 30-day and 1-year mortality; however, Cox modeling was not significant for any variable. Additional cervical fracture was not associated with increased mortality. The rate of nonhome disposition was not significant between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Type II odontoid fracture is associated with high morbidity among octogenarians, with 41% 1-year mortality independent of intervention—a dramatic decrease from actuarial survival rates for all 80-, 90-, and 100-year-old Americans. Poor outcome is associated with spinal cord injury, GCS score, AIS score, and ISS.

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Ross C. Puffer, David F. Kallmes, Harry J. Cloft and Giuseppe Lanzino

Object

In this study the authors determined the patency rate of the ophthalmic artery (OphA) after placement of 1 or more flow diversion devices across the arterial inlet for treatment of proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, and correlated possible risk factors for OphA occlusion.

Methods

Nineteen consecutive patients were identified (mean age 53.9 years, range 23–74 years, all female) who were treated for 20 ICA aneurysms. In all patients a Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) was placed across the ostium of the OphA while treating the target aneurysm. Flow through the OphA after PED placement was determined by immediate angiography as well as follow-up angiograms (mean 8.7 months), compared with the baseline study. Potential risk factors for OphA occlusion, including age, immediate angiographic flow through the ophthalmic branch, status of flow within the aneurysm after placement of PEDs, whether the ophthalmic branch originated from the aneurysm dome, and number of PEDs placed across the ophthalmic branch inlet were correlated with patency rate.

Results

Patients were treated with 1–3 PEDs (3 aneurysms treated with placement of 1 PED, 12 with 2 PEDs, and 5 with 3 PEDs). In 17 (85%) of 20 treated aneurysms, no changes in the OphA flow were noted immediately after placement of the device. Two (10%) of 20 patients had delayed antegrade filling immediately following PED placement and 1 patient (5%) had retrograde flow from collaterals to the OphA immediately after placement of the device. One patient (5%) experienced delayed asymptomatic ICA occlusion; this patient was excluded from analysis at follow-up. At follow-up the OphA remained patent with normal antegrade flow in 13 (68%) of 19 patients, patent but with slow antegrade flow in 2 patients (11%), and was occluded in 4 patients (21%). No visual changes or clinical symptoms developed in patients with OphA flow compromise. The mean number of PEDs in the patients with occluded OphAs or change in flow at angiographic follow-up was 2.4 (SEM 0.2) compared with 1.9 (SEM 0.18) in the patients with no change in OphA flow (p = 0.09). There was no significant difference between the patients with occluded OphAs compared with nonoccluded branches based on patient age, immediate angiographic flow through the ophthalmic branch, status of flow through the aneurysm after placement of PEDs, whether the ophthalmic branch originated from the aneurysm dome, or number of PEDs placed across the ophthalmic branch inlet.

Conclusions

Approximately one-quarter of OphAs will undergo proximal thrombosis when covered with flow diversion devices. Even though these events were well-tolerated clinically, our findings suggest that coverage of branch arteries that have adequate collateral circulation may lead to spontaneous occlusion of those branches.

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Ross C. Puffer, John K. Yue, Matthew Mesley, Julia B. Billigen, Jane Sharpless, Anita L. Fetzick, Ava Puccio, Ramon Diaz-Arrastia and David O. Okonkwo

OBJECTIVE

Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), midline shift of the brain at the level of the septum pellucidum is often caused by unilateral space-occupying lesions and is associated with increased intracranial pressure and worsened morbidity and mortality. While outcome has been studied in this population, the recovery trajectory has not been reported in a large cohort of patients with TBI. The authors sought to utilize the Citicoline Brain Injury Treatment (COBRIT) trial to analyze patient recovery over time depending on degree of midline shift at presentation.

METHODS

Patient data from the COBRIT trial were stratified into 4 groups of midline shift, and outcome measures were analyzed at 30, 90, and 180 days postinjury. A recovery trajectory analysis was performed identifying patients with outcome measures at all 3 time points to analyze the degree of recovery based on midline shift at presentation.

RESULTS

There were 892, 1169, and 895 patients with adequate outcome data at 30, 90, and 180 days, respectively. Rates of favorable outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended [GOS-E] scores 4–8) at 6 months postinjury were 87% for patients with no midline shift, 79% for patients with 1–5 mm of shift, 64% for patients with 6–10 mm of shift, and 47% for patients with > 10 mm of shift. The mean improvement from unfavorable outcome (GOS-E scores 2 and 3) to favorable outcome (GOS-E scores 4–8) from 1 month to 6 months in all groups was 20% (range 4%–29%). The mean GOS-E score for patients in the 6- to 10-mm group crossed from unfavorable outcome (GOS-E scores 2 and 3) into favorable outcome (GOS-E scores 4–8) at 90 days, and the mean GOS-E of patients in the > 10-mm group nearly reached the threshold of favorable outcome by 180 days postinjury.

CONCLUSIONS

In this secondary analysis of the Phase 3 COBRIT trial, TBI patients with less than 10 mm of midline shift on admission head CT had significantly improved functional outcomes through 180 days after injury compared with those with greater than 10 mm of midline shift. Of note, nearly 50% of patients with > 10 mm of midline shift achieved a favorable outcome (GOS-E score 4–8) by 6 months postinjury.