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Wei Pan, Jia-li Zhao, Jin Xu, Ming Zhang, Tao Fang, Jing Yan, Xin-hong Wang, and Quan Zhou

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to compare the preoperative radiographic features of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) with and without local coronal imbalance (LCI) and to investigate the surgical outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in the treatment of DLS with LCI at the spondylolisthesis level. DLS with scoliotic disc wedging and/or lateral listhesis at the same involved segment, as well as LCI, constitutes a distinct subgroup. However, previous studies concerning surgical outcomes focused mainly on sagittal profiles. There is a paucity of valid data regarding lumbar coronal alignment and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after surgery in DLS with LCI.

METHODS

The authors reviewed consecutive patients who received TLIF for L4/5 DLS between 2009 and 2018. Patients were assigned to the LCI and non-LCI groups based on preoperative radiographs. Demographics, radiographic parameters related to both sagittal and coronal alignment, and PROs were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

There were 21 patients in the LCI and 80 in the non-LCI group. Compared with the non-LCI group, the LCI group was characterized by lower preoperative lumbar lordosis on sagittal alignment (38.3° vs 43.7°, p < 0.05), higher lumbar Cobb angle on coronal alignment (12.4° vs 5.1°, p < 0.05), and worse lumbar coronal balance (18.5 mm vs 6.8 mm, p < 0.05). After surgery, lumbar alignment in the sagittal and coronal planes was significantly improved in the LCI group, whereas no significant changes occurred in the non-LCI group. Scores on the preoperative Oswestry Disability Index and the visual analog scale for back pain and leg pain scores were significantly higher in the LCI group, whereas no differences were found between the 2 groups in the postoperative evaluation (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

DLS with LCI constitutes a distinct subgroup characterized by coronal malalignment and loss of whole lumbar lordosis, which may result in worse PROs. The TLIF procedure allows the reconstruction of the coronal and sagittal lumbar profile and achievement of satisfactory PROs.

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Feng Shen, Bin Zhou, Quan Li, Ming Li, Zhiwei Wang, Qiang Li, and Bo Ran

OBJECT

The object of this study was to review the effectiveness in treating severe and rigid scoliosis with posterioronly spinal release combined with derotation, translation, segmental correction, and an in situ rod-contouring technique.

METHODS

Twenty-eight patients with severe and rigid scoliosis (Cobb angle > 70° and flexibility < 30%) were retrospectively enrolled between June 2008 and June 2010. The average age of the patients was 17.1 years old (range 12–22 years old), 18 were female, and 10 were male. Etiological diagnoses were idiopathic in 24 patients, neuromuscular in 2 patients, and Marfan syndrome in 2 patients. All patients underwent posterior spinal release, derotation, translation, segmental correction, and an in situ rod-contouring technique. The scoliosis Cobb angle in the coronal plane, kyphosis Cobb angle, apex vertebral translation, and trunk shift were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively.

RESULTS

The average operative time was 241.8 ± 32.1 minutes and estimated blood loss was 780.5 ± 132.6 ml. The average scoliosis Cobb angle in the coronal plane was corrected from 85.7° (range 77°–94°) preoperatively to 33.1° (range 21°–52°) postoperatively, with a correction ratio of 61.3%. The average kyphosis Cobb angle was 64.5° (range 59°–83°) preoperatively, which was decreased to 42.6° (range 34°–58°) postoperatively, with a correction ratio of 33.9%. After an average of 24 months of follow-up (range 13–30 months), no major complications were observed in these patients, except screw pullout of the upper thoracic vertebrae in 2 patients and screw penetration into the apical vertebrae in 1 patient.

CONCLUSIONS

Posterior spinal release combined with derotation, translation, segmental correction, and an in situ rod-contouring technique has proved to be a promising new technique for rigid scoliosis, significantly correcting the scoliosis and accompanied by fewer complications.

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Feng Zhou, Zixiao Yang, Wei Zhu, Liang Chen, Jianping Song, Kai Quan, Sichen Li, Peiliang Li, Zhiguang Pan, Peixi Liu, and Ying Mao

OBJECTIVE

Epidermoid cysts of the cavernous sinus (CS) are rare, and no large case series of these lesions has been reported. In this study, the authors retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of the surgical management of CS epidermoid cysts undertaken at their center and performed a review of any such cysts reported in the literature over the past 40 years.

METHODS

Clinical data were obtained on 31 patients with CS epidermoid cysts that had been surgically treated at the authors’ hospital between 2001 and 2016. The patients’ medical records, imaging data, and follow-up outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. The related literature from the past 40 years (18 articles, 20 patients) was also evaluated.

RESULTS

The most common chief complaints were facial numbness or hypesthesia (64.5%), absent corneal reflex (45.2%), and abducens or oculomotor nerve deficit (35.5%). On MRI, 51.6% of the epidermoid cysts showed low T1 signals and equal or high T2 signals. In the other lesions, the radiological findings varied considerably given differences in the composition of the cysts. Surgery was performed via the extradural approach (58.1%), intradural approach (32.3%), or a combined approach (9.7%). After the operation, symptoms remained similar or improved in 90.3% of patients and new oculomotor paralysis developed after the operation in 9.7% of patients. Seven patients (22.6%) developed meningitis postoperatively (5 aseptic and 2 septic), and all of them recovered. All patients achieved good recovery before discharge (Karnofsky Performance Status score ≥ 70). Over an average follow-up of 4.6 ± 3.0 years in 25 patients (80.6%), no recurrence or reoperation occurred, regardless of whether total or subtotal resection of the capsule had been achieved.

CONCLUSIONS

Both the extradural and intradural approaches can enable satisfactory lesion resection. A favorable prognosis and symptomatic improvement can be expected after both total and subtotal capsule resections. Total capsule resection is encouraged to minimize the possibility of recurrence provided that the resection can be safely performed.