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  • Author or Editor: Osahiko Tsuji x
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Masaya Nakamura, Osahiko Tsuji, Kanehiro Fujiyoshi, Kota Watanabe, Takashi Tsuji, Ken Ishii, Morio Matsumoto, Yoshiaki Toyama and Kazuhiro Chiba

Object

The optimal management of malignant astrocytomas remains controversial, and the prognosis of these lesions has been dismal regardless of the administered treatment. In this study the authors investigated the surgical outcomes of cordotomy in patients with thoracic malignant astrocytomas to determine the effectiveness of this procedure.

Methods

Cordotomy was performed in 5 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 2 with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed, and the associations of the resection level with survival and postoperative complications were retrospectively examined.

Results

Cordotomy was performed in a single stage in 2 patients with GBM and in 2 stages in 3 patients with GBM and 2 patients with AA. In the 2 patients with GBM, cordotomy was performed 2 and 3 weeks after a partial tumor resection. In the 2 patients with AA, the initial treatment consisted of partial tumor resection and subtotal resection combined with radiotherapy, and rostral tumor growth and progressive paralysis necessitated cordotomy 2 and 28 months later. One patient with a secondary GBM underwent cordotomy; the GBM developed 1 year after subtotal resection and radiotherapy for a WHO Grade II astrocytoma. Four patients died 4, 5, 24, and 42 months after the initial operation due to CSF dissemination, and 3 patients (2 with GBM and 1 with AA) remain alive (16, 39, and 71 months). No metastasis to any other organs was noted.

Conclusions

One-stage cordotomy should be indicated for patients with thoracic GBM or AA presenting with complete paraplegia preoperatively. In patients with thoracic GBM, even if paralysis is incomplete, cordotomy should be performed before the tumor disseminates through the CSF. Radical resection should be attempted in patients with AA and incomplete paralysis. If the tumor persists, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are indicated, and cordotomy should be reserved for lesions growing progressively after such second-line treatments.

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Masaya Nakamura, Kanehiro Fujiyoshi, Osahiko Tsuji, Tsunehiko Konomi, Naobumi Hosogane, Kota Watanabe, Takashi Tsuji, Ken Ishii, Suketaka Momoshima, Yoshiaki Toyama, Kazuhiro Chiba and Morio Matsumoto

Object

This study was conducted to determine whether postoperative changes in the fractional anisotropy (FA) value and diffusion tensor imaging of the cervical spinal cord can predict functional outcome for patients with cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM).

Methods

Twenty patients with CCM were treated by laminoplasty from 2008 to 2009. Both T2-weighted MRI and diffusion tensor imaging were performed before and after surgery. The FA values were analyzed and fiber tracking was performed. The fiber tract (FT) ratio was calculated according to the following formula: (number of fibers at the compressed level)/(number of fibers at the C-2 level) × 100%. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scoring system for cervical myelopathy was used to determine pre- and postoperative neurological status of the patients, and the Hirabayashi method was used to calculate the recovery rate.

Results

There was no significant difference in recovery rates between patients with and those without intramedullary high signal intensity on preoperative T2-weighted images. Substantial differences in FA value among spinal cord, bone, and CSF made it difficult to obtain a precise FA value for the compressed spinal cord. There was a significant correlation between the preoperative FT ratio and the recovery rate (p = 0.0006). A poor outcome (recovery rate < 40%) could be anticipated for CCM patients with preoperative FT ratios below 60%.

Conclusions

The preoperative FT ratio correlated significantly with the recovery rates in CCM patients. Preoperative diffusion tensor tractography can be a new prognostic predictor for neurological recovery in CCM patients after laminoplasty.

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Narihito Nagoshi, Osahiko Tsuji, Daisuke Nakashima, Ayano Takeuchi, Kaori Kameyama, Eijiro Okada, Nobuyuki Fujita, Mitsuru Yagi, Morio Matsumoto, Masaya Nakamura and Kota Watanabe

OBJECTIVE

Intramedullary cavernous hemangioma (CH) is a rare vascular lesion that is mainly characterized by the sudden onset of hemorrhage in young, asymptomatic patients, who then experience serious neurological deterioration. Despite the severity of this condition, the therapeutic approach and timing of intervention for CH remain matters of debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of CH patients before and after surgery and to identify prognostic indicators that affect neurological function in these patients.

METHODS

This single-center retrospective study included 66 patients who were treated for intramedullary CH. Among them, 57 underwent surgery and 9 patients received conservative treatment. The authors collected demographic, symptomology, imaging, neurological, and surgical data. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the prognostic indicators for neurological function.

RESULTS

When comparing patients with stable and unstable gait prior to surgery, patients with unstable gait had a higher frequency of hemorrhagic episodes (52.4% vs 19.4%, p = 0.010), as assessed by the modified McCormick Scale. The lesion was significantly smaller in patients who underwent conservative treatment compared with surgery (2.5 ± 1.5 mm vs 5.9 ± 4.1 mm, respectively; p = 0.024). Overall, the patients experienced significant neurological recovery after surgery, but a worse preoperative neurological status was identified as an indicator affecting surgical outcomes by multivariate analysis (OR 10.77, 95% CI 2.88–40.36, p < 0.001). In addition, a larger lesion size was significantly associated with poor functional recovery in patients who had an unstable gait prior to surgery (8.6 ± 4.5 mm vs 3.5 ± 1.6 mm, p = 0.011).

CONCLUSIONS

Once a hemorrhage occurs, surgical intervention should be considered to avoid recurrence of the bleeding and further neurological injury. In contrast, if the patients with larger lesion presented with worse preoperative functional status, surgical intervention could have a risk for aggravating the functional deficiencies by damaging the thinning cord parenchyma. Conservative treatment may be selected if the lesion is small, but regular neurological examination by MRI is needed for assessment of a change in lesion size and for detection of functional deterioration.