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Nathan A. Shlobin, Mark Sheldon, and Sandi Lam

OBJECTIVE

Informed consent has served as a main principle of medical ethics and laws in the United States. The 1986 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Code of Ethics implied medicolegal liability for the failure to obtain informed consent without providing practical guidance regarding the application of informed consent to individual patient encounters in a medicolegal environment. Here, the authors aimed to identify baseline patient recall after discussions with neurosurgeons and their capacity to provide informed consent, describe the effects of interventions to improve patient comprehension, and elucidate the role of informed consent in malpractice litigation in neurosurgery. Their findings may guide neurosurgeons in discussions to properly inform patients and reduce the risk of litigation.

METHODS

A systematic review was conducted to explore informed consent within neurosurgery and its application to medicolegal liability using the PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases. Titles and abstracts from articles identified in the search were read and selected for full-text review. Studies meeting prespecified inclusion criteria were reviewed in full and analyzed for study design, aim, population, interventions, and outcomes.

RESULTS

Of 1428 resultant articles, 21 were included in the review. Baseline patient recall was low, particularly for risks and alternatives of treatments, and even decreased over time. Cognitive impairment was noted as a factor limiting the ability to provide informed consent. Interventions incorporating a combination of modalities in informed consent discussions, a specialized consent form with points for neurosurgeons to check off upon discussion, interactive websites, question prompt lists, and illustrations were found to be effective in improving patient knowledge. Lack of informed consent was a common factor for malpractice litigation. Spine surgery was particularly prone to costly lawsuits. Payments were generally greater for plaintiff verdicts than for settlements.

CONCLUSIONS

The application of informed consent to patient encounters is an important facet of clinical practice. Neurosurgeons have a duty to provide patients with all pertinent information to allow them to make decisions about their care. The authors examined baseline patient comprehension and capacity, interventions to improve informed consent, and malpractice litigation; it appears that determining the proper capacity to provide informed consent and considering informed consent as a process that depends on the setting are important. There is room to improve the informed consent process centered on baseline patient health literacy and understanding as well as clear communication using multiple modalities.

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Nathan A. Shlobin, Melissa A. LoPresti, Rebecca Y. Du, and Sandi Lam

OBJECTIVE

Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common congenital neurological defects, resulting in mortality, morbidity, and impaired quality of life for patients and caregivers. While public health interventions that increase folate consumption among women who are or plan to become pregnant are shown to reduce folate-sensitive NTDs, public health policy reflecting the scientific evidence lags behind. The authors aimed to identify the types of policies applied, associated outcomes, and impact of folate fortification and supplementation on NTDs worldwide. By identifying effective legislation, the authors aim to focus advocacy efforts to more broadly effect change, reducing the burden of NTDs in neurosurgery.

METHODS

A systematic review was conducted exploring folate fortification and supplementation policies using the PubMed and Scopus databases. Titles and abstracts from articles identified were read and selected for full-text review. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were reviewed in full and analyzed for study design, aim, population, interventions, and outcomes.

RESULTS

Of 1637 resultant articles, 54 were included. Mandatory folate fortification was effective at reducing folate-sensitive NTDs. Mandatory fortification also decreased hospitalization rates and deaths after discharge and increased 1st-year survival for infants with NTDs. Recommended folate supplementation also resulted in decreased NTDs; however, issues with compliance and adherence were a concern and impacted effectiveness. Folate fortification and/or supplementation resulted in decreased NTD prevalence, although more change was attributed to fortification. Dual policies may hold the most promise. Furthermore, reductions in NTDs were associated with significant cost savings over time.

CONCLUSIONS

Both mandatory folate fortification and recommended supplementation policies were found to effectively decrease folate-sensitive NTD rates when applied. A comprehensive approach incorporating mandatory folate fortification, appropriate folate supplementation, and improved infrastructure and access to prenatal care may lead to decreased NTDs worldwide. This approach should be context-specific, emphasize education, and account for regional access to healthcare and social determinants of health. With wide implications for NTDs, associated health outcomes, quality of life of patients and caregivers, and economic impacts, policy changes can drastically improve global NTD outcomes. As caretakers of children with NTDs, the authors as neurosurgeons advocate for a comprehensive policy, the engagement of stakeholders, and a broader global impact.

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Nathan A. Shlobin, Eytan Raz, Maksim Shapiro, Jeffrey R. Clark, Steven C. Hoffman, Ali Shaibani, Michael C. Hurley, Sameer A. Ansari, Babak S. Jahromi, Nader S. Dahdaleh, and Matthew B. Potts

OBJECTIVE

Spinal cord infarction due to interruption of the spinal vascular supply during anterior thoracolumbar surgery is a rare but devastating complication. Here, the authors sought to summarize the data on this complication in terms of its incidence, risk factors, and operative considerations. They also sought to summarize the relevant spinal vascular anatomy.

METHODS

They performed a systematic literature review of the PubMed, Scopus, and Embase databases to identify reports of spinal cord vascular injury related to anterior thoracolumbar spine procedures as well as operative adjuncts and considerations related to management of the segmental artery ligation during such anterior procedures. Titles and abstracts were screened, and studies meeting inclusion criteria were reviewed in full.

RESULTS

Of 1200 articles identified on the initial screening, 16 met the inclusion criteria and consisted of 2 prospective cohort studies, 10 retrospective cohort studies, and 4 case reports. Four studies reported on the incidence of spinal cord ischemia with anterior thoracolumbar surgery, which ranged from 0% to 0.75%. Eight studies presented patient-level data for 13 cases of spinal cord ischemia after anterior thoracolumbar spine surgery. Proposed risk factors for vasculogenic spinal injury with anterior thoracolumbar surgery included hyperkyphosis, prior spinal deformity surgery, combined anterior-posterior procedures, left-sided approaches, operating on the concavity side of a scoliotic curve, and intra- or postoperative hypotension. In addition, eight studies analyzed operative considerations to reduce spinal cord ischemic complications in anterior thoracolumbar surgery, including intraoperative neuromonitoring and preoperative spinal angiography.

CONCLUSIONS

While spinal cord infarction related to anterior thoracolumbar surgery is rare, it warrants proper consideration in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative periods. The spine surgeon must be aware of the relevant risk factors as well as the pre- and intraoperative adjuncts that can minimize these risks. Most importantly, an understanding of the relevant spinal vascular anatomy is critical to minimizing the risks associated with anterior thoracolumbar spine surgery.

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Nathan A Shlobin, Eytan Raz, Maksim Shapiro, Luke Moretti, Donald R Cantrell, Sandi K Lam, Michael C Hurley, Sameer A Ansari, Erez Nossek, Howard A Riina, Peter K Nelson, Babak S Jahromi, Ali Shaibani, and Matthew B Potts

OBJECTIVE

Cerebral aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare and optimal treatment strategies are not as well characterized as in adults. The Pipeline embolization device (PED) is an endoluminal flow diverter that is commonly used to treat aneurysms in adults, but experience with this device in children is limited. The authors sought to further characterize PED use and outcomes in this specific population by performing both a systematic review of patient-level data from studies reporting the use of the PED to treat pediatric aneurysms and a retrospective review of their experience.

METHODS

A systematic review of the PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases was performed to identify studies reporting the use of the PED in pediatric patients (age ≤ 18 years). Disaggregated data regarding demographics, aneurysm characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were collected. Retrospective data from the authors’ two institutions were also included.

RESULTS

Thirty studies comprising patient-level data on 43 pediatric patients with 47 aneurysms were identified. An additional 9 patients with 9 aneurysms were included from the authors' institutions for a total of 52 patients with 56 aneurysms. The mean patient age was 11.1 years. Presentations included aneurysm rupture (17.3%) and symptomatic mass effect (23.1%). Aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation in 55.4% of cases, and 73.2% were described as nonsaccular. Imaging follow-up was available for 89.3% with a mean follow-up of 13.3 months. Aneurysm occlusion was reported in 75%, with 1 case each (1.8%) demonstrating significant in-stent stenosis and parent vessel occlusion. Clinical follow-up was reported in 90.4% with a mean follow-up of 14.7 months. Good functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score of 0–1 or Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 5) were reported in 65.4% of the total population. Two major complications were reported, including 1 death.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite substantial differences in aneurysm location and type between published pediatric and adult patient populations treated with the PED, the use of the PED in the pediatric population appears to be safe. While the short-term effectiveness is also similar to that of adults, additional studies are needed to further characterize the long-term outcomes and better define the use of this device in pediatric patients.