Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author or Editor: Peng Qi x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Zhe Bao Wu, Chun Jiang Yu, Zhi Peng Su, Qi Chuan Zhuge, Jin Sen Wu and Wei Ming Zheng

Object

The aim of this study was to observe long-term clinical outcomes in a group of patients treated with bromocriptine for invasive giant prolactinomas involving the cavernous sinus.

Methods

Data from 20 patients with invasive giant prolactinomas at the authors’ institutions between July 1997 and June 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. The criteria to qualify for study participation included: 1) tumor diameter greater than 4 cm, invading the cavernous sinus to an extent corresponding to Grade III or IV in the classification scheme of Knosp and colleagues; 2) serum prolactin (PRL) level greater than 200 ng/ml; and 3) clinical signs of hyperprolactinemia and mass effect. Among the 20 patients who met the criteria, six had undergone unsuccessful transcranial or transsphenoidal microsurgery prior to bromocriptine treatment and 14 patients received bromocriptine as the primary treatment. Eleven of the 20 patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy.

After a mean follow-up period of 37.3 months, the clinical symptoms in all patients improved by different degrees. Tumor volume on magnetic resonance images was decreased by a mean of 93.3%. In 11 patients, the tumor had almost completely disappeared; in the other nine patients, residual tumor invaded the cavernous sinus. Visual symptoms improved in 13 of the patients who had presented with visual loss. Eight patients had normal PRL levels. The postoperative PRL level was more than 200 ng/ml in seven patients. During the course of drug administration, cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in one patient, who subsequently underwent transsphenoidal surgery. No case of apoplexy occurred during bromocriptine treatment.

Conclusions

Dopamine agonist medications are effective as a first-line therapy for invasive giant prolactinomas, because they can significantly shrink tumor volume and control the PRL level. Tumor mass vanishes in some patients after bromocriptine treatment; in other patients with localized residual tumor, stereotactic radiosurgery is a viable option so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The application of radiotherapy does not reliably shrink tumor volume.

Restricted access

Jun Fan, Yuping Peng, Songtao Qi, Xi-an Zhang, Binghui Qiu and Jun Pan

Object

An assessment regarding both surgical approaches and the extent of resection for Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) based on their locations has not been reported. The aim of this study was to report the results of a large series of surgically treated patients with RCCs and to evaluate the feasibility of individualized surgical strategies for different RCCs.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed 87 cases involving patients with RCCs (16 intrasellar, 50 intra- and suprasellar, and 21 purely suprasellar lesions). Forty-nine patients were treated via a transsphenoidal (TS) approach, and 38 were treated via a transcranial (TC) approach (traditional craniotomy in 21 cases and supraorbital keyhole craniotomy in 17). The extent of resection was classified as gross-total resection (GTR) or subtotal resection (STR) of the cyst wall. Patients were thus divided into 3 groups according to the approach selected and the extent of resection: TS/STR (n = 49), TC/STR (n = 23), and TC/GTR (n = 15).

Results

Preoperative headaches, visual dysfunction, hypopituitarism, and diabetes insipidus (DI) resolved in 85%, 95%, 55%, and 65% of patients, respectively. These rates did not differ significantly among the 3 groups. Overall, complications occurred in 8% of patients in TS/STR group, 9% in TC/STR group, and 47% in TC/GTR group, respectively (p = 0.002). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage (3%), new hypopituitarism (9%), and DI (6%) were observed after surgery. All CSF leaks occurred in the endonasal group, while the TC/GTR group showed a higher rate of postoperative hypopituitarism (p = 0.7 and p < 0.001, respectively). It should be particularly noted that preoperative hypopituitarism and DI returned to normal, respectively, in 100% and 83% of patients who underwent supraorbital surgery, and with the exception of 1 patient who had transient postoperative DI, there were no complications in patients treated with supraorbital surgery. Kaplan-Meier 3-year recurrence-free rates were 84%, 87%, and 86% in the TS/STR, TC/STR, and TC/GTR groups, respectively (p = 0.9).

Conclusions

It is reasonable to adopt individualized surgical strategies for RCCs based on cyst location. Gross-total resection does not appear to reduce the recurrence rate but increase the risk of postoperative complications. The endonasal approach seems more appropriate for primarily intrasellar RCCs, while the craniotomy is recommended for purely or mainly suprasellar cysts. The supraorbital route appears to be preferred over traditional craniotomy for its minimal invasiveness and favorable outcomes. The endoscopic technique is helpful for either endonasal or supraorbital surgery.

Full access

Xi-an Zhang, Song-tao Qi, Jun Fan, Guang-long Huang and Jun-xiang Peng

Object

The aim of this study was to describe the similarity of configuration between the arachnoid complex in the posterior half of the incisural space and the Liliequist membrane.

Methods

Microsurgical dissection and anatomical observation were performed in 20 formalin-fixed adult cadaver heads. The origin, distribution, and configuration of the arachnoid membranes and their relationships with the vascular structures in the posterior half of the incisural space were examined.

Results

The posterior perimesencephalic membrane and the cerebellar precentral membrane have a common origin at the tentorial edge and form an arachnoid complex strikingly resembling an inverted Liliequist membrane. Asymmetry between sides is not uncommon. If the cerebellar precentral membrane is hypoplastic on one side or both, the well-developed quadrigeminal membrane plays a prominent part in partitioning the subarachnoid space in the posterior half of the incisural space.

Conclusions

The arachnoid complex in the posterior half of the incisural space can be regarded as an inverted Liliequist membrane. This concept can help neurosurgeons to gain better understanding of the surgical anatomy at the level of the tentorial incisura.

Full access

Jun Fan, Songtao Qi, Yuping Peng, Xi-an Zhang, Binghui Qiu and Jun Pan

Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs) are benign cysts typically located in the sellar or suprasellar region; ectopic isolated lesions are extremely rare. The authors describe the case of a 25-year-old man with a giant symptomatic RCC arising primarily at the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), only the second case reported thus far. The patient presented with a 2-year history of right hearing impairment and tinnitus accompanied by vertigo and headache and a 2-week history of right facial numbness. Subsequently, he underwent total cyst removal via retrosigmoid craniotomy with a good recovery. He experienced no recurrence during a 64-month follow-up period. The possible pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and surgical treatment of such cysts are discussed in this article. Isolated ectopic RCCs can arise from the ectopic migration of Rathke's pouch cells during the embryonic period. It is still difficult to distinguish ectopic RCCs from other cystic lesions of the CPA given the lack of specific imaging features. Aggressive resection of the cyst wall is not recommended, except when lesions do not closely adhere to adjacent structures.

Full access

Jun Pan, Songtao Qi, Yi Liu, Yuntao Lu, Junxiang Peng, XiAn Zhang, YiKai Xu, Guang-long Huang and Jun Fan

OBJECT

Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are rare epithelial tumors that are often associated with an enigmatic and unpredictable growth pattern. Understanding the growth patterns of these tumors has a direct impact on surgical planning and may enhance the safety of radical tumor removal. The aim of this study was to analyze the growth patterns and surgical treatment of CPs with a focus on the involvement of the hypothalamopituitary axis and the relationship of the tumor to the arachnoid membrane and surrounding structures.

METHODS

Clinical data from 226 consecutive patients with primary CP were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor location and the relationship of the tumor to the third ventricle floor and the pituitary stalk were evaluated using preoperative MRI and intraoperative findings. A topographic classification scheme was proposed based on the site of tumor origin and tumor development. The clinical relevance of this classification on patient presentation and outcomes was also analyzed.

RESULTS

The growth of CPs can be broadly divided into 3 groups based on the site of tumor origin and on tumor-meningeal relationships: Group I, infrasellar/infradiaphragmatic CPs (Id-CPs), which mainly occurred in children; Group II, suprasellar subarachnoid extraventricular CPs (Sa-CPs), which were mainly observed in adults and rarely occurred in children; and Group III, suprasellar subpial ventricular CPs (Sp-CPs), which commonly occurred in both adults and children. Tumors in each group may develop complex growth patterns during vertical expansion along the pituitary stalk. Tumor growth patterns were closely related to both clinical presentation and outcomes. Patients with Sp-CPs had more prevalent weight gain than patients with Id-CPs or Sa-CPs; the rates of significant weight gain were 41.7% for children and 16.7% for adults with Sp-CPs, 2.2% and 7.1% for those with Id-CPs, and 12.5% and 2.6% for those with Sa-CPs (p < 0.001). Moreover, patients with Sp-CPs had increased hypothalamic dysfunction after radical removal; 39% of patients with Sp-CPs, 14.5% with Id-CPs, and 17.4% with Sa-CPs had high-grade hypothalamic dysfunction in the first 2 postoperative years (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

The classification of CPs based on growth pattern may elucidate the best course of treatment for this formidable tumor. More tailored, individualized surgical strategies based on tumor growth patterns are mandatory to provide long-term tumor control and to minimize damage to hypothalamic structures. Differences in the distribution of growth patterns between children and adults imply that hierarchical comparison is necessary when investigating outcomes and survival across treatment paradigms in patients with CP.

Full access

Yun Bao, Jun Pan, Song-tao Qi, Yun-tao Lu and Jun-xiang Peng

OBJECT

Craniopharyngiomas are associated with a high rate of recurrence. The surgical management of recurrent lesions has been among the most challenging neurosurgical procedures because of the craniopharyngioma's complex topographical relationship with surrounding structures. The aim of this study was to define the determinative role of the site of origin on the growth pattern and clinical features of recurrent craniopharyngiomas.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 52 patients who had undergone uniform treatment by a single surgeon. For each patient, data concerning symptoms and signs, imaging features, hypothalamic-pituitary function, and recurrence-free survival rate were collected.

RESULTS

For children, delayed puberty was more frequent in the group with Type I (infradiaphragmatic) craniopharyngioma than in the group with Type TS (tuberoinfundibular and suprasellar extraventricular) lesions (p < 0.05). For adults, blindness was more frequent in the Type I group than in the Type TS group (p < 0.05). Nausea or vomiting, delayed puberty, and growth retardation were more frequent in children than in adults (p < 0.05). Overall clinical outcome was good in 48.07% of the patients and poor in 51.92%. Patients with Type TS recurrent tumors had significantly worse functional outcomes and hypothalamic function than patients with the Type I recurrent tumors but better pituitary function especially in children.

CONCLUSIONS

The origin of recurrent craniopharyngiomas significantly affected the symptoms, signs, functional outcomes, and hypothalamic-pituitary functions of patients undergoing repeated surgery. Differences in tumor growth patterns and site of origin should be considered when one is comparing outcomes and survival across treatment paradigms in patients with recurrent craniopharyngiomas.

Restricted access

Wenhua Chen, Wei Xing, Zhongming He, Ya Peng, Caoye Wang and Qi Wang

OBJECTIVE

The study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 320-detector row nonsubtracted and subtracted volume CT angiography (VCTA) in detecting small cerebral aneurysms (< 3 mm) compared with 3D digital subtraction angiography (3D DSA).

METHODS

Six hundred sixty-two patients underwent 320-detector row VCTA and 3D DSA for suspected cerebral aneurysms. Five neuroradiologists independently reviewed VCTA and 3D DSA images. The 3D DSA was considered the reference standard, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of nonsubtracted and subtracted VCTA in depicting small aneurysms were analyzed. A p value < 0.05 was considered a significant difference.

RESULTS

According to 3D DSA images, 98 small cerebral aneurysms were identified in 90 of 662 patients. Nonsubtracted VCTA depicted 90 small aneurysms. Ten small aneurysms were missed, and 2 small aneurysms were misdiagnosed. The missed small aneurysms were located almost in the internal carotid artery, near bone tissue. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of nonsubtracted VCTA in depicting small aneurysms were 89.8%, 99.2%, and 96.5%, respectively, on a per-aneurysm basis. Subtracted VCTA depicted 97 small aneurysms. Three small aneurysms were missed, and 2 small aneurysms were misdiagnosed. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of subtracted VCTA in depicting small aneurysms were 96.9%, 99.2%, and 98.6%, respectively, on a per-aneurysm basis. There was no difference in accuracy between subtracted VCTA and 3D DSA (p = 1.000). However, nonsubtracted VCTA had significantly less sensitivity than 3D DSA and subtracted VCTA (p = 0.039 and 0.016, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Subtracted 320-detector row VCTA is sensitive enough to replace 3D DSA in the diagnosis of small cerebral aneurysms (< 3 mm). The accuracy rate of nonsubtracted VCTA was lower than that of subtracted VCTA and 3D DSA, especially in the assessment of small internal carotid artery aneurysms adjacent to the skull base.

Full access

Jacob A. Miller, Ehsan H. Balagamwala, Camille A. Berriochoa, Lilyana Angelov, John H. Suh, Edward C. Benzel, Alireza M. Mohammadi, Todd Emch, Anthony Magnelli, Andrew Godley, Peng Qi and Samuel T. Chao

OBJECTIVE

Spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a safe and effective treatment for spinal metastases. However, it is unknown whether this highly conformal radiation technique is suitable at instrumented sites given the potential for microscopic disease seeding. The authors hypothesized that spinal decompression with instrumentation is not associated with increased local failure (LF) following SRS.

METHODS

A 2:1 propensity-matched retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing SRS for spinal metastasis was conducted. Patients with less than 1 month of radiographic follow-up were excluded. Each SRS treatment with spinal decompression and instrumentation was propensity matched to 2 controls without decompression or instrumentation on the basis of demographic, disease-related, dosimetric, and treatment-site characteristics. Standardized differences were used to assess for balance between matched cohorts.

The primary outcome was the 12-month cumulative incidence of LF, with death as a competing risk. Lesions demonstrating any in-field progression were considered LFs. Secondary outcomes of interest were post-SRS pain flare, vertebral compression fracture, instrumentation failure, and any Grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Cumulative incidences analysis was used to estimate LF in each cohort, which were compared via Gray’s test. Multivariate competing-risks regression was then used to adjust for prespecified covariates.

RESULTS

Of 650 candidates for the control group, 166 were propensity matched to 83 patients with instrumentation. Baseline characteristics were well balanced. The median prescription dose was 16 Gy in each cohort. The 12-month cumulative incidence of LF was not statistically significantly different between cohorts (22.8% [instrumentation] vs 15.8% [control], p = 0.25). After adjusting for the prespecified covariates in a multivariate competing-risks model, decompression with instrumentation did not contribute to a greater risk of LF (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.74–1.98, p = 0.45). The incidences of post-SRS pain flare (11% vs 14%, p = 0.55), vertebral compression fracture (12% vs 22%, p = 0.04), and Grade ≥ 3 toxicity (1% vs 1%, p = 1.00) were not increased at instrumented sites. No instrumentation failures were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

In this propensity-matched analysis, LF and toxicity were similar among cohorts, suggesting that decompression with instrumentation does not significantly impact the efficacy or safety of spine SRS. Accordingly, spinal instrumentation may not be a contraindication to SRS. Future studies comparing SRS to conventional radiotherapy at instrumented sites in matched populations are warranted.

Restricted access

Chao-hu Wang, Song-Tao Qi, Jun Fan, Jun Pan, Jun-Xiang Peng, Jing Nie, Yun Bao, Ya-Wei Liu, Xi’an Zhang and Yi Liu

OBJECTIVE

Nuclear β-catenin, a hallmark of active canonical Wnt signaling, can be histologically detected in a subset of cells and cell clusters in up to 94% of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) samples. However, it is unclear whether nuclear β-catenin–containing cells within human ACPs possess the characteristics of tumor stem cells, and it is unknown what role these cells have in ACP.

METHODS

Primary ACP cells were cultured from 12 human ACP samples. Adamantinomatous CP stem cell–like cells (CSLCs) showing CD44 positivity were isolated from the cultured primary ACP cells by performing magnetic-activated cell sorting. The tumor sphere formation, cell cycle distribution, stemness marker expression, and multidifferentiation potential of the CD44− cells and the CSLCs were analyzed.

RESULTS

Compared with the CD44− cells, the cultured human CSLCs formed tumor spheres and expressed CD44 and CD133; moreover, these cells demonstrated nuclear translocation of β-catenin. In addition, the CSLCs demonstrated osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacities compared with the CD44− cells. The CSLCs also displayed the capacity for tumor initiation in human–mouse xenografts.

CONCLUSIONS

These results indicate that CSLCs play an important role in ACP development, calcification, and cystic degeneration.

Restricted access

Shireen Parsai, Aditya Juloori, Lilyana Angelov, Jacob G. Scott, Ajit A. Krishnaney, Inyang Udo-Inyang, Tingliang Zhuang, Peng Qi, Matthew Kolar, Peter Anderson, Stacey Zahler, Samuel T. Chao, John H. Suh and Erin S. Murphy

OBJECTIVE

There are limited data on spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in treating adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients. SRS has the advantages of highly conformal radiation dose delivery in the upfront and retreatment settings, means for dose intensification, and administration over a limited number of sessions leading to a decreased treatment burden. In this study, the authors report the oncological and toxicity outcomes for AYA patients with metastatic sarcoma treated with spine radiosurgery and provide clinicians a guide for considerations in dose, volume, and fractionation.

METHODS

An institutional review board–approved database of patients treated with SRS in the period from October 2014 through December 2018 was queried. AYA patients, defined by ages 15–29 years, who had been treated with SRS for spine metastases from Ewing sarcoma or osteosarcoma were included in this analysis. Patients with follow-ups shorter than 6 months after SRS were excluded. Local control, overall survival, and toxicity were reported.

RESULTS

Seven patients with a total of 11 treated lesions were included in this study. Median patient age was 20.3 years (range 15.1–26.1 years). Three patients had Ewing sarcoma (6 lesions) and 4 patients had osteosarcoma (5 lesions). The median dose delivered was 35 Gy in 5 fractions (range 16–40 Gy, 1–5 fractions). The median follow-up was 11.1 months (range 6.8–26.0 months). Three local failures were observed within the follow-up period. No acute grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. One patient developed late grade 3 toxicity consisting of radiation enteritis. This patient had previously received radiation to an overlapping volume with conventional fractionation. SRS re-irradiation for this patient was also performed concurrently with chemotherapy administration. No late grade 4 or higher toxicities were observed. No pain flare or vertebral compression fracture was observed. Three patients died within the follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

SRS for spine metastases from Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma can be considered as a treatment option in AYA patients and is associated with acceptable toxicity rates. Further studies must be conducted to determine long-term local control and toxicity for this treatment modality.