Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: Roham Moftakhar x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Brian P. Witwer, Roham Moftakhar, Khader M. Hasan, Praveen Deshmukh, Victor Haughton, Aaron Field, Konstantinos Arfanakis, Jane Noyes, Chad H. Moritz, M. Elizabeth Meyerand, Howard A. Rowley, Andrew L. Alexander and Behnam Badie

Object. Preserving vital cerebral function while maximizing tumor resection is a principal goal in surgical neurooncology. Although functional magnetic resonance imaging has been useful in the localization of eloquent cerebral cortex, this method does not provide information about the white matter tracts that may be involved in invasive, intrinsic brain tumors. Recently, diffusion-tensor (DT) imaging techniques have been used to map white matter tracts in the normal brain. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of DT imaging in preoperative mapping of white matter tracts in relation to cerebral neoplasms.

Methods. Nine patients with brain malignancies (one pilocytic astrocytoma, five oligodendrogliomas, one low-grade oligoastrocytoma, one Grade 4 astrocytoma, and one metastatic adenocarcinoma) underwent DT imaging examinations prior to tumor excision. Anatomical information about white matter tract location, orientation, and projections was obtained in every patient. Depending on the tumor type and location, evidence of white matter tract edema (two patients), infiltration (two patients), displacement (five patients), and disruption (two patients) could be assessed with the aid of DT imaging in each case.

Conclusions. Diffusion-tensor imaging allowed for visualization of white matter tracts and was found to be beneficial in the surgical planning for patients with intrinsic brain tumors. The authors' experience with DT imaging indicates that anatomically intact fibers may be present in abnormal-appearing areas of the brain. Whether resection of these involved fibers results in subtle postoperative neurological deficits requires further systematic study.

Full access

Roham Moftakhar and Gregory R. Trost

The development of anterior cervical plates (ACPs) represents a rapidly changing aspect of spine surgery. This paper focuses on a historical overview of ACPs. The authors discuss the disadvantages of earlier generations of plates and demonstrate how current plates have been designed to overcome the presumed shortcomings of their predecessors.

This historical review begins with the earliest plates—unrestricted backout plates—and moves on to newer plates—restricted backout plates and their different subcategories.

Virtually all modern ACPs work equally well in cervical stabilization; however, there are differences in design that warrant future studies to understand the long-term performances of different plates.

Full access

Roham Moftakhar, Howard A. Rowley, Aquilla Turk, David B. Niemann, Beverly Aagaard Kienitz, Jamie Van Gomple and Mustafa K. Başkaya

Object

Digital subtraction (DS) angiography is the gold standard for detecting cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Computed tomography (CT) perfusion is a recently developed modality for the evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of using CT perfusion to detect vasospasm in patients with SAH.

Methods

Fourteen patients between the ages of 41 and 66 years with aneurysmal SAH underwent 23 CT perfusion scans for suspected vasospasm. All patients underwent DS angiography within 12 hours of the CT perfusion scans. The presence of vasospasm on CT perfusion images was determined based on qualitative reading using color maps of mean transit time, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral blood volume as criteria. The presence or absence of vasospasm as retrospectively determined using CT perfusion was compared with DS angiography findings.

Of the 23 CT perfusion scans performed, 21 (91%) were concordant with angiography findings in predicting the presence or absence of vasospasm. In 15 of 23 scans, the presence of vasospasm was detected on CT perfusion scans and confirmed on DS angiography studies. In two cases, vasospasm was revealed on DS angiography but was not confirmed on CT perfusion. The degree of agreement between CT perfusion and DS angiography for detection of vasospasm was high (κ = 0.8, p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

Computed tomography perfusion is an accurate, reliable, and noninvasive method to detect the presence or absence of vasospasm. It can be used as a tool to help guide the decision to pursue DS angiography with the intent to treat vasospasm.

Restricted access

Stacey Quintero Wolfe, Hamad Farhat, Mohamed Samy Elhammady, Roham Moftakhar and Mohammad Ali Aziz-Sultan

A 2-month-old infant presented with an enlarging scalp hemangioma and consumptive coagulopathy. The patient became severely thrombocytopenic despite medical treatment. Transarterial embolization with Onyx was performed with significant reduction in the size of the tumor and complete resolution of the thrombocytopenia within 12 hours. Onyx embolization appears to be an excellent treatment option for hemangiomas presenting with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome that are unresponsive to standard medical therapy.

Restricted access

Mohamed Samy Elhammady, Stacey Quintero Wolfe, Hamad Farhat, Roham Moftakhar and Mohammad Ali Aziz-Sultan

Object

The authors conducted a study to determine the safety and efficacy of embolization of carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) with the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx.

Methods

They prospectively collected data in all patients with CCFs who underwent Onyx-based embolization at their institution over a 3-year period. The type of fistula, route of embolization, viscosity of Onyx, additional use of coils, extent of embolization, procedural complications, and clinical follow-up were recorded.

Results

A total of 12 patients (5 men and 7 women who were age 24–88 years) underwent embolization in which Onyx was used. There were 1 Barrow Type A, 1 Type B, 3 Type C, and 7 Type D fistulas. Embolization was performed via a transvenous route in 8 cases and a transarterial route in 4 cases. Onyx 34 was used in all but 2 cases: a direct Type A fistula embolized with Onyx 500 and an indirect Type C fistula embolized with Onyx 18. Adjuvant embolization with framing coils was performed in 7 cases. All procedures were completed in a single session. Immediate fistula obliteration was achieved in all cases. Clinical resolution of presenting symptoms occurred in 100% of the patients by 2 months. Neurological complications occurred in 3 patients. One patient developed a complete cranial nerve (CN) VII palsy that has not resolved. Two patients developed transient neuropathies—1 a Horner syndrome and partial CN VI palsy, and 1 a complete CN III and partial CN V palsy. Radiographic follow-up (mean 16 months, range 4–35 months) was available in 6 patients with complete resolution of the lesion in all.

Conclusions

Onyx is a liquid embolic agent that is effective in the treatment of CCFs but not without hazards. Postembolization cavernous sinus thrombosis and swelling may result in transient compressive cranial neuropathies. The inherent gradual polymerization properties of Onyx allow for casting of the cavernous sinus but may potentially result in deep penetration within arterial collaterals that can cause CN ischemia/infarction. Although not proven, the angiotoxic effects of dimethyl sulfoxide may also play a role in postembolization CN deficits.

Restricted access

Mohamed Samy Elhammady, Stacey Quintero Wolfe, Ramsey Ashour, Hamad Farhat, Roham Moftakhar, Baruch B. Lieber and Mohammad Ali Aziz-Sultan

Object

The authors assessed the safety and efficacy of embolization of head, neck, and spinal tumors with Onyx and determined the correlation between tumor embolization and intraoperative blood loss.

Methods

The authors prospectively collected all head, neck, and spinal tumors embolized with Onyx at their institution over a 28-month period. Information on tumor type, location, extent of tumor devascularization, endovascular and surgical complications, and intraoperative estimated blood loss (EBL) was evaluated.

Results

Forty-three patients with various head, neck, and spinal lesions underwent vascular tumor embolization with Onyx. Indications for embolization included uncontrolled tumor bleeding in 8 cases, elective preoperative devascularization in 34, and tumor-induced consumptive thrombocytopenia in 1 case. Embolization was performed via direct tumoral puncture in 14 cases and through the traditional transarterial route in the remaining lesions. Embolization was successful in ending uncontrolled tumor bleeding in all 8 cases and in reversing the consumptive coagulopathy in 1 case. Intraparenchymal penetration of embolic material was possible in all percutaneously embolized tumors and in 4 of the 20 tumors embolized preoperatively via the transarterial route. The mean percentage of devascularization in tumors with intraparenchymal penetration of Onyx was 90.3% compared with 83.7% in tumors without intraparenchymal penetration. The mean EBL with intraparenchymal penetration of Onyx was significantly lower than when there was no intraparenchymal penetration (459 vs 2698 ml; p = 0.0067). There were no neurological complications related to the embolization procedures.

Conclusions

Embolization of vascular tumors with Onyx can be performed safely but may not reach optimal effectiveness in reducing intraoperative EBL if the embolic material does not penetrate the tumor vasculature. In the authors' experience, the best method of intraparenchymal penetration is achieved with direct tumor puncture. Transarterial embolization may not result in tumor penetration, particularly when injected from a long distance through small caliber or slow flow vessels.

Restricted access

Stacey Quintero Wolfe, Hamad Farhat, Roham Moftakhar, Mohamed Samy Elhammady and Mohammad Ali Aziz-Sultan

Endovascular obliteration of wide-necked aneurysms may be precluded by the inability to navigate across the aneurysm neck. The authors present a technique in which a Hyperform balloon is inflated within the aneurysm and used as a contact surface to “bounce” the remodeling balloon across the aneurysm neck. They have successfully used this technique in 3 patients to efficiently overcome vessel tortuosity, aneurysmal dead space, and balloon prolapse, allowing for obliteration of large, wide-necked aneurysms.

Restricted access

Mohammad Ali Aziz-Sultan, Roham Moftakhar, Stacey Quintero Wolfe, Mohamed Samy Elhammady, Björn Herman and Hamad Farhat

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are vascular tumors that may make resection difficult and potentially dangerous. Preoperative embolization is frequently used to decrease surgical morbidity and blood loss. Embolization has typically been performed via a transarterial route using a variety of embolic materials. The authors present a case in which endoscopic assistance was used for direct transnasal tumor puncture and intratumoral embolization using the liquid embolic agent Onyx. In this case there was excellent infiltration of the parenchymal vasculature with complete angiographic obliteration. There were no complications related to the embolization. The tumor was resected with minimal blood loss. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no previous reports of this novel direct intratumoral embolization technique using endoscopic guidance.

Restricted access

Christina A. Markunas, R. Shane Tubbs, Roham Moftakhar, Allison E. Ashley-Koch, Simon G. Gregory, W. Jerry Oakes, Marcy C. Speer and Bermans J. Iskandar

Object

Although Chiari Type I (CM-I) and Type 0 (CM-0) malformations have been previously characterized clinically and radiologically, there have been no studies focusing on the possible genetic link between these disorders. The goal of this study was to identify families in whom CM-0 and CM-I co-occurred and to further assess the similarities between these disorders.

Methods

Families were ascertained through a proband with CM-I. Detailed family histories were obtained to identify first-degree relatives diagnosed with CM-0. Several criteria were used to exclude individuals with acquired forms of CM-I and/or syringomyelia. Individuals were excluded with syndromic, traumatic, infectious, or tumor-related syringomyelia, as well as CM-I due to a supratentorial mass, hydrocephalus, history of cervical or cranial surgery unrelated to CM-I, or development of symptoms following placement of a lumbar shunt. Medical records and MR images were used to characterize CM-I and CM-0 individuals clinically and radiologically.

Results

Five families were identified in which the CM-I proband had a first-degree relative with CM-0. Further assessment of affected individuals showed similar clinical and radiological features between CM-0 and CM-I individuals, although CM-I patients in general had more severe symptoms and skull base abnormalities than their CM-0 relatives. Overall, both groups showed improvement in symptoms and/or syrinx size following craniocervical decompression surgery.

Conclusions

There is accumulating evidence suggesting that CM-0 and CM-I may be caused by a common underlying developmental mechanism. The data in this study are consistent with this hypothesis, showing similar clinical and radiological features between CM-0 and CM-I individuals, as well as the occurrence of both disorders within families. Familial clustering of CM-0 and CM-I suggests that these disorders may share an underlying genetic basis, although additional epigenetic and/or environmental factors are likely to play an important role in the development of CM-0 versus CM-I.

Free access

Lee A. Tan, Carter S. Gerard, Sumeet K. Ahuja and Roham Moftakhar

Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) lesions account for up to 10% of all intracranial tumors. The most common CPA lesions are vestibular schwannomas (70–80%), meningiomas (10–15%) and epidermoid cysts (5%). CPA tumors are estimated to be the secondary cause for up to 9.9% patients with trigeminal neuralgia. We demonstrate a case of medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia caused by a CPA meningioma that was successfully treated via retrosigmoid approach. The patient had immediate and dramatic symptomatic improvement after surgery. Detailed surgical techniques of retrosigmoid craniotomy and tumor dissection are presented in high definition video with narration.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/55j9QCQEsH8.