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Benjamin J. Ditty, Nidal B. Omar, Paul M. Foreman, Daxa M. Patel, Patrick R. Pritchard and Mamerhi O. Okor

OBJECT

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), as defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13 or higher, is a common problem in the United States and worldwide, estimated to affect more than 1 million patients yearly. When associated with intracranial hemorrhage, it is a common reason for neurosurgical consultation and transfer to tertiary care centers. The authors set out to investigate the clinical implications of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and/or intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) associated with mTBI in hopes of standardization of mTBI clinical care and optimization of resource allocation.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of 500 consecutively treated patients with mTBI and SAH and/or IPH admitted to a Level I trauma center in Alabama between May 2003 and May 2013. They performed a review of medical records to confirm the diagnosis, determine neurological condition at admission, and assess for episodes of neurological decline or brain injury–related complications including altered mental status, seizures, and hyponatremia.

RESULTS

Of the 500 patients for whom data were reviewed, 304 (60.8%) were male and 196 (39.2%) were female. Average age was 46.3 years. Overall, 63 patients (12.6%) had isolated IPH, 411 (82.2%) had isolated SAH, and 26 (5.2%) had radiographic evidence of both IPH and SAH. One hundred forty-five patients (29%) were transferred an average distance of 64.5 miles. The authors identified no patients who experienced neurological worsening during their hospital course. Two patients experienced hyponatremia that required treatment with sodium supplementation.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with the constellation of SAH and/or IPH and mTBI do not require neurosurgical consultation, and these findings should not be used as the sole criteria to justify transfer to tertiary referral centers.

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Benjamin J. Ditty, Nidal B. Omar, Paul M. Foreman, Joseph H. Miller, Kimberly P. Kicielinski, Winfield S. Fisher III and Mark R. Harrigan

OBJECTIVE

Patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) commonly present with seizure. Seizure outcomes in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are poorly defined. A case series of patients with cerebral AVMs treated with SRS is presented to evaluate long-term seizure outcome.

METHODS

A retrospective review of the medical record was performed, identifying 204 consecutive patients with AVMs treated with SRS between January 1991 and June 2012. Clinical and radiographic data were evaluated. Seizure outcome was measured using the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale. Mean duration of follow-up was 37.1 months (SD 38.3 months) with a minimum follow-up period of 1 month.

RESULTS

Of the 204 patients with cerebral AVMs treated with SRS, 78 patients (38.2%) presented with seizures and 49 of those patients were treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Following SRS, 63 (80.8%) of the 78 patients who had had seizures prior to SRS were seizure-free at a mean follow-up time of 37.2 months (SD 41.3 months). Of the 49 patients who had been treated with AEDs, 17 were still taking AEDs at last follow-up. Of the 126 patients who did not present with seizures prior to treatment with SRS, only 5 patients (4.0%) had seizures in the post-SRS period. There was no significant correlation between post-SRS seizure status and patient demographic features, comorbidities, AVM characteristics, history of operative intervention, pre- or posttreatment hemorrhage, or radiographic degree of AVM resolution.

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of cerebral AVMs is effective at providing long-term control of seizures. A substantial number of patients who were treated with SRS were not only seizure free at their last follow-up, but had been successfully weaned from antiepileptic medications.

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Travis J. Atchley, Galal A. Elsayed, Blake Sowers, Harrison C. Walker, Gustavo Chagoya, Matthew C. Davis, Joshua D. Bernstock, Nidal B. Omar, Daxa M. Patel and Barton L. Guthrie

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of seizures following deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode implantation and to evaluate factors associated with postoperative seizures.

METHODS

The authors performed a single-center retrospective case-control study. The outcome of interest was seizure associated with DBS implantation. Univariate analyses were performed using the Student t-test for parametric continuous outcomes. The authors used the Kruskal-Wallis test or Wilcoxon rank-sum test for nonparametric continuous outcomes, chi-square statistics for categorical outcomes, and multivariate logistic regression for binomial variables.

RESULTS

A total of 814 DBS electrode implantations were performed in 645 patients (478 [58.7%] in men and 520 [63.9%] in patients with Parkinson’s disease). In total, 22 (3.4%) patients who had undergone 23 (2.8%) placements experienced seizure. Of the 23 DBS implantation–related seizures, 21 were new-onset seizures (3.3% of 645 patients) and 2 were recurrence or worsening of a prior seizure disorder. Among the 23 cases with postimplantation-related seizure, epilepsy developed in 4 (17.4%) postoperatively; the risk of DBS-associated epilepsy was 0.50% per DBS electrode placement and 0.63% per patient. Nine (39.1%) implantation-related seizures had associated postoperative radiographic abnormalities. Multivariate analyses suggested that age at surgery conferred a modest increased risk for postoperative seizures (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.10). Sex, primary diagnosis, electrode location and sidedness, and the number of trajectories were not significantly associated with seizures after DBS surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Seizures associated with DBS electrode placement are uncommon, typically occur early within the postoperative period, and seldom lead to epilepsy. This study suggests that patient characteristics, such as age, may play a greater role than perioperative variables in determining seizure risk. Multiinstitutional studies may help better define and mitigate the risk of seizures after DBS surgery.