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Corey Raffel

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Alexandre Roux, Kévin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Nizar Mahlaoui, Fabrice Chretien, Pascale Varlet, Stéphanie Puget, and Johan Pallud

OBJECTIVE

Transitional care in surgical neurooncology is poorly studied. However, this period is pivotal, since it allows the patient to be empowered in his or her disease management. Here, the authors describe the experience of the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospital collaboration.

METHODS

The mixed transitional consultations started in September 2019 in a dedicated space for transitional care, named the “La Suite” department, located in the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France. The authors organized planned consultations to schedule the clinical and radiological follow-up in the adult neurosurgical department but also emergency consultations to manage tumor recurrence in young adult patients. Transitional care was performed jointly by pediatric and adult neurosurgeons who have developed clinical and research skills in the field of surgical neurooncology. Neuropathological analysis was performed by a neuropathologist who is specialized in pediatric and adult neurooncology.

RESULTS

Fourteen patients benefited from a mixed transitional consultation. All of them accepted to start their management in an adult neurosurgical environment. Eleven patients (78.6%) for whom the disease was controlled benefited from a planned consultation. Three patients (21.4%) required rapid neurosurgical management for a tumor recurrence (n = 2) or for a new primary CNS tumor (n = 1) and benefited from an emergency consultation.

CONCLUSIONS

For adult patients harboring a brain tumor during childhood or adolescence, the authors suggest that neurosurgeons specialized in adult surgical neurooncology with a full knowledge in pediatric neurooncology will combine the required skills to optimize care management for these patients within a dedicated multidisciplinary organization framework.

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Alexandre Roux, Kévin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Nizar Mahlaoui, Fabrice Chretien, Pascale Varlet, Stéphanie Puget, and Johan Pallud

OBJECTIVE

Transitional care in surgical neurooncology is poorly studied. However, this period is pivotal, since it allows the patient to be empowered in his or her disease management. Here, the authors describe the experience of the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospital collaboration.

METHODS

The mixed transitional consultations started in September 2019 in a dedicated space for transitional care, named the “La Suite” department, located in the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France. The authors organized planned consultations to schedule the clinical and radiological follow-up in the adult neurosurgical department but also emergency consultations to manage tumor recurrence in young adult patients. Transitional care was performed jointly by pediatric and adult neurosurgeons who have developed clinical and research skills in the field of surgical neurooncology. Neuropathological analysis was performed by a neuropathologist who is specialized in pediatric and adult neurooncology.

RESULTS

Fourteen patients benefited from a mixed transitional consultation. All of them accepted to start their management in an adult neurosurgical environment. Eleven patients (78.6%) for whom the disease was controlled benefited from a planned consultation. Three patients (21.4%) required rapid neurosurgical management for a tumor recurrence (n = 2) or for a new primary CNS tumor (n = 1) and benefited from an emergency consultation.

CONCLUSIONS

For adult patients harboring a brain tumor during childhood or adolescence, the authors suggest that neurosurgeons specialized in adult surgical neurooncology with a full knowledge in pediatric neurooncology will combine the required skills to optimize care management for these patients within a dedicated multidisciplinary organization framework.

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Vladislav Pavlov, Pascale Varlet, Fabrice Chretien, Geneviève Nguyen, and Johan Pallud

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Johan Pallud, Edouard Dezamis, Etienne Audureau, Bertrand Devaux, Raphaëlle Souillard-Scemama, Nader Sanai, Philippe Page, Frédéric Beuvon, Maria Koziak, Catherine Oppenheim, Frédéric Dhermain, Michel Schlienger, Jean-François Meder, François-Xavier Roux, and Pascale Varlet

Object

In this study, the authors address whether neurofilament protein (NFP) expression can be used as an independent prognostic factor in primary glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs).

Methods

Three hundred and two consecutive adult patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial primary GBMs were analyzed (January 2000–August 2008). Detailed data regarding clinical, imaging, and pathological findings, oncological treatments, and outcomes were recorded. Neurofilament protein immunoexpression served to identify NFP-positive tumor cells (normal entrapped neurons and mature ganglion-like cells excluded).

Results

Neurofilament-positive cells were identified in 177 GBMs (58.6%). Patients with NFP-positive GBMs were younger (p < 0.0001), and their GBMs presented with more temporal lobe tumor localization (p = 0.029) and more cortical involvement (p = 0.0003). Neurofilament-negative GBMs presented with more ventricular contact (p < 0.0001) and more tumor midline crossing (p = 0.03). Median overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were 13.0 and 7.6 months, respectively, for NFP-positive GBMs, and 7.0 and 5.1 months, respectively, for NFP-negative GBMs. Multivariate analysis revealed NFP immunoexpression, tumor midline crossing, complete resection, and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy as independent factors associated with overall survival. Neurofilament protein–positive immunoexpression was associated with longer overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.74; p < 0.0001) and longer PFS (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.53–0.96; p = 0.02).

Conclusions

Neurofilament protein–positive immunoexpression represents a strong, therapeutically independent prognostic factor for primary supratentorial GBM clinical outcome among adult patients. Neurofilament protein–GBM's unique pathological features are not only associated with distinct clinical and anatomical behavior, but are also predictive of overall patient survival and PFS. Neurofilament protein immunoexpression may help identify a distinct subgroup of primary GBMs with a favorable prognosis, which should be considered in the design of future targeted therapies.

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Forniceal glioma in children

Clinical article

Thomas Blauwblomme, Pascale Varlet, John R. Goodden, Marie Laure Cuny, Helene Piana, Thomas Roujeau, Federico DiRocco, Jacques Grill, Virginie Kieffer, Nathalie Boddaert, Christian Sainte-Rose, and Stéphanie Puget

Object

Five to ten percent of pediatric brain tumors are located in the ventricles. Among them, forniceal lesions are rare and their management has not often been described. The aim of this study was to review the clinical, radiological, and histopathological features as well as the feasibility of surgical excision and the outcomes in these patients.

Methods

From a retrospective analysis of 250 cases of supratentorial pediatric glioma, the records of 8 children presenting with forniceal lesions were selected and reviewed.

Results

The median age of patients in the cohort was 13.5 years. Presenting features included intracranial hypertension (7 cases), hypothalamic dysfunction (2), and memory dysfunction (3). Complete resection was possible in only 1 case, where the lesion was mainly exophytic; the remaining patients had either a partial resection or biopsy. On histological review, the tumors were confirmed as pilocytic astrocytoma (4 lesions), WHO Grade II astrocytoma (3), and ganglioglioma (1). Postoperatively, working and retrograde memory was normal for all patients, but the authors found a mild alteration in verbal episodic memory in 5 patients. Despite fatigability for 5 patients, academic achievement was normal for all but 2, both of whom had preoperative school difficulties. Additional treatment was required for 5 patients for tumor progression, with a median interval of 19 months from surgery. At a median follow-up duration of 4.9 years, all patients had stable disease.

Conclusions

In this series, forniceal gliomas were found to be low-grade gliomas. They are surgically challenging, and only exophytic lesions may be cured surgically. Due to the high rate of progression of residual disease, adjuvant therapy is recommended for infiltrative tumors, and it yielded excellent results.

Free access

Marc Zanello, Alexandre Roux, Gilles Zah-Bi, Bénédicte Trancart, Eduardo Parraga, Myriam Edjlali, Arnault Tauziede-Espariat, Xavier Sauvageon, Tarek Sharshar, Catherine Oppenheim, Pascale Varlet, Edouard Dezamis, and Johan Pallud

OBJECTIVE

Functional-based resection under awake conditions had been associated with a nonnegligible rate of intraoperative and postoperative epileptic seizures. The authors assessed the incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative epileptic seizures after functional-based resection under awake conditions.

METHODS

The authors prospectively assessed intraoperative and postoperative seizures (within 1 month) together with clinical, imaging, surgical, histopathological, and follow-up data for 202 consecutive diffuse glioma adult patients who underwent a functional-based resection under awake conditions.

RESULTS

Intraoperative seizures occurred in 3.5% of patients during cortical stimulation; all resolved without any procedure being discontinued. No predictor of intraoperative seizures was identified. Early postoperative seizures occurred in 7.9% of patients at a mean of 5.1 ± 2.9 days. They increased the duration of hospital stay (p = 0.018), did not impact the 6-month (median 95 vs 100, p = 0.740) or the 2-year (median 100 vs 100, p = 0.243) postoperative Karnofsky Performance Status score and did not impact the 6-month (100% vs 91.4%, p = 0.252) or the 2-year (91.7 vs 89.4%, p = 0.857) postoperative seizure control. The time to treatment of at least 3 months (adjusted OR [aOR] 4.76 [95% CI 1.38–16.36], p = 0.013), frontal lobe involvement (aOR 4.88 [95% CI 1.25–19.03], p = 0.023), current intensity for intraoperative mapping of at least 3 mA (aOR 4.11 [95% CI 1.17–14.49], p = 0.028), and supratotal resection (aOR 6.24 [95% CI 1.43–27.29], p = 0.015) were independently associated with early postoperative seizures.

CONCLUSIONS

Functional-based resection under awake conditions can be safely performed with a very low rate of intraoperative and early postoperative seizures and good 6-month and 2-year postoperative seizure outcomes. Intraoperatively, the use of the lowest current threshold producing reproducible responses is mandatory to reduce seizure occurrence intraoperatively and in the early postoperative period.

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Sophie Peeters, Mélanie Pagès, Guillaume Gauchotte, Catherine Miquel, Stéphanie Cartalat-Carel, Jean-Sébastien Guillamo, Laurent Capelle, Jean-Yves Delattre, Patrick Beauchesne, Marc Debouverie, Denys Fontaine, Emmanuel Jouanneau, Jean Stecken, Philippe Menei, Olivier De Witte, Philippe Colin, Didier Frappaz, Thierry Lesimple, Luc Bauchet, Manuel Lopes, Laurence Bozec, Elisabeth Moyal, Christophe Deroulers, Pascale Varlet, Marc Zanello, Fabrice Chretien, Catherine Oppenheim, Hugues Duffau, Luc Taillandier, and Johan Pallud

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to provide insight into the influence of gliomas on gestational outcomes, the impact of pregnancy on gliomas, and the identification of patients at risk.

METHODS

In this multiinstitutional retrospective study, the authors identified 52 pregnancies in 50 women diagnosed with a glioma.

RESULTS

For gliomas known prior to pregnancy (n = 24), we found the following: 1) An increase in the quantified imaging growth rates occurred during pregnancy in 87% of cases. 2) Clinical deterioration occurred in 38% of cases, with seizures alone resolving after delivery in 57.2% of cases. 3) Oncological treatments were immediately performed after delivery in 25% of cases. For gliomas diagnosed during pregnancy (n = 28), we demonstrated the following: 1) The tumor was discovered during the second and third trimesters in 29% and 54% of cases, respectively, with seizures being the presenting symptom in 68% of cases. 2) The quantified imaging growth rates did not significantly decrease after delivery and before oncological treatment. 3) Clinical deterioration resolved after delivery in 21.4% of cases. 4) Oncological treatments were immediately performed after delivery in 70% of cases. Gliomas with a high grade of malignancy, negative immunoexpression of alpha-internexin, or positive immunoexpression for p53 were more likely to be associated with tumor progression during pregnancy. Deliveries were all uneventful (cesarean section in 54.5% of cases and vaginal delivery in 45.5%), and the infants were developmentally normal.

CONCLUSIONS

When a woman harboring a glioma envisions a pregnancy, or when a glioma is discovered in a pregnant patient, the authors suggest informing her and her partner that pregnancy may impact the evolution of the glioma clinically and radiologically. They strongly advise a multidisciplinary approach to management.

■ CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE Type of question: association; study design: case series; evidence: Class IV.