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Konstantinos Margetis, Paul J. Christos, and Mark Souweidane

Object

Incidental colloid cysts are frequently managed with surveillance imaging rather than surgical excision. This approach is born out of their purported indolent growth pattern and the surgical morbidity associated with microsurgical removal. The advent of endoscopic colloid cyst removal may offer renewed assessment of these patients who carry a risk of acute neurological deterioration. An evidence-based recommendation should weigh the risks of operative treatment. Thus far, there has been no concentrated assessment of cyst removal in patients with incidental colloid cysts. The major objective in this study was to define the risks associated with the endoscopic surgical removal of incidentally diagnosed colloid cysts

Methods

A retrospective review of the medical records was performed to search for patients evaluated for a colloid cyst between the years 1996 and 2012. Eighty-seven patients underwent colloid cyst resection, and 34 were managed with nonoperative surveillance imaging. Microsurgical resections, endoscopic resections of residual or recurrent colloid cysts, and cases with unknown preoperative symptomatic status were excluded from further analysis. Seventy-seven cases of primary endoscopic resections were identified. Twenty resections were performed in patients with an incidental diagnosis and 57 in symptomatic individuals. Presenting characteristics and surgical outcomes were compared between the incidental and symptomatic groups.

Results

The mean age at surgery was 39.65 years for the incidental and 43.31 years for the symptomatic group (p = 0.36). The median maximal cyst diameter was 9.7 mm (range 3–31 mm) for the incidental and 12 mm (range 5–34 mm) for the symptomatic group. The mean frontal and occipital horn ratio was 0.3928 for the incidental and 0.4445 for the symptomatic group (p = 0.002). Total resection was achieved in 90% of the incidental and 82.3% of the symptomatic cases (p = 0.49). The median hospital stay was 1 day for incidental and 2 days for symptomatic cases (p = 0.006). There were no deaths. There was one case of aseptic meningitis in the incidental group. In the symptomatic group there were 3 complications: one patient with subjective memory impairment, one with transient short-term memory deterioration, and another with a superficial wound infection treated with operative debridement. Two patients from the symptomatic group needed a CSF diversion procedure, and no shunting was needed in the incidental group. There were two recurrences in the symptomatic group (78 and 133 months postoperatively) and none in the incidental group (p = 1).

Conclusions

Age and cyst diameter were not correlated with the absence or presence of symptoms in patients with a colloid cyst of the third ventricle. Operative results were highly favorable in both groups and did not reveal a higher risk of morbidity in the patient presenting with an incidental lesion. The results support endoscopic resection as a legitimate therapeutic option for patients with incidental colloid cysts. Generalization of the operative results should be cautiously made, since this is a limited series and the results may depend on the degree of neuroendoscopic experience.

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Collin C. Tebo, Alexander I. Evins, Paul J. Christos, Jennifer Kwon, and Theodore H. Schwartz

Object

Surgical interventions for medically refractory epilepsy are effective in selected patients, but they are underutilized. There remains a lack of pooled data on complication rates and their changes over a period of multiple decades. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of reported complications from intracranial epilepsy surgery from 1980 to 2012.

Methods

A literature search was performed to find articles published between 1980 and 2012 that contained at least 2 patients. Patients were divided into 3 groups depending on the procedure they underwent: A) temporal lobectomy with or without amygdalohippocampectomy, B) extratemporal lobar or multilobar resections, or C) invasive electrode placement. Articles were divided into 2 time periods, 1980–1995 and 1996–2012.

Results

Sixty-one articles with a total of 5623 patients met the study's eligibility criteria. Based on the 2 time periods, neurological deficits decreased dramatically from 41.8% to 5.2% in Group A and from 30.2% to 19.5% in Group B. Persistent neurological deficits in these 2 groups decreased from 9.7% to 0.8% and from 9.0% to 3.2%, respectively. Wound infections/meningitis decreased from 2.5% to 1.1% in Group A and from 5.3% to 1.9% in Group B. Persistent neurological deficits were uncommon in Group C, although wound infections/meningitis and hemorrhage/hematoma increased over time from 2.3% to 4.3% and from 1.9% to 4.2%, respectively. These complication rates are additive in patients undergoing implantation followed by resection.

Conclusions

Complication rates have decreased dramatically over the last 30 years, particularly for temporal lobectomy, but they remain an unavoidable consequence of epilepsy surgery. Permanent neurological deficits are rare following epilepsy surgery compared with the long-term risks of intractable epilepsy.

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Jeffrey P. Greenfield, Caitlin Hoffman, Eugenia Kuo, Paul J. Christos, and Mark M. Souweidane

Object

The authors' aim in this study was to determine if standardizing the evaluation of intraoperative findings during endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) could predict patients with hydrocephalus in whom endoscopic treatment will fail and require ventriculoperitoneal shunt treatment. The creation of a uniform scale with predictive outcomes may reduce returns to the operating room for shunt treatment and reliance on postoperative externalized ventricular monitoring and MR imaging.

Methods

The authors evaluated the preoperative history, intraoperative findings, and postoperative monitoring and imaging findings in 109 consecutive patients undergoing 112 consecutive attempted ETVs for obstructive hydrocephalus. A 5-grade scale was developed to assess preoperative risk factors and intraoperative evaluation to unify criteria that have been suspected to influence outcome independently. A grade of 0 was assigned to patients with no negative predictors, whereas increasing scores were assigned to patients who had multiple preoperative and intraoperative risks identified. Patients' grades were compared with outcome of the procedure, utility of externalized ventricular monitoring, and results of postoperative MR imaging.

Results

Of 112 ETVs, 77 were successful and 35 were unsuccessful. Fifty-nine patients received a grade of 0, 27 received a grade of 1, 11 received a grade of 2, and 15 received a grade of ≥ 3. In all 15 patients receiving a grade ≥ 3 attempted ETV procedures failed, and the patients required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative monitoring with externalized ventricular drains and MR images demonstrating radiographic evidence of flow was independently less reliable than intraoperative grading in predicting success. Patients with a grade of 0 almost uniformly had successful surgery, independent of MR imaging findings. Patients with a grade of 1 or 2 who had successful surgery almost always lacked negative intraoperative predictive findings.

Conclusions

Despite reliance in recent years on post-ETV MR images and externalized ventricular monitoring, these modalities, although often useful adjuncts, appear less reliable as predictive tests than a simple assessment at the time of endoscopic fenestration. By using a uniform grading scale, the authors have introduced a novel means through which intraoperative and postoperative decision making can be aided, with the goal of reducing unnecessary procedures and tests and preventing unnecessary returns to the operating room.

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Neal Luther, William R. Stetler Jr., Ira J. Dunkel, Paul J. Christos, John C. Wellons III, and Mark M. Souweidane

Object

Endoscopic biopsy with concomitant third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a well-established diagnostic and therapeutic maneuver in patients presenting with noncommunicating hydrocephalus resulting from a tumor of the pineal region or posterior third ventricle. Fenestration of the floor of the third ventricle theoretically provides a conduit for the subarachnoid dissemination of an intraventricular tumor. The aim of this study was to ascertain the rate of leptomeningeal dissemination following this surgical procedure.

Methods

The authors conducted a review of all patients for whom an ETV and simultaneous endoscopic biopsy procedure or tumor resection had been performed at their institutions between 1995 and 2008. Patients were divided into high or low risk groups by leptomeningeal metastatic potential based on pathology. All available postoperative clinical and radiographic data, including MR imaging of the brain and spinal cord, as well as CSF sampling were evaluated when available. A review of the literature was then conducted to establish rates of distant leptomeningeal dissemination for comparative purposes.

Results

Thirty-two patients satisfied the criteria for study inclusion. Pathology revealed that 22 had a high risk for leptomeningeal dissemination. New leptomeningeal disease (1 yolk sac tumor and 1 pineoblastoma) occurred in 2 patients. The median clinical and brain MR imaging follow-ups overall were 34 (range 2–103 months) and 38 months (range 1–94 months), respectively. Follow-up MR imaging of the spine was performed in 12 patients (median 7 months postoperation), and CSF was analyzed in 15 patients (median 1 month postoperation). A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis predicted a 2-year metastasis-free survival of 94.7% for high-risk patients. Baseline rates of dissemination when ETV was not performed were in general between 8 and 24% for various high-risk pathologies according to a literature review.

Conclusions

The rate of leptomeningeal metastasis of tumors in this biopsy and ETV study was not increased when compared with rates from large series in the literature.

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Diana A. Roth O’Brien, Sydney M. Kaye, Phillip J. Poppas, Sean S. Mahase, Anjile An, Paul J. Christos, Benjamin Liechty, David Pisapia, Rohan Ramakrishna, AG Wernicke, Jonathan P. S. Knisely, Susan C. Pannullo, and Theodore H. Schwartz

OBJECTIVE

Publications on adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are largely limited to patients completing SRS within a specified time frame. The authors assessed real-world local recurrence (LR) for all brain metastasis (BM) patients referred for SRS and identified predictors of SRS timing.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively identified BM patients undergoing resection and referred for SRS between 2012 and 2018. Patients were categorized by time to SRS, as follows: 1) ≤ 4 weeks, 2) > 4–8 weeks, 3) > 8 weeks, and 4) never completed. The relationships between timing of SRS and LR, LR-free survival (LRFS), and survival were investigated, as well as predictors of and reasons for specific SRS timing.

RESULTS

In a cohort of 159 patients, the median age at resection was 64.0 years, 56.5% of patients were female, and 57.2% were in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class II. The median preoperative tumor diameter was 2.9 cm, and gross-total resection was achieved in 83.0% of patients. All patients were referred for SRS, but 20 (12.6%) did not receive it. The LR rate was 22.6%, and the time to SRS was correlated with the LR rate: 2.3% for patients receiving SRS at ≤ 4 weeks postoperatively, 14.5% for SRS at > 4–8 weeks (p = 0.03), and 48.5% for SRS at > 8 weeks (p < 0.001). No LR difference was seen between patients whose SRS was delayed by > 8 weeks and those who never completed SRS (48.5% vs 50.0%; p = 0.91). A similar relationship emerged between time to SRS and LRFS (p < 0.01). Non–small cell lung cancer pathology (p = 0.04), earlier year of treatment (p < 0.01), and interval from brain MRI to SRS (p < 0.01) were associated with longer intervals to SRS. The rates of receipt of systemic therapy also differed significantly between patients by category of time to SRS (p = 0.02). The most common reasons for intervals of > 4–8 weeks were logistic, whereas longer delays or no SRS were caused by management of systemic disease or comorbidities.

CONCLUSIONS

Available data on LR rates after adjuvant SRS are often obtained from carefully preselected patients receiving timely treatment, whereas significantly less information is available on the efficacy of adjuvant SRS in patients treated under “real-world” conditions. Management of these patients may merit reconsideration, particularly when SRS is not delivered within ≤ 4 weeks of resection. The results of this study indicate that a substantial number of patients referred for SRS either never receive it or are treated > 8 weeks postoperatively, at which time the SRS-treated patients have an LR risk equivalent to that of patients who never received SRS. Increased attention to the reasons for prolonged intervals from surgery to SRS and strategies for reducing them is needed to optimize treatment. For patients likely to experience delays, other radiotherapy techniques may be considered.

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John A. Boockvar, Apostolos J. Tsiouris, Christoph P. Hofstetter, Ilhami Kovanlikaya, Sherese Fralin, Kartik Kesavabhotla, Stephen M. Seedial, Susan C. Pannullo, Theodore H. Schwartz, Philip Stieg, Robert D. Zimmerman, Jared Knopman, Ronald J. Scheff, Paul Christos, Shankar Vallabhajosula, and Howard A. Riina

Object

The authors assessed the safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of bevacizumab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol in patients with recurrent malignant glioma.

Methods

A total of 30 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study.

Results

The authors report no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of bevacizumab up to 15 mg/kg after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. Two groups of patients were studied; those without prior bevacizumab exposure (naïve patients; Group I) and those who had received previous intravenous bevacizumab (exposed patients; Group II). Radiographic changes demonstrated on MR imaging were assessed at 1 month postprocedure. In Group I patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 34.7%, a median reduction in the volume of tumor enhancement of 46.9%, a median MR perfusion (MRP) reduction of 32.14%, and a T2-weighted/FLAIR signal decrease in 9 (47.4%) of 19 patients. In Group II patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 15.2%, a median volume reduction of 8.3%, a median MRP reduction of 25.5%, and a T2-weighted FLAIR decrease in 0 (0%) of 11 patients.

Conclusions

The authors conclude that SIACI of mannitol followed by bevacizumab (up to 15 mg/kg) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. Magnetic resonance imaging shows that SIACI treatment with bevacizumab can lead to reduction in tumor area, volume, perfusion, and T2-weighted/FLAIR signal.

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Lennart Riemann, Daphne C. Voormolen, Katrin Rauen, Klaus Zweckberger, Andreas Unterberg, Alexander Younsi, and the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) Investigators and Participants

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this paper was to evaluate the prevalence of postconcussive symptoms and their relation to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric and adolescent patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) who received head CT imaging during initial assessment.

METHODS

Patients aged between 5 and 21 years with mTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale scores 13–15) and available Rivermead Post Concussion Questionnaire (RPQ) at 6 months of follow-up in the multicenter, prospectively collected CENTER-TBI (Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in TBI) study were included. The prevalence of postconcussive symptoms was assessed, and the occurrence of postconcussive syndrome (PSC) based on the ICD-10 criteria, was analyzed. HRQOL was compared in patients with and without PCS using the Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) questionnaire.

RESULTS

A total of 196 adolescent or pediatric mTBI patients requiring head CT imaging were included. High-energy trauma was prevalent in more than half of cases (54%), abnormalities on head CT scans were detected in 41%, and admission to the regular ward or intensive care unit was necessary in 78%. Six months postinjury, 36% of included patients had experienced at least one moderate or severe symptom on the RPQ. PCS was present in 13% of adolescents and children when considering symptoms of at least moderate severity, and those patients had significantly lower QOLIBRI total scores, indicating lower HRQOL, compared with young patients without PCS (57 vs 83 points, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescent and pediatric mTBI patients requiring head CT imaging show signs of increased trauma severity. Postconcussive symptoms are present in up to one-third of those patients, and PCS can be diagnosed in 13% 6 months after injury. Moreover, PCS is significantly associated with decreased HRQOL.