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Nicholas C. Bambakidis, Jeffrey L. Sunshine, Peter F. Faulhaber, Rober W. Tarr, Warren R. Selman and Robert A. Ratcheson

Detailed knowledge of the angioarchitecture of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is necessary in determining the optimal timing and method of treatment of these challenging lesions. Many techniques are available for studying the functionality of surrounding cortical structures of AVMs. These include the use of positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, magnetoencephalography, and direct provocative testing of cortical function. The use of these methods to determine flow dynamics and tissue perfusion is also reviewed. These techniques are discussed in the present study, and their judicious utilization will enhance the safety of AVM therapy.

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Philip M. Meyers, H. Christian Schumacher, Michael J. Alexander, Colin P. Derdeyn, Anthony J. Furlan, Randall T. Higashida, Christopher J. Moran, Robert W. Tarr, Donald V. Heck, Joshua A. Hirsch, Mary E. Jensen, Italo Linfante, Cameron G. McDougall, Gary M. Nesbit, Peter A. Rasmussen, Thomas A. Tomsick, Lawrence R. Wechsler, John A. Wilson and Osama O. Zaidat

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, Canada, Europe, and Japan. According to the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association, there are now 750,000 new strokes that occur each year, resulting in 200,000 deaths, or 1 of every 16 deaths, per year in the USA alone. Endovascular therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke is an area of intense investigation. The American Stroke Association has given a qualified endorsement of intraarterial thrombolysis in selected patients. Intraarterial thrombolysis has been studied in two randomized trials and numerous case series. Although two devices have been granted FDA approval with an indication for mechanical stroke thrombectomy, none of these thrombectomy devices has demonstrated efficacy for the improvement of patient outcomes. The purpose of the present document is to define what constitutes adequate training to perform neuroendovascular procedures in patients with acute ischemic stroke and what performance standards should be adopted to assess outcomes. These guidelines have been written and approved by multiple neuroscience societies which historically have been directly involved in the medical, surgical and endovascular care of patients with acute stroke. The participating member organizations of the Neurovascular Coalition involved in the writing and endorsement of this document are the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, the American Academy of Neurology, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Cerebrovascular Section, and the Society of Vascular & Interventional Neurology.