Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: Robert S. Fisher x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Christian P. DiPaola, Nicolas Dea, Marcel F. Dvorak, Robert S. Lee, Dennis Hartig, and Charles G. Fisher

Object

Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events.

Methods

A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events.

Results

There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents.

Conclusions

The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon tuition, and/or travel expenses. The results of this study should help form the basis of policy and continued efforts at surgeon-industry COI management.

Restricted access

Melanie G. Hayden Gephart, Robert M. Lober, Robert T. Arrigo, Corinna C. Zygourakis, Raphael Guzman, Maxwell Boakye, Michael S. B. Edwards, and Paul G. Fisher

Object

Pediatric primary spinal cord tumors (PSCTs) are rare, with limited comprehensive data regarding incidence and patterns of diagnosis and treatment. The authors evaluated trends in the diagnosis and treatment of PSCTs using a nationwide database.

Methods

The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry was queried for the years 1975–2007, evaluating clinical patterns in 330 patients 19 years of age or younger in whom a pediatric PSCT had been diagnosed. Histological diagnoses were grouped into pilocytic astrocytoma, other low-grade astrocytoma, ependymoma, and high-grade glioma. Patient demographics, tumor pathology, use of external beam radiation (EBR), and overall survival were analyzed.

Results

The incidence of pediatric PSCT was 0.09 case per 100,000 person-years and did not change over time. Males were more commonly affected than females (58% vs 42%, respectively; p < 0.006). Over the last 3 decades, the specific diagnoses of pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma increased, whereas the use of EBR decreased (60.6% from 1975 to 1989 vs 31.3% from 1990 to 2007; p < 0.0001). The 5- and 10-year survival rates did not differ between these time periods.

Conclusions

While the incidence of pediatric PSCT has not changed over time, the pattern of pathological diagnoses has shifted, and pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma have been increasingly diagnosed. The use of EBR over time has declined. Relative survival of patients with low-grade PSCT has remained high regardless of the pathological diagnosis.

Full access

Christoph J. Griessenauer, Robert M. Starke, Paul M. Foreman, Philipp Hendrix, Mark R. Harrigan, Winfield S. Fisher III, Nilesh A. Vyas, Robert H. Lipsky, Mingkuan Lin, Beverly C. Walters, Jean-Francois Pittet, and Mali Mathru

OBJECTIVE

Endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, and its receptors may be involved in the pathogenesis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), clinical vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), and functional outcome following aSAH. In the present study, common endothelin single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their relation to aSAH were evaluated.

METHODS

Blood samples from all patients enrolled in the Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System (CARAS) study were used for genetic evaluation. The CARAS study prospectively enrolled patients with aSAH at 2 academic institutions in the US from 2012 to 2015. Common endothelin SNPs were detected using 5′ exonnuclease (TaqMan) genotyping assays. Analysis of associations between endothelin SNPs and aSAH and its clinical sequelae was performed.

RESULTS

Samples from 149 patients with aSAH and 50 controls were available for analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the TG (odds ratio [OR] 2.102, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.048–4.218, p = 0.036) and TT genotypes (OR 7.884, 95% CI 1.003–61.995, p = 0.05) of the endothelin-1 T/G SNP (rs1800541) were significantly associated with aSAH. There was a dominant effect of the G allele (CG/GG genotypes; OR 4.617, 95% CI 1.311–16.262, p = 0.017) of the endothelin receptor A G/C SNP (rs5335) on clinical vasospasm. Endothelin SNPs were not associated with DCI or functional outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

Common endothelin SNPs were found to be associated with presentation with aSAH and clinical vasospasm. Further studies are required to elucidate the relevant pathophysiology and its potential implications in the treatment of patients with aSAH.

Restricted access

Elizabeth N. Alford, Lauren E. Rotman, Matthew S. Erwood, Robert A. Oster, Matthew C. Davis, H. Bruce C. Pittman, H. Evan Zeiger, and Winfield S. Fisher III

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to describe the development of a novel prognostic score, the Subdural Hematoma in the Elderly (SHE) score. The SHE score is intended to predict 30-day mortality in elderly patients (those > 65 years of age) with an acute, chronic, or mixed-density subdural hematoma (SDH) after minor, or no, prior trauma.

METHODS

The authors used the Prognosis Research Strategy group methods to develop the clinical prediction model. The training data set included patients with acute, chronic, and mixed-density SDH. Based on multivariate analyses from a large data set, in addition to review of the extant literature, 3 components to the score were selected: age, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and SDH volume. Patients are given 1 point if they are over 80 years old, 1 point for an admission GCS score of 5–12, 2 points for an admission GCS score of 3–4, and 1 point for SDH volume > 50 ml. The sum of points across all categories determines the SHE score.

RESULTS

The 30-day mortality rate steadily increased as the SHE score increased for all SDH acuities. For patients with an acute SDH, the 30-day mortality rate was 3.2% for SHE score of 0, and the rate increased to 13.1%, 32.7%, 95.7%, and 100% for SHE scores of 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The model was most accurate for acute SDH (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.94), although it still performed well for chronic (AUC = 0.80) and mixed-density (AUC = 0.87) SDH.

CONCLUSIONS

The SHE score is a simple clinical grading scale that accurately stratifies patients’ risk of mortality based on age, admission GCS score, and SDH volume. Use of the SHE score could improve counseling of patients and their families, allow for standardization of clinical treatment protocols, and facilitate clinical research studies in SDH.

Full access

Paul M. Foreman, Michelle Chua, Mark R. Harrigan, Winfield S. Fisher III, Nilesh A. Vyas, Robert H. Lipsky, Beverly C. Walters, R. Shane Tubbs, Mohammadali M. Shoja, and Christoph J. Griessenauer

OBJECTIVE

Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a recognized complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) that contributes to poor outcome. This study seeks to determine the effect of nosocomial infection on the incidence of DCI and patient outcome.

METHODS

An exploratory analysis was performed on 156 patients with aSAH enrolled in the Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System study. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with univariate analysis to detect risk factors for the development of DCI and poor outcome. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of DCI.

RESULTS

One hundred fifty-three patients with aSAH were included. DCI was identified in 32 patients (20.9%). Nosocomial infection (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–11.2, p = 0.04), ventriculitis (OR 25.3, 95% CI 1.39–458.7, p = 0.03), aneurysm re-rupture (OR 7.55, 95% CI 1.02–55.7, p = 0.05), and clinical vasospasm (OR 43.4, 95% CI 13.1–143.4, p < 0.01) were independently associated with the development of DCI. Diagnosis of nosocomial infection preceded the diagnosis of DCI in 15 (71.4%) of 21 patients. Patients diagnosed with nosocomial infection experienced significantly worse outcomes as measured by the modified Rankin Scale score at discharge and 1 year (p < 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Nosocomial infection is independently associated with DCI. This association is hypothesized to be partly causative through the exacerbation of systemic inflammation leading to thrombosis and subsequent ischemia.

Restricted access

Michael C. Jin, Jonathon J. Parker, Michael Zhang, Zack A. Medress, Casey H. Halpern, Gordon Li, John K. Ratliff, Gerald A. Grant, Robert S. Fisher, and Stephen Skirboll

OBJECTIVE

Status epilepticus (SE) is associated with significant mortality, cost, and risk of future seizures. In one of the first studies of SE after neurosurgery, the authors assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of postneurosurgical SE (PNSE).

METHODS

Neurosurgical admissions from the MarketScan Claims and Encounters database (2007 through 2015) were assessed in a longitudinal cross-sectional sample of privately insured patients who underwent qualifying cranial procedures in the US and were older than 18 years of age. The incidence of early (in-hospital) and late (postdischarge readmission) SE and associated mortality was assessed. Procedural, pathological, demographic, and anatomical covariates parameterized multivariable logistic regression and Cox models. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to study the incidence of early and late PNSE. A risk-stratification simulation was performed, combining individual predictors into singular risk estimates.

RESULTS

A total of 197,218 admissions (218,217 procedures) were identified. Early PNSE occurred during 637 (0.32%) of 197,218 admissions for cranial neurosurgical procedures. A total of 1045 (0.56%) cases of late PNSE were identified after 187,771 procedure admissions with nonhospice postdischarge follow-up. After correction for comorbidities, craniotomy for trauma, hematoma, or elevated intracranial pressure was associated with increased risk of early PNSE (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.538, 95% CI 1.183–1.999). Craniotomy for meningioma resection was associated with an increased risk of early PNSE compared with resection of metastases and parenchymal primary brain tumors (aOR 2.701, 95% CI 1.388–5.255). Craniotomies for infection or abscess (aHR 1.447, 95% CI 1.016–2.061) and CSF diversion (aHR 1.307, 95% CI 1.076–1.587) were associated with highest risk of late PNSE. Use of continuous electroencephalography in patients with early (p < 0.005) and late (p < 0.001) PNSE rose significantly over the study time period. The simulation regression model predicted that patients at high risk for early PNSE experienced a 1.10% event rate compared with those at low risk (0.07%). Similarly, patients predicted to be at highest risk for late PNSE were significantly more likely to eventually develop late PNSE than those at lowest risk (HR 54.16, 95% CI 24.99–104.80).

CONCLUSIONS

Occurrence of early and late PNSE was associated with discrete neurosurgical pathologies and increased mortality. These data provide a framework for prospective validation of clinical and perioperative risk factors and indicate patients for heightened diagnostic suspicion of PNSE.

Full access

Christoph J. Griessenauer, R. Shane Tubbs, Paul M. Foreman, Michelle H. Chua, Nilesh A. Vyas, Robert H. Lipsky, Mingkuan Lin, Ramaswamy Iyer, Rishikesh Haridas, Beverly C. Walters, Salman Chaudry, Aisana Malieva, Samantha Wilkins, Mark R. Harrigan, Winfield S. Fisher III, and Mohammadali M. Shoja

OBJECTIVE

Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genetic polymorphisms are thought to play a role in cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture. The Cerebral Aneurysm Renin-Angiotensin System (CARAS) study prospectively evaluated common RAS polymorphisms and their relation to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH).

METHODS

The CARAS study prospectively enrolled aSAH patients and controls at 2 academic centers in the United States. A blood sample was obtained from all patients for genetic evaluation and measurement of plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) concentration. Common RAS polymorphisms were detected using 5′ exonuclease (TaqMan) genotyping assays and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

RESULTS

Two hundred forty-eight patients were screened, and 149 aSAH patients and 50 controls were available for analysis. There was a recessive effect of the C allele of the angiotensinogen (AGT) C/T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (OR 1.94, 95% CI 0.912–4.12, p = 0.0853) and a dominant effect of the G allele of the angiotensin II receptor Type 2 (AT2) G/A SNP (OR 2.11, 95% CI 0.972–4.57, p = 0.0590) on aSAH that did not reach statistical significance after adjustment for potential confounders. The ACE level was significantly lower in aSAH patients with the II genotype (17.6 ± 8.0 U/L) as compared with the ID (22.5 ± 12.1 U/L) and DD genotypes (26.6 ± 14.2 U/L) (p = 0.0195).

CONCLUSIONS

The AGT C/T and AT2 G/A polymorphisms were not significantly associated with aSAH after controlling for potential confounders. However, a strong trend was identified for a dominant effect of the G allele of the AT2 G/A SNP. Downregulation of the local RAS may contribute to the formation of cerebral aneurysms and subsequent presentation with aSAH. Further studies are required to elucidate the relevant pathophysiology and its potential implication in treatment of patients with aSAH.

Full access

Philipp Hendrix, Paul M. Foreman, Mark R. Harrigan, Winfield S. Fisher III, Nilesh A. Vyas, Robert H. Lipsky, Mingkuan Lin, Beverly C. Walters, R. Shane Tubbs, Mohammadali M. Shoja, Jean-Francois Pittet, Mali Mathru, and Christoph J. Griessenauer

OBJECTIVE

Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is involved in homocysteine and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) metabolism. Both products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases. The impact of CBS polymorphisms on aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and its clinical sequelae is poorly understood.

METHODS

Blood samples from all patients enrolled in the CARAS (Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System) study were used for genetic evaluation. The CARAS study prospectively enrolled aSAH patients at 2 academic institutions in the United States from 2012 to 2015. Common CBS polymorphisms were detected using 5′exonuclease genotyping assays. Analysis of associations between CBS polymorphisms and aSAH was performed.

RESULTS

Samples from 149 aSAH patients and 50 controls were available for analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the insertion allele of the 844ins68 CBS insertion polymorphism showed a dominant effect on aSAH. The GG genotype of the CBS G/A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs234706) was independently associated with unfavorable functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale Score 3–6) at discharge and last follow-up, but not clinical vasospasm or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI).

CONCLUSIONS

The insertion allele of the 844ins68 CBS insertion polymorphism was independently associated with aSAH while the GG genotype of rs234706 was associated with an unfavorable outcome both at discharge and last follow-up. Increased CBS activity may exert its neuroprotective effects through alteration of H2S levels, and independent of clinical vasospasm and DCI.

Full access

Christoph J. Griessenauer, R. Shane Tubbs, Paul M. Foreman, Michelle H. Chua, Nilesh A. Vyas, Robert H. Lipsky, Mingkuan Lin, Ramaswamy Iyer, Rishikesh Haridas, Beverly C. Walters, Salman Chaudry, Aisana Malieva, Samantha Wilkins, Mark R. Harrigan, Winfield S. Fisher III, and Mohammadali M. Shoja

OBJECTIVE

Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genetic polymorphisms are thought to play a role in cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture. The Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System (CARAS) study prospectively evaluated associations of common RAS polymorphisms and clinical course after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH).

METHODS

The CARAS study prospectively enrolled aSAH patients at 2 academic centers in the United States. A blood sample was obtained from all patients for genetic evaluation and measurement of plasma angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) concentration. Common RAS polymorphisms were detected using 5′exonuclease genotyping assays and pyrosequencing. Analysis of associations of RAS polymorphisms and clinical course after aSAH were performed.

RESULTS

A total of 166 patients were screened, and 149 aSAH patients were included for analysis. A recessive effect of allele I (insertion) of the ACE I/D (insertion/deletion) polymorphism was identified for Hunt and Hess grade in all patients (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.17–6.50; p = 0.0206) with subsequent poor functional outcome. There was a similar effect on delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients 55 years or younger (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.04–12.7; p = 0.0439). In patients older than 55 years, there was a recessive effect of allele A of the angiotensin II receptor Type 2 (AT2) A/C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on DCI (OR 4.70, 95% CI 1.43–15.4; p = 0.0111).

CONCLUSIONS

Both the ACE I/D polymorphism and the AT2 A/C single nucleotide polymorphism were associated with an age-dependent risk of delayed cerebral ischemia, whereas only the ACE I/D polymorphism was associated with poor clinical grade at presentation. Further studies are required to elucidate the relevant pathophysiology and its potential implication in the treatment of patients with aSAH.