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Rick Abbott

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Rick Abbott

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George I. Jallo, Karl F. Kothbauer and I. Rick Abbott

The traditional treatment for all forms of hydrocephalus has been the implantation of ventricular shunt systems; however, these systems have inherent tendencies toward complications such as malfunction and infection. A significant advance in the treatment of hydrocephalus has been the evolution of endoscopy. The recent technological advances in this field have led to a renewed interest in endoscopic third ventriculostomy as the treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. Although several different endoscopes are available, the authors favor a rigid one to perform a blunt fenestration of the third ventricle floor. This description of the technique stresses the nuances for successful completion of this procedure.

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Jeffrey H. Wisoff, Rick Abbott and Fred Epstein

✓ Sixteen children underwent 18 operations for radical resection of chiasmatic-hypothalamic tumors. The clinical presentation correlated with age: infants under 1 year of age presented with macrocephaly, failure to thrive, and severe visual failure; children aged 1 to 5 years predominantly had precocious puberty with mild visual deficits; and older children (> 5 years old) had slowly progressive loss of vision. All three infants had biologically aggressive tumors in spite of low-grade histology, and died from progressive tumor growth. Eleven of the 13 children aged 1 year or over are alive and well, without clinical or radiographic evidence of disease progression, 4 months to 4½ years following surgery. Six of these patients, with a follow-up period of 10 months to 4½ years (mean 27 months), have had no adjuvant therapy following radical surgical resection. The authors conclude that: 1) radical surgical resection of chiasmatic-hypothalamic tumors can be performed with minimal morbidity; 2) radical resection may delay the time to disease progression in older children and postpone the need for irradiation; 3) resection of postirradiation recurrent tumors may provide neurological improvement and long-lasting clinical remission; and 4) chiasmatic-hypothalamic tumors of infancy are aggressive neoplasms that require multimodality therapy.

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Lauren Weintraub, Todd Miller, Ilana Friedman, Rick Abbott and Adam S. Levy

The screening and detection of recurrent medulloblastoma presents the clinician with significant diagnostic challenges, including the risk of misdiagnosis. The authors present the case of a young girl with a history of a treated standard-risk medulloblastoma that highlights the risk of assuming recurrence has occurred when clinical and/or imaging changes are observed. This girl developed both new clinical deficits and had radiographic evidence of recurrence. She subsequently experienced a complete resolution of symptoms and radiographic findings with steroids alone.

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Mark Lee, Ali R. Rezai, Rick Abbott, Daniel H. Coelho and Fred J. Epstein

✓ Spinal cord lipomas are rare lesions, accounting for approximately 1% of all spinal cord tumors. True intramedullary spinal cord lipomas are extremely rare and are represented in the literature as scattered, single case reports. The authors present a series of six patients with intramedullary spinal cord lipomas managed at our institution from July, 1985 to July, 1993. The patients' ages ranged from 8 to 45 years. Four patients presented with newly diagnosed tumors and two had undergone previous surgery. Patients usually presented with long histories of disability followed by rapid progression of their symptoms. Most patients were in poor neurological condition on presentation. Presenting symptoms included spinal pain, dysesthetic sensory changes, gait difficulties, weakness, and incontinence. Three patients had cervical tumors, two had cervicothoracic tumors, and one patient had a thoracic tumor. Diagnostic studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, were obtained in all patients. No patient exhibited any form of spinal dysraphism or had a dural defect. All patients underwent decompressive, subtotal resections of 40% to 70% of their lesions. Follow-up times ranged from 12 to 96 months. All patients had resolution of their pain, but they generally showed no neurological improvement. As of their most recent follow-up visit, none of the patients was neurologically normal; three can function independently, although with neurological deficits. The other three patients cannot function independently and have severe neurological deficits. The authors conclude that patients with intramedullary spinal cord lipoma who present with significant neurological compromise have a very poor prognosis with regard to neurological function and generally show no improvement with surgical resection.

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Sean M. Lew, Joseph N. Morgan, Estee Psaty, Daniel R. Lefton, Jeffrey C. Allen and Rick Abbott

Object

The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of radiation-induced cavernomas in children treated for medulloblastoma.

Methods

A retrospective chart and film review was performed for all patients treated for medulloblastoma at the Insitute for Neurology and Neurosurgery/Beth Israel Medical Center between August 1996 and the present. The clinical and radiographic histories of pediatric patients (ages 3–21 years at diagnosis) with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of medulloblastoma who received craniospinal radiation therapy were reviewed.

Fifty-nine patients were identified, with a mean age at radiation treatment of 7.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 7.2 years. The dose to the craniospinal axis was 24 Gy (31 patients) or 36 Gy (28 patients). The radiation energy in the craniospinal axis was provided by photons in 55 patients and protons in four. All patients received a posterior fossa boost of 54 Gy (46 patients) or 72 Gy (13 patients). Twenty-six lesions developed in 18 patients (31%) during the observation period. The cumulative incidence of lesion development was 5.6, 14, and 43%, at 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The sites of occurrence were cerebral (20 cases) and cerebellar (six cases). There was no significant correlation between age at diagnosis, sex, craniospinal radiation dose or energy source, and lesion development. Only one patient required surgical intervention for a symptomatic hemorrhagic lesion in the frontal lobe. Histological analysis in this case was consistent with cavernoma.

Conclusions

Cavernomas are common after cranial irradiation in children, and their incidence increases over time. Most of these lesions follow a benign course and do not require intervention.

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George I. Jallo, Karl Kothbauer, Vikas Mehta, Rick Abbott and Fred Epstein

Object

Meningioangiomatosis is an uncommon clinical entity. This lesion has been reported at time of autopsy in patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) and in case reports of patients without NF Type 2 (NF2). The authors report a series of six patients with meningioangiomatosis who do not have NF2 and describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis of disease, and treatment. They also review the literature concerning this entity.

Methods

Six patients with meningioangiomatosis were treated at the authors' institutions from 1994 to 2001. The mean age of the patients was 10.7 years (range 5–14 years). All of the children presented with a seizure disorder. Surgery was performed in all children, and a gross-total resection was accomplished.

All patients exhibited clinical improvement. At last follow up (mean 6.3 years) all patients are free of seizures and are not taking anticonvulsant medications. No signs of recurrence have been noted on imaging studies.

Conclusions

The authors advocate a gross-total resection of meningioangiomatosis for the treatment of seizure disorder in this population.

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Adam L. Sandler, Lawrence B. Daniels III, David A. Staffenberg, Eliezer Kolatch, James T. Goodrich and Rick Abbott

A subset of hydrocephalic patients in whom shunts are placed at an early age will develop craniocerebral disproportion (CCD), an iatrogenic mismatch between the fixed intracranial volume and the growing brain. The lack of a reliable, reproducible method to diagnose this condition, however, has hampered attempts to treat it appropriately. For those practitioners who acknowledge the need to create more intracranial space in these patients, the lack of agreed-upon therapeutic end points for cranial vault expansion has limited the use of such techniques and has sometimes led to problems of underexpansion. Here, the authors present a definition of CCD based primarily on the temporal correlation of plateau waves on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and headache exacerbation. The authors describe a technique of exploiting continued ICP monitoring during progressive cranial expansion in which the goal of distraction is the cessation of plateau waves. Previously encountered problems of underexpansion may be mitigated through the simultaneous use of ICP monitors and gradual cranial expansion over time.