Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Qiao Li x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Xin-Yi Gao, Qiao Li, Jing-Run Li, Qian Zhou, Jian-Xun Qu and Zhen-Wei Yao

OBJECTIVE

The authors conducted a study to noninvasively and nonradioactively reveal moyamoya disease (MMD) intracerebral perfusion and perfusion territory supplied by the unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA) and bilateral vertebral arteries (VAs) before surgery and to further identify risk factors for preoperative hemorrhage in adult MMD.

METHODS

Forty-three consecutive adult patients with bilateral MMD underwent unenhanced T1-weighted MRI, territorial arterial spin labeling (t-ASL), and unenhanced 3D time-of-flight MRA (3D-TOF-MRA). Clinical factors, including age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, current smoking status, and history of taking aspirin, were gathered and stratified. Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between various risk factors and the occurrence of preoperative hemorrhage. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine independent risk factors of preoperative hemorrhage in MMD.

RESULTS

Among the 86 MMD hemispheres, t-ASL revealed 137 perfusion territory shifts in 79 hemispheres. Five distinct categories of perfusion territory shifts were observed on t-ASL maps. The subtypes of perfusion territory shift on t-ASL maps were further subdivided into 2 different categories, group A and group B, in combination with findings on 3D-TOF-MRA. A perfusion territory shift attributable solely to the secondary collaterals was a potential independent risk factor for preoperative hemorrhage (p = 0.026; 95% CI 1.201–18.615; OR 4.729). After eliminating the influence of the secondary collaterals, the primary collaterals had no significant effect on the risk of preoperative hemorrhage (p = 0.182).

CONCLUSIONS

t-ASL could reveal comprehensive MMD cerebral blood perfusion and the vivid perfusion territory shifts fed by the unilateral ICA and ECA and bilateral VAs in a noninvasive, straightforward, nonradioactive, and nonenhanced manner. 3D-TOF-MRA could subdivide t-ASL perfusion territory shifts according to their shunt arteries. A perfusion territory shift attributable to the secondary collaterals is a potential independent risk factor for preoperative hemorrhage in MMD patients. A perfusion territory shift fed by the primary collaterals may not have a strong effect on preoperative hemorrhage in MMD patients. These findings make the combined modalities of t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA a feasible tool for MMD disease assessment, management, and surgical strategy planning.

Full access

Xin-Yu Lu, Hui Sun, Jian-Guo Xu and Qiao-Yu Li

Object

Over the last two decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has arisen as a promising approach in the management of brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs). In the present study, the authors report a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data regarding the radiosurgical management of brainstem CMs.

Methods

To identify eligible studies, systematic searches for brainstem CMs treated with SRS were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The search yielded 5 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. Data from 178 patients with brainstem CMs were extracted. Hemorrhage rates before and after SRS were calculated, a meta-analysis was performed, and the risk ratio (RR) was determined.

Results

Four studies showed a statically significant reduction in the annual hemorrhage rate after SRS. The overall RR was 0.161 (95% CI 0.052–0.493; p = 0.001), and 21 patients (11.8%) had transient or permanent neurological deficits.

Conclusions

The present meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of brainstem CMs shows that SRS can decrease the rate of repeat hemorrhage and has a low rate of adverse effects compared with surgery. The authors suggest that SRS may be considered as an alternative treatment for brainstem CMs that are inoperable or have a high operative risk.

Restricted access

Hua-Qiao Tan, Ming-Hua Li, Pei-Lei Zhang, Yong-Dong Li, Jian-Bo Wang, Yue-Qi Zhu and Wu Wang

Object

Placement of covered stents has emerged as a promising therapeutic option for cerebrovascular diseases. However, the medium- and long-term efficacy and safety of covered stents in the treatment of these diseases remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the medium-term clinical and angiographic outcomes of covered stent placement for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

Methods

The authors' institutional review board approved the study. Thirty-four patients (13 females and 21 males; mean age 41.9 years) with 38 intracranial aneurysms were treated with the Willis covered stent. Clinical and angiographic follow-up were performed at 3 months, at 6–12 months, and annually thereafter. The initial procedural and follow-up outcomes were collected and analyzed retrospectively.

Results

Forty-two covered stents were successfully implanted into the target artery in 33 patients with 37 aneurysms, and 1 covered stent navigation failed in 1 patient. A complete aneurysm exclusion was initially achieved in 24 patients with 28 aneurysms, and a minor endoleak occurred in 9 patients with 9 aneurysms. Postoperatively, 2 patients died of complications related to the procedure. Angiographic and clinical follow-up data are available in 30 patients. The angiographic follow-up (17.5 ± 9.4 months [mean ± SD]) exhibited complete occlusion in 28 patients with 31 aneurysms, and incomplete occlusion in 2 aneurysms, with an asymptomatic in-stent stenosis in 3 patients (10%). The clinical follow-up (26.7 ± 13 months [mean ± SD]) demonstrated that 16 patients (53.3%) experienced a full recovery, and 14 patients (46.7%) improved. No aneurysm rupture, thromboembolic events, or neurological deficits resulting from closure of a perforating vessel by covered stent placement occurred.

Conclusions

Endovascular reconstruction with the Willis covered stent represents a safe, durable, and curative treatment option for selected intracranial aneurysms, yielding an excellent medium-term patency of the parent artery and excellent clinical outcomes.

Restricted access

Hua-Qiao Tan, Ming-Hua Li, Yue-Qi Zhu, Chun Fang, Chun-Geng Wu, Ying-Sheng Cheng, Jue Wang, Jian Xie and He Zhang

Object

The development and preclinical assessment of new endovascular devices necessitate readily available and reproducible animal models. The purpose of this study was to develop an in vivo carotid siphon model for testing the properties of covered stents specially designed for the intracranial vasculature.

Methods

Six carotid siphon–shaped devices were created. Six dogs underwent surgery to expose and isolate both common carotid arteries (CCAs). The right CCA origin was ligated and incised distal to the ligation point after temporary constriction of the distal right CCA. The distal left CCA was ligated and incised proximal to the ligation point after the left CCA origin was temporarily clamped. The proximal isolated left CCA was passed through the shaped device and then anastomosed end-to-end to the distal isolated right CCA. Finally, the shaped device was fixed and embedded in the neck. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography was performed at 7 days, 2 weeks, and 1 month postprocedure. All models underwent endovascular interventional simulation. The carotid siphon models were evaluated.

Results

The animals tolerated the surgical procedure well. The mean time for surgical construction of the model was 90 minutes. The morphology and endovascular manipulation of the siphon models were similar to those in humans. Stenosis of anastomotic stoma occurred in 2 models, and mural thrombosis of anastomotic stoma occurred in 1 model; however, all models were patent at postprocedural follow-up angiography.

Conclusions

Surgical construction of an in vivo carotid siphon model in dogs with carotid siphon–shaped devices is feasible and potentially useful for testing neurovascular devices.

Restricted access

Qiao Zuo, Pengfei Yang, Nan Lv, Qinghai Huang, Yu Zhou, Xiaoxi Zhang, Guoli Duan, Yina Wu, Yi Xu, Bo Hong, Rui Zhao, Qiang Li, Yibin Fang, Kaijun Zhao, Dongwei Dai and Jianmin Liu

OBJECTIVE

The authors compared the contemporary perioperative procedure-related complications between coiling with stent placement and coiling without stent placement for acutely ruptured aneurysms treated in a single center after improvement of interventional skills and strategy.

METHODS

In an institutional review board–approved protocol, 133 patients who underwent coiling with stent placement and 289 patients who underwent coiling without stent placement from January 2012 to December 2014 were consecutively reviewed retrospectively. Baseline characteristics, procedure-related complications and mortality rate, angiographic follow-up results, and clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups. Univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the association of procedure-related complications of coiling with stent placement with potential risk factors.

RESULTS

The coiling/stent group and coiling/no-stent group were statistically comparable with respect to all baseline characteristics except for aneurysm location (p < 0.001) and parent artery configuration (p = 0.024). The immediate embolization results and clinical outcomes between the two groups showed no significant differences (p = 0.807 and p = 0.611, respectively). The angiographic follow-up results of the coiling in stent group showed a significant higher occlusion rate and lower recurrence rate compared with the coiling/no-stent group (82.5% vs 66.7%, 3.5% vs 14.5%, p = 0.007). Procedure-related intraoperative rupture and thrombosis, postoperative early rebleeding and thrombosis, and external ventricular drainage–related hemorrhagic event occurred in 3.0% (4 of 133), 2.3% (3 of 133), 1.5% (2 of 133), 0.7% (1 of 133), and 0.8% (1 of 133) of the coiling/stent group compared with 1.0% (3 of 289), 1.4% (4 of 289), 1.4% (4 of 289), and 0.7% (2 of 289) of the coiling/no-stent group, respectively (p = 0.288, p = 0.810, p = 1.000, p = 0.315, and p = 1.000, respectively). One patient presented with coil protrusion in the group of coiling without stent. The procedure-related mortality was 1.5% (2 of 133) in the coiling/stent group and 0.7% in the coiling/no-stent group (p = 0.796). Multivariable analysis showed no significant predictors for the total perioperative procedure-related complications, hemorrhagic complications, or ischemic complications.

CONCLUSIONS

The perioperative procedure-related complications and mortality rate did not differ significantly between the coiling/stent group and the coiling/no-stent group for patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms. Considering the better angiographic follow-up results, coiling with stent placement might be a feasible, safe, and promising option for treatment in the acute phase of selected wide-necked ruptured intracranial aneurysms.