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  • Author or Editor: Ramazan Jabbarli x
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Zhiyuan Yu, Jun Zheng, Lu Ma, Chao You and Hao Li

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Ramazan Jabbarli, Matthias Reinhard, Roland Roelz, Klaus Kaier, Astrid Weyerbrock, Christian Taschner, Christian Scheiwe and Mukesch Shah

OBJECTIVE

An asymmetry of the A1 segments (A1SA) of the anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs) is an assumed risk factor for the development of anterior communicating artery aneurysms (ACoAAs). It is unknown whether A1SA is also clinically relevant after aneurysm rupture. The authors of this study investigated the impact of A1SA on the clinical course and outcome of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed data on consecutive SAH patients treated at their institution between January 2005 and December 2012. The occurrence and severity of cerebral infarctions in the ACA territories were evaluated on follow-up CT scans up to 6 weeks after SAH. Moreover, the risk for an unfavorable outcome (defined as > 3 points on the modified Rankin Scale) at 6 months after SAH was assessed.

RESULTS

A total of 594 patients were included in the final analysis. An A1SA was identified on digital subtraction angiography studies from 127 patients (21.4%) and was strongly associated with ACoAA (p < 0.0001, OR 13.7). An A1SA independently correlated with the occurrence of ACA infarction in patients with ACoAA (p = 0.047) and in those without an ACoAA (p = 0.015). Among patients undergoing ACoAA coiling, A1SA was independently associated with the severity of ACA infarction (p = 0.023) and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.045, OR = 2.4).

CONCLUSIONS

An A1SA is a common anatomical variation in SAH patients and is strongly associated with ACoAA. Moreover, the presence of A1SA independently increases the likelihood of ACA infarction. In SAH patients undergoing ACoAA coiling, A1SA carries the risk for severe ACA infarction and thus an unfavorable outcome.

Clinical trial registration no.: DRKS00005486 (http://www.drks.de/)

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Ramazan Jabbarli, Daniela Pierscianek, Karsten Wrede, Philipp Dammann, Marc Schlamann, Michael Forsting, Oliver Müller and Ulrich Sure

OBJECTIVE

The complete clipping of a cerebral aneurysm usually warrants its sustained occlusion, while clip remnants may have far-reaching consequences. The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors for clip remnants requiring retreatment and/or exhibiting growth.

METHODS

All consecutive patients with primary aneurysm clipping performed at University Hospital of Essen between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, were eligible for this study. Aneurysm occlusion was judged on obligatory postoperative digital subtraction angiography and the need for repeated vascular control. The identified clip remnants were correlated with various demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, aneurysm features, and surgery-related aspects.

RESULTS

Of 616 primarily clipped aneurysms, postoperative angiography revealed 112 aneurysms (18%) with clip remnants requiring further control (n = 91) or direct retreatment (n = 21). Seven remnants exhibited growth during follow-up, whereas 2 cases were associated with aneurysmal bleeding. Therefore, a total of 28 aneurysms (4.5%) were retreated as clip remnants (range 1 day to 67 months after clipping). In the multivariate analysis, the need for retreatment of clip remnant was correlated with the aneurysm's initial size (> 12 mm; OR 3.22; p = 0.035) and location (anterior cerebral artery > internal carotid artery > posterior circulation > middle cerebral artery; OR 1.85; p = 0.003). Younger age with a cutoff at 45 years (OR 33.31; p = 0.004) was the only independent predictor for remnant growth.

CONCLUSIONS

The size and location of the aneurysm are the main risk factors for clip remnants requiring retreatment. Because of the risk for growth, younger individuals (< 45 years old) with clip remnants require a long-term (> 5 years) vascular follow-up.

Clinical trial registration no: DRKS00008749 (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien)

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Mehdi Chihi, Oliver Gembruch, Marvin Darkwah Oppong, Bixia Chen, Thiemo Florin Dinger, Lennart Barthel, Daniela Pierscianek, Karsten H. Wrede, Neriman Özkan, Ulrich Sure and Ramazan Jabbarli

OBJECTIVE

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare multisystem genetic disease. Arterial wall developmental disorders, such as aneurysms, in association with TSC have been well described for extracranial vasculature. The characteristics of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) in TSC have not previously been addressed in the literature. This systematic review was performed to identify and assess the distinct characteristics of IAs in patients with TSC.

METHODS

The authors searched PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science for publications describing cases of TSC and IA reported before August 7, 2018. They also report 2 cases of IAs in TSC patients treated at their own institution.

RESULTS

Thirty-three TSC patients with a total of 42 IAs were included in this review. Three individuals presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The IAs were large or giant in 57.1% and fusiform in 45.2% of the cases. Most of the IAs (61.9%, 26 of 42) originated from the internal carotid artery. There was a higher prevalence of pediatric cases (66.7%) and male patients (63.6%, 21 of 32 individuals with known sex) among the collected series.

CONCLUSIONS

TSC patients with IAs are characterized with a higher proportion of large/giant and fusiform IAs and young age, suggesting rapid aneurysmal growth. Furthermore, there is a distinct location pattern of IAs and an inverse sex ratio than in the healthy population. Large population-based patient registers are required to improve the understanding of epidemiology and pathophysiology of IA formation in TSC.

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Marvin Darkwah Oppong, Kathrin Buffen, Daniela Pierscianek, Annika Herten, Yahya Ahmadipour, Philipp Dammann, Laurèl Rauschenbach, Michael Forsting, Ulrich Sure and Ramazan Jabbarli

OBJECTIVE

Clinical data on secondary hemorrhagic complications (SHCs) in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are sparse and mostly limited to ventriculostomy-associated SHCs. This study aimed to elucidate the incidence, risk factors, and impact on outcome of SHCs in a large cohort of SAH patients.

METHODS

All consecutive patients with ruptured aneurysms treated between January 2003 and June 2016 were eligible for this study. Patients’ charts were reviewed for clinical data, and imaging studies were reviewed for radiographic data. SHCs were divided into those associated with ventriculostomy and those not associated with ventriculostomy, as well as into major and minor bleeding forms, depending on clinical impact.

RESULTS

Sixty-two (6.6%) of the 939 patients included in the final analysis developed SHCs. Ventriculostomy-associated bleedings (n = 16) were independently predicted by mono- or dual-antiplatelet therapy after aneurysm treatment (p = 0.028, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 10.28; and p = 0.026, aOR = 14.25, respectively) but showed no impact on functional outcome after SAH. Periinterventional use of thrombolytic agents for early effective anticoagulation was the only independent predictor (p = 0.010, aOR = 4.27) of major SHCs (n = 38, 61.3%) in endovascularly treated patients. In turn, a major SHC was independently associated with poor outcome at the 6-month follow-up (modified Rankin Scale score > 3). Blood thinning drug therapy prior to SAH was not associated with SHC risk.

CONCLUSIONS

SHCs present a rare sequela of SAH. Antiplatelet therapy during (but not before) SAH increases the risk of ventriculostomy-associated bleedings, but without further impact on the course and outcome of SAH. The use of thrombolytic agents for early effective anticoagulation carries relevant risk for major SHCs and poor outcome.

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Marvin Darkwah Oppong, Meltem Gümüs, Daniela Pierscianek, Annika Herten, Andreas Kneist, Karsten Wrede, Lennart Barthel, Michael Forsting, Ulrich Sure and Ramazan Jabbarli

OBJECTIVE

Current guidelines for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) include early aneurysm treatment within 72 hours after ictus. However, aneurysm rebleeding remains a crucial complication of SAH. The aim of this study was to identify independent predictors allowing early stratification of SAH patients for rebleeding risk.

METHODS

All patients admitted to the authors’ institution with ruptured aneurysms during a 14-year period were eligible for this retrospective study. Demographic and radiographic parameters, aneurysm characteristics, medical history, and medications as well as baseline parameters at admission (blood pressure and laboratory parameters) were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. A novel risk score was created using independent risk factors.

RESULTS

Data from 984 cases could be included into the final analysis. Aneurysm rebleeding occurred in 58 cases (5.9%), and in 48 of these cases (82.8%) rerupture occurred within 24 hours after SAH. Of over 30 tested associations, preexisting arterial hypertension (p = 0.02; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.56, 1 score point), aneurysm location at the basilar artery (p = 0.001, aOR 4.5, 2 score points), sac size ≥ 9 mm (p = 0.04, aOR 1.9, 1 score point), presence of intracerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.001, aOR 4.29, 2 score points), and acute hydrocephalus (p < 0.001, aOR 6.27, 3 score points) independently predicted aneurysm rebleeding. A score built upon these parameters (0–9 points) showed a good diagnostic accuracy (p < 0.001, area under the curve 0.780) for rebleeding prediction.

CONCLUSIONS

Certain patient-, aneurysm-, and SAH-specific parameters can reliably predict aneurysm rerupture. A score developed according to these parameters might help to identify individuals that would profit from immediate aneurysm occlusion.

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Philipp Dammann, Karsten Wrede, Ramazan Jabbarli, Salome Neuschulte, Katja Menzler, Yuan Zhu, Neriman Özkan, Oliver Müller, Michael Forsting, Felix Rosenow and Ulrich Sure

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine seizure outcome, functional outcome, and the withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) after conservative or surgical treatment of patients with new-onset cavernoma-related epilepsy (CRE).

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective comparative observational study of 79 consecutive patients, each with a single sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and new-onset CRE.

RESULTS

Forty-one patients underwent initial surgery (IS), and 38 patients underwent initial conservative (IC) treatment. Of those in the latter group, 19 underwent delayed surgical (DS) treatment. At the last follow-up, 88%, 32%, and 79% of patients in the respective groups had been seizure free for at least 2 years (International League Against Epilepsy [ILAE] Class 1; IS vs IC, p < 0.0001) and 78%, 8%, and 58%, respectively, had been off AEDs (IS vs IC, p < 0.0001). The cumulative probability of staying seizure free (ILAE Class 1) during a 5-year period was 73% (mean seizure-free follow-up 49.8 ± 2.7 months, 95% CI 44.4–55.1 months) for the IS group, 22% (mean 31.8 ± 3.6 months, 95% CI 24.8–38.8 months) for the IC group, and 68% (mean 48.6 ± 4.3 months, 95% CI 40.1–57.1 months) for the DS group (IS vs IC p < 0.001). Long-term operative morbidity was 3%, and long-term morbidity in the conservatively treated group was also 3%.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with CCM and new-onset CRE who underwent IS treatment showed better results in seizure control and the discontinuation of AEDs than the conservatively treated patients. Operative morbidity was comparable to the morbidity from symptomatic CCM hemorrhage in the conservative group. Half of the patients who started with conservative treatment underwent subsequent surgical treatment; however, a longer duration of epilepsy prior to surgery did not worsen postoperative seizure outcome.

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Homajoun Maslehaty, Crescenzo Capone, Roman Frantsev, Igor Fischer, Ramazan Jabbarli, Jan F. Cornelius, Marcel A. Kamp, Paolo Cappabianca, Ulrich Sure, Hans-Jakob Steiger and Athanasios K. Petridis

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to define predictive factors for rupture of middle cerebral artery (MCA) mirror bifurcation aneurysms.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed the data in patients with ruptured MCA bifurcation aneurysms with simultaneous presence of an unruptured MCA bifurcation mirror aneurysm treated in two neurosurgical centers. The following parameters were measured and analyzed with the statistical software R: neck, dome, and width of both MCA aneurysms—including neck/dome and width/neck ratios, shape of the aneurysms (regular vs irregular), inflow angle of both MCA aneurysms, and the diameters of the bilateral A1 and M1 segments and the frontal and temporal M2 trunks, as well as the bilateral diameter of the internal carotid artery (ICA).

RESULTS

The authors analyzed the data of 44 patients (15 male and 29 female, mean age 50.1 years). Starting from the usual significance level of 0.05, the Sidak-corrected significance level is 0.0039. The diameter of the measured vessels was statistically not significant, nor was the inflow angle. The size of the dome was highly significant (p = 0.0000069). The size of the neck (p = 0.0047940) and the width of the aneurysms (p = 0.0056902) were slightly nonsignificant at the stated significance level of 0.0039. The shape of the aneurysms was bilaterally identical in 22 cases (50%). In cases of asymmetrical presentation of the aneurysm shape, 19 (86.4%) ruptured aneurysms were irregular and 3 (13.6%) had a regular shape (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

In this study the authors show that the extraaneurysmal flow dynamics in mirror aneurysms are nonsignificant, and the aneurysmal geometry also does not seem to play a role as a predictor for rupture. The only predictors for rupture were size and shape of the aneurysms. It seems as though under the same conditions, one of the two aneurysms suffers changes in its wall and starts growing in a more or less stochastic manner. Newer imaging methods should enable practitioners to see which aneurysm has an unstable wall, to predict the rupture risk. At the moment one can only conclude that in cases of MCA mirror aneurysms the larger one, with or without shape irregularities, is the unstable aneurysm and that this is the one that needs to be treated.