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Douglas Kondziolka, Ricky Madhok, L. Dade Lunsford, David Mathieu, Juan J. Martin, Ajay Niranjan and John C. Flickinger

Object

Meningiomas of the cerebral convexity are often surgically curable because both the mass and involved dura mater can be removed. Stereotactic radiosurgery has become an important primary or adjuvant treatment for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The authors evaluated clinical and imaging outcomes in patients with convexity meningiomas after radiosurgery.

Methods

The patient cohort consisted of 125 patients with convexity meningiomas managed using radiosurgery at some point during an 18-year period. The patient series included 76 women, 55 patients who had undergone prior resection, and 6 patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2. Tumors were located in frontal (80 patients), parietal (24 patients), temporal (12 patients), and occipital (9 patients) areas. The WHO tumor grades in patients with prior resections were Grade I in 34 patients, Grade II in 15 patients, and Grade III in 6 patients. Seventy patients underwent primary radiosurgery and therefore had no prior histological tumor diagnosis. The mean tumor volume was 7.6 ml. Radiosurgery was performed using the Leksell Gamma Knife with a mean tumor margin dose of 14.2 Gy.

Results

Serial imaging was evaluated in 115 patients (92%). After primary radiosurgery, the tumor control rate was 92%. After adjuvant radiosurgery, the control rate was 97% for Grade I tumors. The actuarial tumor control rates at 3 and 5 years for the entire series were 86.1 ± 3.8% and 71.6 ± 8.6%, respectively. For patients with benign tumors (Grade I) and those without prior surgery, the actuarial tumor control rate was 95.3 ± 2.3% and 85.8 ± 9.3%, respectively. Delayed resection after radiosurgery was performed in 9 patients (7%) at an average of 35 months. No patient developed a subsequent radiation-induced tumor. The overall morbidity rate was 9.6%. Symptomatic peritumoral imaging changes compatible with edema or adverse radiation effects developed in 5%, at a mean of 8 months.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery provides satisfactory control rates either after resection or as an alternate to resection, particularly for histologically benign meningiomas. Its role is most valuable for patients whose tumors affect critical neurological regions and who are poor candidates for resection. Both temporary and permanent morbidity are related to brain location and tumor volume.

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Ricky Madhok and Adam S. Kanter

The authors present 2 cases of far-lateral lumbar disc herniations treated surgically via an extreme-lateral transpsoas approach. The procedure was performed using the MaXcess minimally invasive retractor system to access and successfully remove the disc fragments without complication. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first reported cases of using a minimally invasive retroperitoneal approach for the treatment of far-lateral disc herniations.

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Ricky Madhok, Daniel M. Prevedello, Paul Gardner, Ricardo L. Carrau, Carl H. Snyderman and Amin B. Kassam

Object

Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are benign lesions that can be diagnosed as an incidental finding associated with headaches, pituitary dysfunction, or vision deterioration. Typically, they occur in a sellar or suprasellar location. The aim of this study was to review the clinical presentation and outcomes associated with endoscopic endonasal resection of these lesions.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of 35 patients with a diagnosis of RCC after endoscopic endonasal resection at the University of Pittsburgh between January 1998 and July 2008.

Results

All 35 patients underwent a purely endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA). The average patient age was 34 years (range 12–67 years), and the average follow-up was 19 months (range 1–60 months). Clinical follow-up data were available for 32 patients, and radiographic follow-up data were accessible for 33 patients. All of the patients underwent complete removal of the cyst contents, and according to radiography studies 2 patients had a recurrence, neither of which required reoperation. The mean cyst volume was 1052.7 mm3 (range 114–6044 mm3). Headache was a presenting symptom in 26 (81.2%) of 32 patients, with 25 (96.1%) of 26 having postoperative improvement in their headaches. Fifteen (57.7%) of the 26 patients had complete pain resolution, and 10 (38.5%) had a > 50% reduction in their pain scores. Six (18.8%) of 32 patients initially presented with pituitary dysfunction, although 2 (33.3%) had postoperative improvement. Three (9.4%) of 32 patients had temporary pituitary dysfunction postoperatively, although there was no permanent pituitary dysfunction. Neither were there any intraoperative complications, postoperative CSF leaks, or new neurological deficits. The average hospital stay was 1.8 days (range 1–5 days).

Conclusions

The EEA is a safe and effective approach in the treatment of RCCs. None of the patients in this study experienced any worsening of their preoperative symptoms or pituitary function, and 96% of the patients who had presented with headache experienced complete or significant pain relief following treatment.

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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010

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Juan C. Fernandez-Miranda, Johnathan A. Engh, Sudhir K. Pathak, Ricky Madhok, Fernando E. Boada, Walter Schneider and Amin B. Kassam

The authors have applied high-definition fiber tracking (HDFT) to the resection of an intraparenchymal dermoid cyst by using a minimally invasive endoscopic port. The lesion was located within the mesial frontal lobe, septal area, hypothalamus, and suprasellar recess. Using high-dimensional (256 directions) diffusion imaging, more than 250,000 fiber tracts were imaged before and after surgery. Trajectory planning using HDFT in a computer model was used to facilitate cannulation of the cyst with the endoscopic port. Analysis of the proposed initial surgical route was overlaid onto the fiber tracts and was predicted to produce substantial disruption to prefrontal projection fibers (anterior limb of the internal capsule) and the cingulum. Adjustment of the cannulation entry point 1 cm medially was predicted to cross the corpus callosum instead of the anterior limb of the internal capsule or the cingulum. Following cyst resection performed using endoscopic port surgery, postoperative imaging demonstrated accurate cannulation of the lesion, with improved quantitative signal from both the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the cingulum. The observed fiber preservation from the cingulum and the anterior limb of the internal capsule, with minor injury to the corpus callosum, was in close agreement with preoperative trajectory modeling. Comparison of pre- and postoperative HDFT data facilitated quantification of the benefits and costs of the surgical trajectory. Future studies will help to determine whether HDFT combined with endoscopic port surgery facilitates anatomical and functional preservation in such challenging cases.