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Surya Sri Krishna Gour, Mohit Agrawal and Dattaraj Sawarkar

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Robert E. Gross, Wendy J. Lombardi, William D. Hutchison, Soni Narula, Jean A. Saint-Cyr, Jonathan O. Dostrovsky, Ronald R. Tasker, Anthony E. Lang and Andres M. Lozano

Object. To understand the factors that determine the distribution of lesions after microelectrode-guided pallidotomy for Parkinson's disease, the authors quantitatively characterized lesion location in a cohort of patients who were prospectively followed to determine the effects of pallidotomy on clinical outcome.

Methods. Thirty-three patients underwent volumetric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after surgery to allow quantitative lesion localization in relation to conventional intraventricular landmarks and, alternatively, more anatomically relevant landmarks. The validity of the method was verified in a cohort of postpallidotomy patients who underwent concurrent volumetric and stereotactic MR imaging in an external head frame. Lesions were distributed over a considerable distance in the anteroposterior (8.8 mm) and mediolateral (8.7 mm) dimensions in relation to the anterior commissure and wall of the third ventricle, respectively. Less variation was seen in lesion location in the dorsoventral dimension (4.8 mm) in relation to the intercommissural plane.

Conclusions. Lesion distribution was not random: lesion locations in the anteroposterior and mediolateral dimensions were highly correlated, such that lesions were distributed from anteromedial to posterolateral, parallel to the border of the globus pallidus internus with the obliquely oriented internal capsule. The factors that led to variability in lesion location were variation in third ventricle width and the oblique anteromedial-to-posterolateral course of the internal capsule. This demonstration of variability of lesion location in a cohort of patients who experienced excellent clinical benefits and minimal postoperative complications emphasizes the importance of anatomical variations in determining lesion position and the need for physiological corroboration for correct lesion placement.

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Irene Mathijssen, Robbin de Goederen, Sarah L. Versnel, Koen F. M. Joosten, Marie-Lise C. van Veelen and Robert C. Tasker

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Martijn J. Cornelissen, Robbin de Goederen, Priya Doerga, Iris Cuperus, Marie-Lise van Veelen, Maarten Lequin, Paul Govaert, Irene M. J. Mathijssen, Jeroen Dudink and Robert C. Tasker

OBJECTIVE

In addition to craniocerebral disproportion, other factors, such as Chiari malformation type I, obstructive sleep apnea, and venous outflow obstruction, are considered to have a role in the occurrence of intracranial hypertension in craniosynostosis. This pilot study examined cerebral venous flow velocity to better characterize the complex intracranial venous physiology of craniosynostosis.

METHODS

The authors performed a prospective cohort study of craniosynostosis patients (n = 34) referred to a single national (tertiary) craniofacial unit. Controls (n = 28) consisted of children who were referred to the unit’s outpatient clinic and did not have craniosynostosis. Transfontanelle ultrasound scans with venous Doppler flow velocity assessment were performed at the first outpatient clinic visit and after each surgery, if applicable. Mean venous blood flow velocities of the internal cerebral vein (ICVv) and the superior sagittal sinus (SSSv) were recorded and blood flow waveform was scored.

RESULTS

Preoperatively, SSSv was decreased in craniosynostosis patients compared with controls (7.57 vs 11.31 cm/sec, p = 0.009). ICVv did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Postoperatively, SSSv increased significantly (7.99 vs 10.66 cm/sec, p = 0.023). Blood flow waveform analyses did not differ significantly between patients and controls.

CONCLUSIONS

Premature closure of cranial sutures was associated with decreased SSSv but not ICVv; indicating an effect on the superficial rather than deep venous drainage. Further Doppler ultrasound studies are needed to test the hypothesis that at an early stage of craniosynostosis pathology SSSv, but not pulsatility, is abnormal, and that abnormality in both SSSv and the superficial venous waveform reflect a more advanced stage of evolution in suture closure.

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Andrea Fanelli, Frederick W. Vonberg, Kerri L. LaRovere, Brian K. Walsh, Edward R. Smith, Shenandoah Robinson, Robert C. Tasker and Thomas Heldt

OBJECTIVE

In the search for a reliable, cooperation-independent, noninvasive alternative to invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in children, various approaches have been proposed, but at the present time none are capable of providing fully automated, real-time, calibration-free, continuous and accurate ICP estimates. The authors investigated the feasibility and validity of simultaneously monitored arterial blood pressure (ABP) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) waveforms to derive noninvasive ICP (nICP) estimates.

METHODS

Invasive ICP and ABP recordings were collected from 12 pediatric and young adult patients (aged 2–25 years) undergoing such monitoring as part of routine clinical care. Additionally, simultaneous transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography–based MCA CBFV waveform measurements were performed at the bedside in dedicated data collection sessions. The ABP and MCA CBFV waveforms were analyzed in the context of a mathematical model, linking them to the cerebral vasculature’s biophysical properties and ICP. The authors developed and automated a waveform preprocessing, signal-quality evaluation, and waveform-synchronization “pipeline” in order to test and objectively validate the algorithm’s performance. To generate one nICP estimate, 60 beats of ABP and MCA CBFV waveform data were analyzed. Moving the 60-beat data window forward by one beat at a time (overlapping data windows) resulted in 39,480 ICP-to-nICP comparisons across a total of 44 data-collection sessions (studies). Moving the 60-beat data window forward by 60 beats at a time (nonoverlapping data windows) resulted in 722 paired ICP-to-nICP comparisons.

RESULTS

Greater than 80% of all nICP estimates fell within ± 7 mm Hg of the reference measurement. Overall performance in the nonoverlapping data window approach gave a mean error (bias) of 1.0 mm Hg, standard deviation of the error (precision) of 5.1 mm Hg, and root-mean-square error of 5.2 mm Hg. The associated mean and median absolute errors were 4.2 mm Hg and 3.3 mm Hg, respectively. These results were contingent on ensuring adequate ABP and CBFV signal quality and required accurate hydrostatic pressure correction of the measured ABP waveform in relation to the elevation of the external auditory meatus. Notably, the procedure had no failed attempts at data collection, and all patients had adequate TCD data from at least one hemisphere. Last, an analysis of using study-by-study averaged nICP estimates to detect a measured ICP > 15 mm Hg resulted in an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.83, with a sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 86% for a detection threshold of nICP = 15 mm Hg.

CONCLUSIONS

This nICP estimation algorithm, based on ABP and bedside TCD CBFV waveform measurements, performs in a manner comparable to invasive ICP monitoring. These findings open the possibility for rational, point-of-care treatment decisions in pediatric patients with suspected raised ICP undergoing intensive care.

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Shenandoah Robinson, Jesse L. Winer, Justin Berkner, Lindsay A. S. Chan, Jesse L. Denson, Jessie R. Maxwell, Yirong Yang, Laurel O. Sillerud, Robert C. Tasker, William P. Meehan III, Rebekah Mannix and Lauren L. Jantzie

OBJECTIVE

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity for otherwise healthy full-term infants around the world. Currently, the primary treatment for infant TBI is supportive, as no targeted therapies exist to actively promote recovery. The developing infant brain, in particular, has a unique response to injury and the potential for repair, both of which vary with maturation. Targeted interventions and objective measures of therapeutic efficacy are needed in this special population. The authors hypothesized that MRI and serum biomarkers can be used to quantify outcomes following infantile TBI in a preclinical rat model and that the potential efficacy of the neuro-reparative agent erythropoietin (EPO) in promoting recovery can be tested using these biomarkers as surrogates for functional outcomes.

METHODS

With institutional approval, a controlled cortical impact (CCI) was delivered to postnatal Day (P)12 rats of both sexes (76 rats). On postinjury Day (PID)1, the 49 CCI rats designated for chronic studies were randomized to EPO (3000 U/kg/dose, CCI-EPO, 24 rats) or vehicle (CCI-veh, 25 rats) administered intraperitoneally on PID1–4, 6, and 8. Acute injury (PID3) was evaluated with an immunoassay of injured cortex and serum, and chronic injury (PID13–28) was evaluated with digitized gait analyses, MRI, and serum immunoassay. The CCI-veh and CCI-EPO rats were compared with shams (49 rats) primarily using 2-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc correction.

RESULTS

Following CCI, there was 4.8% mortality and 55% of injured rats exhibited convulsions. Of the injured rats designated for chronic analyses, 8.1% developed leptomeningeal cyst–like lesions verified with MRI and were excluded from further study. On PID3, Western blot showed that EPO receptor expression was increased in the injured cortex (p = 0.008). These Western blots also showed elevated ipsilateral cortex calpain degradation products for αII-spectrin (αII-SDPs; p < 0.001), potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2-DPs; p = 0.037), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-DPs; p = 0.002), as well as serum GFAP (serum GFAP-DPs; p = 0.001). In injured rats multiplex electrochemiluminescence analyses on PID3 revealed elevated serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα p = 0.01) and chemokine (CXC) ligand 1 (CXCL1). Chronically, that is, in PID13–16 CCI-veh rats, as compared with sham rats, gait deficits were demonstrated (p = 0.033) but then were reversed (p = 0.022) with EPO treatment. Diffusion tensor MRI of the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex and white matter in PID16–23 CCI-veh rats showed widespread injury and significant abnormalities of functional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD); MD, AD, and RD improved after EPO treatment. Chronically, P13–P28 CCI-veh rats also had elevated serum CXCL1 levels, which normalized in CCI-EPO rats.

CONCLUSIONS

Efficient translation of emerging neuro-reparative interventions dictates the use of age-appropriate preclinical models with human clinical trial–compatible biomarkers. In the present study, the authors showed that CCI produced chronic gait deficits in P12 rats that resolved with EPO treatment and that chronic imaging and serum biomarkers correlated with this improvement.