Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Natasha Ironside x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Natasha Ironside, Thomas J. Buell, Andrew M. Southerland, Fernando D. Testai, Daniel Woo, Bradford B. Worrall and for the ERICH Investigators

OBJECTIVE

The utility of ICP monitoring and its benefit with respect to outcomes after ICH is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) outcomes in patients who underwent intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring to those who were managed by care-guided imaging and/or clinical examination alone.

METHODS

This was a retrospective analysis of data from the Ethnic/Racial variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ERICH) study between 2010 and 2015. ICH patients who underwent ICP monitoring were propensity-score matched, in a 1:1 ratio, to those who did not undergo ICP monitoring. The primary outcome was 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, hyperosmolar therapy use, ICH evacuation, length of hospital stay, and 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score, excellent outcome (mRS score 0–1), good outcome (mRS score 0–2), Barthel Index, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL; measured by EQ-5D and EQ-5D visual analog scale [VAS] scores). A secondary analysis for patients without intraventricular hemorrhage was performed.

RESULTS

The ICP and no ICP monitoring cohorts comprised 566 and 2434 patients, respectively. The matched cohorts comprised 420 patients each. The 90-day and in-hospital mortality rates were similar between the matched cohorts. Shift analysis of 90-day mRS favored no ICP monitoring (p < 0.001). The rates of excellent (p < 0.001) and good (p < 0.001) outcome, Barthel Index (p < 0.001), EQ-5D score (p = 0.026), and EQ-5D VAS score (p = 0.004) at 90 days were lower in the matched ICP monitoring cohort. Rates of mannitol use (p < 0.001), hypertonic saline use (p < 0.001), ICH evacuation (p < 0.001), and infection (p = 0.001) were higher, and length of hospital stay (p < 0.001) was longer in the matched ICP monitoring cohort. In the secondary analysis, the matched cohorts comprised 111 patients each. ICP monitoring had a lower rate of 90-day mortality (p = 0.041). Shift analysis of 90-day mRS, Barthel Index, and HRQoL metrics were comparable between the matched cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings of this study do not support the routine utilization of ICP monitoring in patients with ICH.

Restricted access

Ching-Jen Chen, Thomas J. Buell, Daniel M. S. Raper, Min S. Park, M. Yashar Kalani, Natasha Ironside, Robert F. James and Dale Ding

Restricted access

Natasha Ironside, Brandon Christophe, Samuel Bruce, Amanda M. Carpenter, Trae Robison, Nina Yoh, Serge Cremers, Donald Landry, Hans-Peter Frey, Ching-Jen Chen, Brian L. Hoh, Louis J. Kim, Jan Claassen and Edward Sander Connolly Jr.

OBJECTIVE

Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a significant contributor to poor outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The neurotoxin 3-aminopropanal (3-AP) is upregulated in cerebral ischemia. This phase II clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of tiopronin in reducing CSF 3-AP levels in patients with aSAH.

METHODS

In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial, 60 patients were assigned to receive tiopronin or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. Treatment was commenced within 96 hours after aSAH onset, administered at a dose of 3 g daily, and continued until 14 days after aSAH or hospital discharge, whichever occurred earlier. The primary efficacy outcome was the CSF 3-AP level at 7 ± 1 days after aSAH.

RESULTS

Of the 60 enrolled patients, 29 (97%) and 27 (93%) in the tiopronin and placebo arms, respectively, received more than one dose of the study drug or placebo. At post-aSAH day 7 ± 1, CSF samples were available in 41% (n = 12/29) and 48% (n = 13/27) of patients in the tiopronin and placebo arms, respectively. No difference in CSF 3-AP levels at post-aSAH day 7 ± 1 was observed between the study arms (11 ± 12 nmol/mL vs 13 ± 18 nmol/mL; p = 0.766). Prespecified adverse events led to early treatment cessation for 4 patients in the tiopronin arm and 2 in the placebo arm.

CONCLUSIONS

The power of this study was affected by missing data. Therefore, the authors could not establish or refute an effect of tiopronin on CSF 3-AP levels. Additional observational studies investigating the role of 3-AP as a biomarker for DCI may be warranted prior to its use as a molecular target in future clinical trials.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT01095731 (ClinicalTrials.gov)