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Rajiv R. Iyer, Xiaobu Ye, Qiuyu Jin, Yao Lu, Luckmini Liyanage and Edward S. Ahn

OBJECTIVE

Many infants with sagittal craniosynostosis undergo effective surgical correction with endoscopic strip craniectomy (ESC) and postoperative helmet therapy (PHT). While PHT is essential to achieving optimal cosmesis following ESC, there has been little comprehensive analysis of the ideal PHT duration needed to attain this goal.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of infants undergoing ESC and PHT for sagittal synostosis at our institution between 2008 and 2015. Data collected included age at surgery, follow-up duration, and PHT duration. Cephalic index (CI) was evaluated preoperatively (CIpre), at its peak level (CImax), at termination of helmet therapy (CIoff), and at last follow-up (CIfinal). A multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine factors influencing CIfinal.

RESULTS

Thirty-one patients (27 male, 4 female) were treated in the studied time period. The median age at surgery was 2.7 months (range 1.6 to 3.2) and the median duration of PHT was 10.4 months (range 8.4 to 14.4). The mean CImax was 0.83 (SD 0.01), which was attained an average of 8.4 months (SD 1.2) following PHT initiation. At last follow-up, there was an average retraction of CIfinal among all patients to 0.78 (SD 0.01). Longer helmet duration after achieving CImax did not correlate with higher CIfinal values. While CImax was a significant predictor of CIfinal, neither age at surgery nor CIpre were found to be predictive of final outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients undergoing ESC and PHT for sagittal synostosis reach a peak CI around 7 to 9 months after surgery. PHT beyond CImax does not improve final anthropometric outcomes. CIfinal is significantly dependent on CImax, but not on age, nor CIpre. These results imply that helmet removal at CImax may be appropriate for ESC patients, while helmeting beyond the peak does not change final outcome.

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Rajiv R. Iyer, John A. Butman, Stuart Walbridge, Neville D. Gai, John D. Heiss and Russell R. Lonser

Object

Because convection-enhanced delivery relies on bulk flow of fluid in the interstitial spaces, MR imaging techniques that detect extracellular fluid and fluid movement may be useful for tracking convective drug distribution. To determine the tracking accuracy of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR imaging sequences, the authors followed convective distribution of radiolabeled compounds using these imaging sequences in nonhuman primates.

Methods

Three nonhuman primates underwent thalamic convective infusions (5 infusions) with 14C-sucrose (MW 342 D) or 14C-dextran (MW 70,000 D) during serial MR imaging (T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging). Imaging, histological, and autoradiographic findings were analyzed.

Results

Real-time T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging clearly demonstrated the region of infusion, and serial images revealed progressive filling of the bilateral thalami during infusion. Imaging analysis for T2- and diffusion-weighted sequences revealed that the tissue volume of distribution (Vd) increased linearly with volume of infusion (Vi; R2 = 0.94, R2 = 0.91). Magnetic resonance imaging analysis demonstrated that the mean ± SD Vd/Vi ratios for T2-weighted (3.6 ± 0.5) and diffusion-weighted (3.3 ± 0.4) imaging were similar (p = 0.5). While 14C-sucrose and 14C-dextran were homogeneously distributed over the infused region, autoradiographic analysis revealed that T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging significantly underestimated the Vd of both 14C-sucrose (mean differences 51.3% and 52.3%, respectively; p = 0.02) and 14C-dextran (mean differences 49.3% and 59.6%; respectively, p = 0.001).

Conclusions

Real-time T2- and diffusion-weighted MR imaging significantly underestimate tissue Vd during convection-enhanced delivery over a wide range of molecular sizes. Application of these imaging modalities may lead to inaccurate estimation of convective drug distribution.

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Rajiv R. Iyer, Carolyn M. Carey, S. Alex Rottgers, Lisa Tetreault, Nir Shimony, Jennifer Katzenstein, Ernesto Ruas and Gerald F. Tuite

OBJECTIVE

Infants with severe hydrocephalus and extreme macrocephaly typically undergo CSF diversion early in life, which can result in significant cranial deformity due to CSF overdrainage. In this scenario, overlap of the cranial plates can precede the development of secondary synostosis and/or severe, permanent cranial deformity. As a result, extensive cranial vault remodeling is sometimes undertaken later in life, which is often challenging and has been associated with mortality and a high morbidity rate. The authors have previously described a technique for early postnatal cranial vault reduction and fixation (CVRF), in which the calvarial bones are stabilized using absorbable fixation plates in the neonatal period, in an attempt to facilitate patient positioning, simplify hydrocephalus management, and improve cosmesis. Here, the authors describe their institutional experience managing patients with extreme neonatal hydrocephalus with CSF diversion, with and without CVRF, over the past 12 years.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of infants with extreme hydrocephalus (head circumference > 49 cm) treated at their children’s hospital with ventriculoperitoneal shunting, with or without CVRF, between 2005 and 2017. Data collected included age, sex, etiology of hydrocephalus, type of CVRF performed (anterior, posterior, or combined), follow-up duration, orbitofrontal circumference, craniometric measurements, intraoperative blood loss, operative duration, and postoperative complications. Developmental data were collected using the third edition of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire. Photographic imaging was used to demonstrate esthetic outcomes, and family questionnaires were used to evaluate satisfaction with the esthetic outcome.

RESULTS

Eleven patients with extreme neonatal hydrocephalus underwent CSF shunting; 5 underwent shunting alone and 6 patients underwent shunting and CVRF. For patients who underwent shunting and CVRF, the median age at CVRF was 6 days and the median interval between shunt placement and CVRF was 2.5 days. The mean extent of calvarial vault volume reduction was 44.5% (± 3.9%). The mean duration of the CVRF procedure was 108 minutes, and 5 of 6 patients required intraoperative transfusion. Of the 5 patients who underwent shunting alone, 3 developed severe cranial deformities. Of 6 patients who underwent shunting and CVRF, 1 had a poor cosmetic outcome. In the shunting-alone group, 2 patients died and 1 required extensive cranial vault correction at 10 years of age. One patient in the shunting and CVRF group also died.

CONCLUSIONS

CVRF in combination with CSF shunting in the neonatal period can simplify the treatment of the rare case of severe hydrocephalic macrocephaly and leads to cosmetic outcomes that are considered good by their families.

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David S. Hersh, Rajiv R. Iyer, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Ann Liu, George I. Jallo and Mari L. Groves

OBJECTIVE

Spinal deformity has become a well-recognized complication of intramedullary spinal cord tumor (IMSCT) resection. In particular, laminectomy can result in biomechanical instability caused by loss of the posterior tension band. Therefore, laminoplasty has been proposed as an alternative to laminectomy. Here, the authors describe the largest current series of pediatric patients who have undergone laminoplasty for IMSCT resection and investigate the need for surgical fusion after both laminectomy and laminoplasty.

METHODS

The medical records of pediatric patients who underwent resection of an IMSCT at a single institution between November 2003 and May 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, histopathological, and follow-up data were collected.

RESULTS

Sixty-six consecutive patients underwent resection of an IMSCT during the study period. Forty-three (65%) patients were male. The patients had a median age of 12.9 years (interquartile range [IQR] 7.2–16.5 years) at the time of surgery. Patients typically presented with a tumor that involved the cervical and/or thoracic spine. Nineteen (29%) patients underwent laminectomy, and 47 (71%) patients underwent laminoplasty. Patients in each cohort had a similar rate of postoperative deformity. Overall, 10 (15%) patients required instrumented spinal fusion for spinal deformity. Four patients required revision of the primary fusion.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings show that among pediatric patients with an IMSCT, postoperative surgical fusion rates remain high, even after laminoplasty. Known risk factors, such as the age of the patient, location of the tumor, and the number of involved levels, might play a larger role than replacement of the laminae in determining the rate of surgical fusion after IMSCT resection.

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Zhengping Zhuang, Meng Qi, Jie Li, Hiroaki Okamoto, David S. Xu, Rajiv R. Iyer, Jie Lu, Chunzhang Yang, Robert J. Weil, Alexander Vortmeyer and Russell R. Lonser

Object

Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are primary CNS tumors that remain a challenge to differentiate histologically because of their morphological variability and because there is a lack of reliable differential diagnostic markers. To identify proteins that are differentially expressed between astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, the authors analyzed the proteomic expression patterns and identified uniquely expressed proteins in these neoplasms.

Methods

Proteomes of astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas were analyzed using 2D gel electrophoresis and subsequent computerized gel analysis to detect differentially expressed proteins. The proteins were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography accompanied by tandem mass spectrometry. To determine the role of the differentially expressed proteins in astrocytes, undifferentiated glial cell cultures were treated with dibutyryl–cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).

Results

Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that glutamine synthetase was differentially expressed in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the increased expression of glutamine synthetase in astrocytomas compared with oligodendrogliomas. Whereas glutamine synthetase expression was demonstrated across all grades of astrocytomas (Grade II–IV [15 tumors]) and oligoastrocytomas (4 tumors), it was expressed in only 1 oligodendroglioma (6% [16 tumors]). Treatment of undifferentiated glial cell cultures with dibutyryl-cAMP resulted in astrocyte differentiation that was associated with increased levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase.

Conclusions

These data indicate that glutamine synthetase expression can be used to distinguish astrocytic from oligodendroglial tumors and may play a role in the pathogenesis of astrocytomas.

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Rajiv R. Iyer, Noah Gorelick, Karen Carroll, Ari M. Blitz, Sarah Beck, Caroline M. Garrett, Audrey Monroe, Betty Tyler, Sean T. Zuckerman, Jeffrey R. Capadona, Horst A. von Recum and Mark G. Luciano

OBJECTIVE

Ventricular shunt infection remains an issue leading to high patient morbidity and cost, warranting further investigation. The authors sought to create an animal model of shunt infection that could be used to evaluate possible catheter modifications and innovations.

METHODS

Three dogs underwent bilateral ventricular catheter implantation and inoculation with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In 2 experimental animals, the catheters were modified with a polymer containing chemical “pockets” loaded with vancomycin. In 1 control animal, the catheters were polymer coated but without antibiotics. Animals were monitored for 9 to 11 days, after which the shunts were explanted. MRI was performed after shunt implantation and prior to catheter harvest. The catheters were sonicated prior to microbiological culture and also evaluated by electron microscopy. The animals’ brains were evaluated for histopathology.

RESULTS

All animals underwent successful catheter implantation. The animals developed superficial wound infections, but no neurological deficits. Imaging demonstrated ventriculitis and cerebral edema. Harvested catheters from the control animal demonstrated > 104 colony-forming units (CFUs) of S. aureus. In the first experimental animal, one shunt demonstrated > 104 CFUs of S. aureus, but the other demonstrated no growth. In the second experimental animal, one catheter demonstrated no growth, and the other grew trace S. aureus. Brain histopathology revealed acute inflammation and ventriculitis in all animals, which was more severe in the control.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors evaluated an animal model of ventricular shunting and reliably induced features of shunt infection that could be microbiologically quantified. With this model, investigation of pathophysiological and imaging correlates of infection and potentially beneficial shunt catheter modifications is possible.

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Ben Shofty, Liat Ben-Sira, Anat Kesler, George Jallo, Mari L. Groves, Rajiv R. Iyer, Alvaro Lassaletta, Uri Tabori, Eric Bouffet, Ulrich-Wilhelm Thomale, Pablo Hernáiz Driever, Shlomi Constantini and for the Isolated Optic Nerve Abnormalities (IONA) Collaboration

OBJECTIVE

Isolated optic nerve gliomas (IONGs) constitute a rare subgroup of optic pathway gliomas (OPGs). Due to the rarity of this condition and the difficulty in differentiating IONGs from other types of OPGs in most clinical series, little is known about these tumors. Currently, due to lack of evidence, they are managed the same as any other OPG.

METHODS

The authors conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study aimed at determining the natural history of IONGs. Included were patients with clear-cut glioma of the optic nerve without posterior (chiasmatic/hypothalamic) involvement. At least 1 year of follow-up, 2 MRI studies, and 2 neuro-ophthalmological examinations were required for inclusion.

RESULTS

Thirty-six patients with 39 tumors were included in this study. Age at diagnosis ranged between 6 months and 16 years (average 6 years). The mean follow-up time was 5.6 years. Twenty-five patients had neurofibromatosis Type 1. During the follow-up period, 59% of the tumors progressed, 23% remained stable, and 18% (all with neurofibromatosis Type 1) displayed some degree of spontaneous regression. Fifty-one percent of the patients presented with visual decline, of whom 90% experienced further deterioration. Nine patients were treated with chemotherapy, 5 of whom improved visually. Ten patients underwent operation, and no local or distal recurrence was noted.

CONCLUSIONS

Isolated optic nerve gliomas are highly dynamic tumors. Radiological progression and visual deterioration occur in greater percentages than in the general population of patients with OPGs. Response to chemotherapy may be better in this group, and its use should be considered early in the course of the disease.