Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 64 items for

  • Author or Editor: Paul A. Anderson x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

James T. Bernatz and Paul A. Anderson

OBJECT

The rate of 30-day readmissions is rapidly gaining significance as a quality metric and is increasingly used to evaluate performance. An analysis of the present 30-day readmission rate in the spine literature is needed to aid the development of policies to decrease the frequency of readmissions. The authors examine 2 questions: 1) What is the 30-day readmission rate as reported in the spine literature? 2) What study factors impact the rate of 30-day readmissions?

METHODS

This study was registered with Prospera (CRD42014015319), and 4 electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) were searched for articles. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the current 30-day readmission rate in spine surgery. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. The readmission rate as well as data source, time from enrollment, sample size, demographics, procedure type and spine level, risk factors for readmission, and causes of readmission were extrapolated from each study.

RESULTS

The pooled 30-day readmission rate was 5.5% (95% CI 4.2%–7.4%). Studies from single institutions reported the highest 30-day readmission rate at 6.6% (95% CI 3.8%–11.1%), while multicenter studies reported the lowest at 4.7% (95% CI 2.3%–9.7%). Time from enrollment had no statistically significant effect on the 30-day readmission rate. Studies including all spinal levels had a higher 30-day readmission rate (6.1%, 95% CI 4.1%–8.9%) than exclusively lumbar studies (4.6%, 95% CI 2.5%–8.2%); however, the difference between the 2 rates was not statistically significant (p = 0.43). The most frequently reported risk factors associated with an increased odds of 30-day readmission on multivariate analysis were an American Society of Anesthesiology score of 4+, operative duration, and Medicare/Medicaid insurance. The most common cause of readmission was wound complication (39.3%).

CONCLUSIONS

The 30-day readmission rate following spinal surgery is between 4.2% and 7.4%. The range, rather than the exact result, should be considered given the significant heterogeneity among studies, which indicates that there are factors such as demographics, procedure types, and individual institutional factors that are important and affect this outcome variable. The pooled analysis of risk factors and causes of readmission is limited by the lack of reporting in most of the spine literature.

Free access

Robert F. Heary, Paul A. Anderson and Paul M. Arnold

Free access

Paul M. Arnold, Paul A. Anderson and Robert F. Heary

Free access

Paul A. Anderson, Paul M. Arnold and Robert F. Heary

Restricted access

Timothy A. Moore, Michael P. Steinmetz and Paul A. Anderson

Thoracolumbar fracture-dislocations are devastating injuries. They usually require surgical reduction and stabilization. The authors present a novel technique for reducing these injuries that is predictable and reproducible.

Restricted access

Paul R. Gigante, Neil A. Feldstein and Richard C. E. Anderson

Os odontoideum is a common cause of atlantoaxial instability in the pediatric population. The authors present the cases of 2 patients whose initial clinical presentation and MR imaging findings were suggestive of an intramedullary neoplasm, but whose ultimate diagnosis was determined to be cervical spine instability and cord injury due to os odontoideum.

Restricted access

Paul A. Anderson, Cliff B. Tribus and Scott H. Kitchel

Object

Interspinous process decompression (IPD) theoretically relieves narrowing of the spinal canal and neural foramen in extension and thus reduces the symptoms of neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC). The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of IPD with nonoperative treatment in patients with NIC secondary to degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Methods

The authors conducted a randomized controlled study in patients with NIC; they compared the results obtained in patients treated with the X STOP IPD device with those acquired in patients treated nonoperatively. The X STOP implant is a titanium alloy device that is placed between the spinous processes to reduce the canal and foraminal narrowing that occurs in extension. In a cohort of 75 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 42 underwent surgical treatment in which the X STOP IPD device was placed and 33 control individuals were treated nonoperatively. Patients underwent serial follow-up evaluations. The Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and radiographic assessment were used to determine outcomes. Two-year follow-up data were obtained in 70 of 75 patients.

Statistically significant improvement in ZCQ and SF-36 scores was seen in X STOP device–treated patients but not in the nonoperative control patients at all postoperative intervals. Overall clinical success occurred in 63.4% of X STOP device–treated patients and only 12.9% of controls. Spondylolisthesis and kyphosis were unaltered.

Conclusions

The X STOP device was more effective than nonoperative treatment in the management of NIC secondary to degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

Full access

Anthony L. Mikula, Seth K. Williams and Paul A. Anderson

OBJECT

Insertion of instruments or implants into the spine carries a risk for injury to neural tissue. Triggered electromyography (tEMG) is an intraoperative neuromonitoring technique that involves electrical stimulation of a tool or screw and subsequent measurement of muscle action potentials from myotomes innervated by nerve roots near the stimulated instrument. The authors of this study sought to determine the ability of tEMG to detect misplaced pedicle screws (PSs).

METHODS

The authors searched the US National Library of Medicine, the Web of Science Core Collection database, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for PS studies. A meta-analysis of these studies was performed on a per-screw basis to determine the ability of tEMG to detect misplaced PSs. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) were calculated overall and in subgroups.

RESULTS

Twenty-six studies were included in the systematic review. The authors analyzed 18 studies in which tEMG was used during PS placement in the meta-analysis, representing data from 2932 patients and 15,065 screws. The overall sensitivity of tEMG for detecting misplaced PSs was 0.78, and the specificity was 0.94. The overall ROC AUC was 0.96. A tEMG current threshold of 10–12 mA (ROC AUC 0.99) and a pulse duration of 300 µsec (ROC AUC 0.97) provided the most accurate testing parameters for detecting misplaced screws. Screws most accurately conducted EMG signals (ROC AUC 0.98).

CONCLUSIONS

Triggered electromyography has very high specificity but only fair sensitivity for detecting malpositioned PSs.

Free access

Joseph J. Schreiber, Paul A. Anderson and Wellington K. Hsu

Assessing local bone quality on CT scans with Hounsfield unit (HU) quantification is being used with increasing frequency. Correlations between HU and bone mineral density have been established, and normative data have been defined throughout the spine. Recent investigations have explored the utility of HU values in assessing fracture risk, implant stability, and spinal fusion success. The information provided by a simple HU measurement can alert the treating physician to decreased bone quality, which can be useful in both medically and surgically managing these patients.

Free access

Lee A. Tan, Carter S. Gerard, Paul A. Anderson and Vincent C. Traynelis

Object

Iatrogenic foraminal stenosis is a well-known complication in cervical spine surgery. Machined interfacet allograft spacers can provide a large surface area, which ensures solid support, and could potentially increase foraminal space. The authors tested the hypothesis that machined interfacet allograft spacers increase cervical foraminal height and area.

Methods

The C4–5, C5–6, and C6–7 facets of 4 fresh adult cadavers were exposed, and the cartilage was removed from each facet using customized rasps. Machined allograft spacers were tamped into the joints. The spines were scanned with the O-arm surgical imaging system before and after placement of the spacers. Two individuals independently measured foraminal height and area on obliquely angled sagittal images.

Results

Foraminal height and area were significantly greater following placement of the machined interfacet spacers at all levels. The Pearson correlation between the 2 radiographic reviewers was very strong (r = 0.971, p = 0.0001), as was the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.907, p = 0.0001). The average increase in foraminal height was 1.38 mm. The average increase in foraminal area was 18.4% (0.097 mm2).

Conclusions

Modest distraction of the facets using machined interfacet allograft spacers can increase foraminal height and area and therefore indirectly decompress the exiting nerve roots. This technique can be useful in treating primary foraminal stenosis and also for preventing iatrogenic foraminal stenosis that may occur when the initially nonlordotic spine is placed into lordosis either with repositioning after central canal decompression or with correction using instrumentation. These grafts may be a useful adjunct to the surgical treatment of cervical spine disease.