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Robert G. Ojemann

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Robert G. Ojemann

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Robert G. Ojemann

✓ With the announcement that Harvey Cushing is to be honored by a United States postage stamp in the Great American stamp series, the qualities that this remarkable man possessed are reviewed — artist, author, bibliophile, scientist, soldier, physician, and teacher. The events that led to Cushing becoming a neurosurgeon are summarized. The recognition by the United States Postal Service of physicians and others who have appeared on stamps that had some relationship to Cushing's activities is discussed. Based on the tradition of Harvey Cushing, eight guidelines are presented.

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Basal rupture of saccular aneurysm

A pathological case report

C. Miller Fisher and Robert G. Ojemann

✓ In a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the arteries of the circle of Willis were left undisturbed and undissected at postmortem examination. A block of frontal lobe tissue with the attached vessels was serially sectioned disclosing in its entirety a saccular aneurysm that had ruptured at the base rather than the dome. The histology of the hemostatic process was clearly depicted.

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Robert G. Ojemann and Paul F. J. New

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Christopher S. Ogilvy and Robert G. Ojemann

✓ A safe technique is described for performing a lateral posterior fossa craniotomy to gain access to the cerebellopontine angle. The method makes use of currently available high-speed air drills. Thus, it is possible to replace the removed bone at the conclusion of the procedure and to re-establish normal tissue planes while providing rigid protection to the posterior fossa.

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Bradford B. Walters, Robert G. Ojemann and Roberto C. Heros

✓ A retrospective review of carotid endarterectomies performed by the Neurosurgical Service at Massachusetts General Hospital from July, 1976, through December, 1985, disclosed 64 procedures that were performed on an emergency basis. The patients included 40 men and 24 women, with a mean age of 64 years (range 32 to 87 years). Correlation of angiographic findings with outcome revealed that of the 27 patients with severe stenosis, usually with delay in blood flow, 25 (93%) were the same or improved postoperatively; of the 11 patients with stenosis and an intraluminal filling defect (six of whom had an intraluminal clot), eight (73%) were the same or improved after surgery; of the 16 patients with complete occlusion, 14 (88%) were the same or improved (backflow was established in all cases); and of the 10 patients with moderate to severe stenosis and/or severe ulceration (including three with transient ischemic attacks who were receiving heparin), eight (80%) were the same or improved.

Pre- and postoperative clinical status were graded into five categories: intact; mild deficit; moderate deficit (significant impairment but able to perform activities of daily living); severe deficit (requiring assistance for daily activities); and death. Of the 36 patients who preoperatively were intact or had mild deficits, 33 (92%) were the same or improved postoperatively, three were worse, and there were no deaths. Among 15 patients presenting with moderate deficits, 12 (80%) were the same or improved, two were worse, and one died. Of the 13 patients with severe deficits, 10 (77%) were the same or improved and three died. Two patients with sudden severe deficits associated with loss of contralateral bruit were operated on without angiography and were intact postoperatively. Of the four deaths in the total series, two were attributed to cardiac causes and two to unrelated disease processes. The indications for emergency carotid endarterectomy are discussed.