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Julius Griauzde, Joseph J. Gemmete, Aditya S. Pandey and Neeraj Chaudhary

OBJECT

A CSF leak can be difficult to locate in patients who present with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). The purpose of this case series was to describe the authors’ experience with intrathecal preservative-free normal saline challenge coupled with contrast-enhanced MR myelography (CEMRM), which was used to provoke and detect a CSF leakage site in patients with SIH.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of the records of patients who underwent preservative-free normal saline challenge followed by intrathecal gadolinium (Gd) contrast infusion and MR myelography from 2010 to 2012.

RESULTS

The records survey identified 5 patients who underwent 6 procedures. Intrathecal preservative-free normal saline challenge followed by CEMRM identified a CSF leak during 5 of the 6 procedures. Previous CT myelograms were available from 4 patients, which did not reveal a leakage site. A CT myelogram of 1 patient showed a single leak, but the authors’ saline challenge-CEMRM technique identified multiple additional leakage sites. Three patients exhibited transient postprocedural symptoms related to the saline infusion, but no long-term or permanent adverse effects related to the procedure were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Instillation of preservative-free normal saline into the thecal sac followed by intrathecal Gd infusion is a safe technique that may increase the detection of a CSF leak on MR myelography images in patients with SIH.

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Julius Griauzde, Vijay M. Ravindra, Neeraj Chaudhary, Joseph J. Gemmete, Marcus D. Mazur, Christopher D. Roark, William T. Couldwell, Min S. Park, Philipp Taussky and Aditya S. Pandey

OBJECTIVE

Flow-diverting devices have been used for the treatment of complex intracranial vascular pathology with success, but the role of these devices in treating iatrogenic intracranial vascular injuries has yet to be clearly defined. Here, the authors report their bi-institutional experience with the use of the Pipeline embolization device (PED) for the treatment of iatrogenic intracranial vascular injuries.

METHODS

The authors reviewed a retrospective cohort of patients with iatrogenic injuries to the intracranial vasculature that were treated with the PED between 2012 and 2016. Data collection included demographic data, indications for treatment, number and sizes of PEDs used, and immediate and follow-up angiographic and clinical outcomes.

RESULTS

Four patients with a mean age of 47.5 years (range 18–63 years) underwent PED placement for iatrogenic vessel injuries. In 3 patients, the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) was injured during transnasal tumor resection. In 1 patient, a basilar apex injury occurred during endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Three patients had a pseudoaneurysm as a result of vessel injury, and 1 patient had frank ICA laceration and extravasation. All 3 pseudoaneurysms were successfully treated with PED deployment. The ICA laceration was refractory to PED placement, and the vessel was subsequently occluded endovascularly. All 4 patients had a good clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1).

CONCLUSIONS

The use of the PED is feasible in the management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms of the intracranial vasculature. In cases of frank vessel perforation, an alternative strategy such as covered stent placement should be considered. Endovascular or surgical vessel occlusion remains the definitive treatment in cases of refractory hemorrhage.

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Osama N. Kashlan, Thomas J. Wilson, Neeraj Chaudhary, Joseph J. Gemmete, William R. Stetler Jr., N. Reed Dunnick, B. Gregory Thompson and Aditya S. Pandey

Object

As medical costs continue to rise during a time of increasing medical resource utilization, both hospitals and physicians must attempt to limit superfluous health care expenses. Neurointerventional treatment has been shown to be costly, but it is often the best treatment available for certain neuropathologies. The authors studied the effects of 3 policy changes designed to limit the costs of performing neurointerventional procedures at the University of Michigan.

Methods

The authors retrospectively analyzed the costs of performing neurointerventional procedures during the 6-month periods before and after the implementation of 3 cost-saving policies: 1) the use of an alternative, more economical contrast agent, 2) standardization of coil prices through negotiation with industry representatives to receive economies of scale, and 3) institution of a feedback method to show practitioners the costs of unused products per patient procedure. The costs during the 6-month time intervals before and after implementation were also compared with costs during the most recent 6-month time period.

Results

The policy requiring use of a more economical contrast agent led to a decrease in the cost of contrast usage of $42.79 per procedure for the first 6 months after implementation, and $137.09 per procedure for the most current 6-month period, resulting in an estimated total savings of $62,924.31 for the most recent 6-month period. The standardized coil pricing system led to savings of $159.21 per coil after the policy change, and $188.07 per coil in the most recent 6-month period. This yielded total estimated savings of $76,732.56 during the most recent 6-month period. The feedback system for unused items decreased the cost of wasted products by approximately $44.36 per procedure in the 6 months directly after the policy change and by $48.20 per procedure in the most recent 6-month period, leading to total estimated savings of $22,123.80 during the most recent 6-month period. According to extrapolation over a 1-year period, the 3 policy changes decreased costs by an estimated $323,561.34.

Conclusions

Simple cost-saving policies can lead to substantial reductions in costs of neurointerventional procedures while maintaining high levels of quality and growth of services.

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Luis E. Savastano, Neeraj Chaudhary, Joseph J. Gemmete, Hugh J. L. Garton, Cormac O. Maher and Aditya S. Pandey

Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare and challenging to treat. Achieving efficacy and durability of aneurysmal occlusion while maintaining parent vessel patency requires innovative treatment strategies, especially in cases in which aneurysmal location or morphology pose substantial morbidity associated with microsurgical treatment. In the last 3 decades, endovascular treatments have had a remarkable evolution and are currently considered safe and effective therapeutic options for cerebral aneurysms. While endovascular techniques are well described in the English literature, the endovascular management of pediatric aneurysms continues to pose a challenge. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 9-month-old infant who presented with a 1-day history of acute-onset left-sided hemiparesis and left facial droop. Imaging revealed a large symptomatic saccular middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Treatment included successful stent-assisted aneurysm coiling. At follow-up, the patient continued to fare well and MR angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the aneurysm dome. This case features the youngest patient in the English literature to harbor an intracranial aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coiling. Based on this experience, endovascular intervention with vascular reconstruction can be safe and effective for the treatment of infants and could further improve prognosis; however, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

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Daniel Orringer, Darryl Lau, Sameer Khatri, Grettel J. Zamora-Berridi, Kathy Zhang, Chris Wu, Neeraj Chaudhary and Oren Sagher

Object

The extent of resection (EOR) is a known prognostic factor in patients with glioblastoma. However, gross-total resection (GTR) is not always achieved. Understanding the factors that prevent GTR is helpful in surgical planning and when counseling patients. The goal of this study was to identify demographic, tumor-related, and technical factors that influence EOR and to define the relationship between the surgeon's impression of EOR and radiographically determined EOR.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of the electronic medical records to identify all patients who underwent craniotomy for glioblastoma resection between 2006 and 2009 and who had both preoperative and postoperative MRI studies. Forty-six patients were identified and were included in the study. Image analysis software (FIJI) was used to perform volumetric analysis of tumor size and EOR based on preoperative and postoperative MRI. Using multivariate analysis, the authors assessed factors associated with EOR and residual tumor volume. Perception of resectability was described using bivariate statistics, and survival was described using the log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier curves.

Results

The EOR was less for tumors in eloquent areas (p = 0.014) and those touching ventricles (p = 0.031). Left parietal tumors had significantly greater residual volume (p = 0.042). The average EOR was 91.0% in this series. There was MRI-demonstrable residual tumor in 69.6% of cases (16 of 23) in which GTR was perceived by the surgeon. Expert reviewers agreed that GTR could be safely achieved in 37.0% of patients (17 of 46) in this series. Among patients with safely resectable tumors, radiographically complete resection was achieved in 23.5% of patients (4 of 17). An EOR greater than 90% was associated with a significantly greater 1-year survival (76.5%) than an EOR less than 90% (p = 0.005).

Conclusions

The authors' findings confirm that tumor location affects EOR and suggest that EOR may also be influenced by the surgeon's ability to judge the presence of residual tumor during surgery. The surgeon's ability to judge completeness of resection during surgery is commonly inaccurate. The authors' study confirms the impact of EOR on 1-year survival.

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Jonathan R. Sukovich, Charles A. Cain, Aditya S. Pandey, Neeraj Chaudhary, Sandra Camelo-Piragua, Steven P. Allen, Timothy L. Hall, John Snell, Zhiyuan Xu, Jonathan M. Cannata, Dejan Teofilovic, James A. Bertolina, Neal Kassell and Zhen Xu

OBJECTIVE

Histotripsy is an ultrasound-based treatment modality relying on the generation of targeted cavitation bubble clouds, which mechanically fractionate tissue. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the in vivo feasibility, including dosage requirements and safety, of generating well-confined destructive lesions within the porcine brain utilizing histotripsy technology.

METHODS

Following a craniectomy to open an acoustic window to the brain, histotripsy pulses were delivered to generate lesions in the porcine cortex. Large lesions with a major dimension of up to 1 cm were generated to demonstrate the efficacy of histotripsy lesioning in the brain. Gyrus-confined lesions were generated at different applied dosages and under ultrasound imaging guidance to ensure that they were accurately targeted and contained within individual gyri. Clinical evaluation as well as MRI and histological outcomes were assessed in the acute (≤ 6 hours) and subacute (≤ 72 hours) phases of recovery.

RESULTS

Histotripsy was able to generate lesions with a major dimension of up to 1 cm in the cortex. Histotripsy lesions were seen to be well demarcated with sharp boundaries between treated and untreated tissues, with histological evidence of injuries extending ≤ 200 µm from their boundaries in all cases. In animals with lesions confined to the gyrus, no major hemorrhage or other complications resulting from treatment were observed. At 72 hours, MRI revealed minimal to no edema and no radiographic evidence of inflammatory changes in the perilesional area. Histological evaluation revealed the histotripsy lesions to be similar to subacute infarcts.

CONCLUSIONS

Histotripsy can be used to generate sharply defined lesions of arbitrary shapes and sizes in the swine cortex. Lesions confined to within the gyri did not lead to significant hemorrhage or edema responses at the treatment site in the acute or subacute time intervals.