Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for

  • Author or Editor: Philip M. Meyers x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Jason A. Ellis, Hannah Goldstein, E. Sander Connolly Jr. and Philip M. Meyers

Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are vascular shunts allowing blood to flow from the carotid artery into the cavernous sinus. The characteristic clinical features seen in patients with CCFs are the sequelae of hemodynamic dysfunction within the cavernous sinus. Once routinely treated with open surgical procedures, including carotid ligation or trapping and cavernous sinus exploration, endovascular therapy is now the treatment modality of choice in many cases. The authors provide a review of CCFs, detailing the current classification and clinical management of these lesions. Therapeutic options including conservative management, open surgery, endovascular intervention, and radiosurgical therapy are presented. The complications and treatment results as reported in the contemporary literature are also reviewed.

Full access

Jason A. Ellis, Juan C. Mejia Munne, Neil A. Feldstein and Philip M. Meyers

Sinus pericranii is an uncommon congenital cranial venous malformation that may become symptomatic in the pediatric population. Both dominant and accessory sinus pericranii, as determined by the intracranial venous drainage pattern, have been described. The dominant variety drain a significant proportion of the intracranial venous outflow while the accessory variety have minimal or no role in this. Classic teachings hold that dominant sinus pericranii should never be treated while accessory sinus pericranii may be safely obliterated. This determination of dominance is solely based on a qualitative assessment of standard venous phase catheter cerebral angiography, leaving some doubt regarding the actual safety of obliteration. In this paper the authors describe a simple and unique method for determining whether intracranial venous outflow may be compromised by sinus pericranii treatment. This involves performing catheter angiography while the lesion is temporarily obliterated by external compression. Analysis of intracranial venous outflow in this setting allows visualization of angiographic changes that will occur once the sinus pericranii is permanently obliterated. Thus, the safety of surgical intervention can be more fully appraised using this technique.

Full access

Andrew F. Ducruet, Christopher P. Kellner, E. Sander Connolly Jr. and Philip M. Meyers

Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) represent a rare cause of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. This case demonstrates an unusual DVA associated with venous hypertension, arteriovenous shunting, and a ruptured transitional aneurysm. The authors describe the first use of embolization as a treatment method for an unstable ruptured transitional aneurysm associated with a DVA. This 33-year-old man suffered acute onset of headache, gait ataxia, and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography brain scans demonstrated a deep paramedian right frontal intraparenchymal hemorrhage. No cavernous malformation was apparent on MR imaging. Diagnostic angiography revealed arteriovenous shunting from the right anterior and middle cerebral arteries to a large DVA with an associated arteriovenous fistula, with a 3-mm aneurysm in the transition from pericallosal artery to the collecting vein. Both surgical and endovascular treatment options were considered. The patient underwent repeat angiography on hospital Day 7, at which time the aneurysm had increased to 5 mm, and endovascular treatment was selected. Acrylic occlusion of the aneurysm was performed and confirmed angiographically. The patient's neurological symptoms resolved throughout the hospital stay, and he remains symptom free in the 10 months since treatment. Developmental venous anomalies are not usually associated with arteriovenous shunting and aneurysms as a source of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Endovascular occlusion of the aneurysm without blockage of physiologically necessary venous structures is a possible method of treatment for this complex mixed vascular lesion, and has proven safe and effective in this patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first presentation of this situation in the literature.

Restricted access

Adel M. Malek, Van V. Halbach, Stephen Holmes, Constantine C. Phatouros, Philip M. Meyers, Christopher F. Dowd and Randall T. Higashida

Restricted access

Christopher P. Kellner, Raqeeb M. Haque, Philip M. Meyers, Sean D. Lavine, E. Sander Connolly Jr. and Robert A. Solomon

Object

Complex aneurysms of the basilar artery (BA) apex can be successfully treated using surgical occlusion of the proximal BA. Since the introduction of the Guglielmi detachable coil in 1991, the focus on treating BA aneurysms has been on using endovascular techniques. Outcomes with endovascular techniques have been less than optimal for large and complex aneurysms. The authors therefore report on their current 22-year experience with surgical BA occlusion for complex BA aneurysms and long-term outcome.

Methods

Fifteen patients underwent surgical BA occlusion at Columbia University Medical Center for complex basilar apex aneurysms between 1987 and 2009. The clinical records of each patient were reviewed for details of presentation, hospital course, operative intervention, and outcome.

Results

Postoperatively, all patient encounters were recorded at discharge, at the 1-month and 1-year follow-up evaluations, and at long-term outcome. Twelve (80%) of 15 patients experienced no new postoperative neurological deficits. Three patients presenting with severe neurological impairment (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score > 3) made excellent recoveries (mRS Scores 1–2) at long-term follow-up. One patient died, 1 suffered a stroke during the postoperative angiogram which resulted in hemiparesis, and 1 suffered internuclear ophthalmoplegia which resolved by the 1-month follow-up. Long-term follow-up occurred at an average of 3 ± 4.5 years, ranging from 2 months (for a recently treated patient) to 18 years. The average mRS score at long-term follow-up was 1 ± 1.5. No patient experienced postoperative hemorrhage, rebleeding, or delayed neurological deterioration.

Conclusions

Surgical occlusion of the BA is an effective treatment option offering a high rate of angiographic cure in a single procedure for patients with complex BA aneurysms. The ability to surgically perform point occlusion of the BA without impairment of brainstem perforators, while maintaining collateral blood flow to the posterior circulation branch vessels, may provide an advantage compared with endovascular treatments.

Full access

J Mocco, Ricardo J. Komotar, Sean D. Lavine, Philip M. Meyers, E. Sander Connolly and Robert A. Solomon

Since the publication of preliminary results from the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in 1998 there has been a great deal of debate concerning the natural history of these lesions and their attendant risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Therefore, the authors reviewed a selected number of crucial studies concerning this topic to determine the best evidence-based estimate of a rupture rate for these lesions. Based on this analysis, the yearly risk of bleeding for an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is estimated to be approximately 1% for aneurysms 7 to 10 mm in diameter. This risk of rupture increases with aneurysm size and it likewise diminishes as the size of the lesion decreases. This general rule serves as a reasonable interpretation of the results reported in the current body of literature.

Full access

Ricardo J. Komotar, J Mocco, David A. Wilson, E. Sander Connolly Jr., Sean D. Lavine and Philip M. Meyers

A substantial number of strokes are caused by intracranial atherosclerosis, a disease that traditionally has been treated medically. Recent technological advancements, however, have revolutionized the treatment of this condition by enabling the use of endovascular methods. In this paper the authors focus on the internal carotid artery, and review relevant studies concerning angioplasty with stent placement for the management of intracranial atherosclerosis in this vessel. With continued experience and a multidisciplinary approach in the evaluation of these patients, favorable outcomes may be achieved.

Full access

Ricardo J. Komotar, J Mocco, David A. Wilson, E. Sander Connolly Jr., Sean D. Lavine and Philip M. Meyers

Intracranial atherosclerosis is the cause of a significant number of strokes. Despite maximal medical therapy, this disease continues to carry a poor prognosis. The authors reviewed studies in which the outcomes after conservative management in patients with intracranial carotid artery atherosclerosis were reported. Analysis of the literature demonstrates that maximal medical therapy frequently fails with this disease, leaving patients at high risk for cerebral infarction and death. A better understanding of the pathophysiological aspects and natural history of this condition may serve to guide clinical decision making and the choice of therapeutic options in this patient population.

Restricted access

Adel M. Malek, Randall T. Higashida, Van V. Halbach, Christopher F. Dowd, Constantine C. Phatouros, Todd E. Lempert, Philip M. Meyers, Wade S. Smith and Ronald Stoney

✓ Domestic violence leading to strangulation by an abusive spouse can cause carotid artery dissection. This phenomenon is rare and has been described in only three previous instances. The authors present their management strategies in three additional cases.

Three young women aged 24 to 43 years were victims of manual strangulation committed by their spouses 3 months to 1 year before presentation. Two of the patients suffered delayed cerebral infarctions before presentation and angiography demonstrated focal, mirror-image severe residual stenoses in the high-cervical internal carotid artery (ICA), which were characteristic of a healed chronic dissection; there was no evidence of fibromuscular dysplasia. One of these patients underwent unilateral percutaneous angioplasty with stent placement, and the other underwent bilateral percutaneous angioplasty. Both patients have recovered from their strokes and remain clinically stable at 8 and 20 months posttreatment, respectively. The third patient presented with bilateral ischemic frontal watershed infarctions resulting from an occluded left ICA and a severely narrowed right ICA. Given the extent of the established infarctions, this case was managed with a long-term regimen of anticoagulation medications, and the patient remains neurologically impaired.

These cases illustrate the susceptibility of the manually compressed ICA to traumatic injury as a result of domestic violence. They identify bilateral symmetrical ICA dissection as a consistent finding and the real danger of delayed stroke as a consequence of strangulation. Endovascular therapy in which percutaneous angioplasty and/or stent placement are used can be useful in treating residual focal stenoses to improve cerebral perfusion and to lower the risk of embolic or ischemic stroke.

Full access

Christopher P. Kellner, Michael M. McDowell, Michelle Q. Phan, E. Sander Connolly, Sean D. Lavine, Philip M. Meyers, Daniel Sahlein, Robert A. Solomon, Neil A. Feldstein and Richard C.E. Anderson

Object

The significance of draining vein anatomy is poorly defined in pediatric arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In adult cohorts, the presence of fewer veins has been shown to lead to an increased rate of hemorrhage, but this phenomenon has not yet been studied in pediatric AVMs. This report analyzes the impact of draining vein anatomy on presentation and outcome in a large series of pediatric AVMs.

Methods

Eighty-five pediatric patients with AVMs were treated at the Columbia University Medical Center between 1991 and 2012. Charts were retrospectively reviewed for patient characteristics, clinical course, neurological outcome, and AVM angioarchitectural features identified on the angiogram performed at presentation. Univariate analyses were performed using chi-square test and ANOVA when appropriate; multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression.

Results

Four patients were excluded due to incomplete records. Twenty-seven patients had 2 or 3 draining veins; 12 (44.4%) of these patients suffered from hemorrhage prior to surgery. Fifty-four patients had 1 draining vein; 39 (72.2%) of these 54 suffered from hemorrhage. Independent predictors of hemorrhage included the presence of a single draining vein (p = 0.04) and deep venous drainage (p = 0.02). Good outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score < 3) on discharge was found to be associated with higher admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores (p = 0.0001, OR 0.638, 95% CI 0.40–0.93). Poor outcome (mRS score > 2) on discharge was found to be associated with deep venous drainage (p = 0.04, OR 4.68, 95% CI 1.1–19.98). A higher admission GCS score was associated with a lower discharge mRS score (p = 0.0003, OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.46–0.79), and the presence of a single draining vein was associated with a lower mRS score on long-term follow-up (p = 0.04, OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.032–0.99).

Conclusions

The authors' data suggest that the presence of a single draining vein or deep venous drainage plays a role in hemorrhage risk and ultimate outcome in pediatric AVMs. Small AVMs with a single or deep draining vein may have the highest risk of hemorrhage.