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Narihito Nagoshi, Osahiko Tsuji, Daisuke Nakashima, Ayano Takeuchi, Kaori Kameyama, Eijiro Okada, Nobuyuki Fujita, Mitsuru Yagi, Morio Matsumoto, Masaya Nakamura, and Kota Watanabe

OBJECTIVE

Intramedullary cavernous hemangioma (CH) is a rare vascular lesion that is mainly characterized by the sudden onset of hemorrhage in young, asymptomatic patients, who then experience serious neurological deterioration. Despite the severity of this condition, the therapeutic approach and timing of intervention for CH remain matters of debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of CH patients before and after surgery and to identify prognostic indicators that affect neurological function in these patients.

METHODS

This single-center retrospective study included 66 patients who were treated for intramedullary CH. Among them, 57 underwent surgery and 9 patients received conservative treatment. The authors collected demographic, symptomology, imaging, neurological, and surgical data. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the prognostic indicators for neurological function.

RESULTS

When comparing patients with stable and unstable gait prior to surgery, patients with unstable gait had a higher frequency of hemorrhagic episodes (52.4% vs 19.4%, p = 0.010), as assessed by the modified McCormick Scale. The lesion was significantly smaller in patients who underwent conservative treatment compared with surgery (2.5 ± 1.5 mm vs 5.9 ± 4.1 mm, respectively; p = 0.024). Overall, the patients experienced significant neurological recovery after surgery, but a worse preoperative neurological status was identified as an indicator affecting surgical outcomes by multivariate analysis (OR 10.77, 95% CI 2.88–40.36, p < 0.001). In addition, a larger lesion size was significantly associated with poor functional recovery in patients who had an unstable gait prior to surgery (8.6 ± 4.5 mm vs 3.5 ± 1.6 mm, p = 0.011).

CONCLUSIONS

Once a hemorrhage occurs, surgical intervention should be considered to avoid recurrence of the bleeding and further neurological injury. In contrast, if the patients with larger lesion presented with worse preoperative functional status, surgical intervention could have a risk for aggravating the functional deficiencies by damaging the thinning cord parenchyma. Conservative treatment may be selected if the lesion is small, but regular neurological examination by MRI is needed for assessment of a change in lesion size and for detection of functional deterioration.

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Masahiro Ozaki, Nobuyuki Fujita, Azusa Miyamoto, Satoshi Suzuki, Osahiko Tsuji, Narihito Nagoshi, Eijiro Okada, Mitsuru Yagi, Takashi Tsuji, Masaya Nakamura, Morio Matsumoto, Hitoshi Kono, and Kota Watanabe

OBJECTIVE

Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) and knee osteoarthritis (KOA), both of which are age-related degenerative diseases, are independently correlated with increased pain and dysfunction of the lower extremities. However, there have been few studies that investigated whether LSS patients with KOA exhibit poor clinical recovery following lumbar spinal surgery. The aim of this study was to elucidate the surgical outcomes of lumbar spinal surgery for LSS patients with KOA using multiple health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters.

METHODS

A total of 865 consecutive patients who underwent posterior lumbar spinal surgery for LSS were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline characteristics, radiographic parameters, perioperative factors, and multiple HRQOL parameters were analyzed preoperatively and at 1-year follow-up. HRQOL items included the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). The effectiveness of surgical treatment was assessed using the JOABPEQ. The treatment was regarded as effective when it resulted in an increase in postoperative JOABPEQ score by ≥ 20 points compared with preoperative score or achievement of a postoperative score of ≥ 90 points in those with a preoperative score of < 90 points.

RESULTS

A total of 32 LSS patients with KOA were identified, and 128 age- and sex-matched LSS patients without KOA were selected as controls. In both groups, all HRQOL parameters markedly improved at the 1-year follow-up. On the SF-36, the postoperative mean score for the role physical domain was significantly lower in the KOA group than in the control group (p = 0.034). The treatment was significantly less “effective” in the social life domain of JOABPEQ in the KOA group than in the control group (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

The surgical outcomes of LSS patients with KOA are favorable, although poorer than those of LSS patients without KOA, particularly in terms of social life and activities. These results indicate that LSS patients with KOA experience difficulty in routine work or ordinary activities due to knee pain or restricted knee ROM even after lumbar spinal surgery. Hence, preoperative KOA status warrants consideration when planning lumbar spinal surgery and estimating surgical outcomes of LSS.

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Satoshi Nori, Akio Iwanami, Akimasa Yasuda, Narihito Nagoshi, Nobuyuki Fujita, Tomohiro Hikata, Mitsuru Yagi, Takashi Tsuji, Kota Watanabe, Suketaka Momoshima, Morio Matsumoto, Masaya Nakamura, and Ken Ishii

OBJECTIVE

A number of studies have reported that surgery for cervical intramedullary tumors via the posterior approach can result in postoperative sagittal malalignment of the cervical spine; however, the risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in cervical spinal alignment after surgery for cervical intramedullary tumors in adults and to elucidate the risk factors for cervical spinal sagittal misalignment.

METHODS

Data for the period from April 2001 to December 2011 for all adults who had undergone surgery for cervical intramedullary spinal cord tumors at a single institution were retrospectively analyzed to determine the postoperative changes in cervical spine alignment. Patients younger than 20 years of age and those who required postoperative radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to tumor location: upper tumor (U) group, in which the central region of the tumor was above the C-5 level; and lower tumor (L) group, in which the central region of the tumor was at or below the C-5 level. Changes in alignment of the cervical spine were measured on plain lateral radiographs. Data on atrophy of the deep extensor muscles (DEMs), tumor location, detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process, the C2–7 angle before surgery, patient age at surgery, tumor histology, patient sex, tumor size, and number of laminae affected were reviewed for each patient, and the correlation of each of these factors with cervical spinal malalignment was evaluated using statistical analysis.

RESULTS

The 54 adults eligible for analysis had a mean age of 49.1 years. Ependymoma was the most common cervical intramedullary tumor (63.0%) in this series. In the tumor location U group, the kyphotic angle of the C2–7 spinal segments increased after surgery (−5.8° ± 2.8°). In contrast, in the L group, the C2–7 lordotic angle increased after surgery (6.4° ± 2.6°). In the univariate analysis, atrophy of the DEMs, detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process, and an upper cervical location of the tumor were identified as factors significantly correlated with the development of cervical spinal kyphosis after surgery. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed the following as risk factors for kyphotic change of the cervical spine after surgery: 1) atrophy of the DEMs after surgery (β = −0.54, p < 0.01), and 2) detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process (β = −0.37, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Atrophy of the DEMs after surgery and detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process are directly related to the risk of cervical spinal kyphosis after surgery for cervical intramedullary tumors in adults. Therefore, preservation of the DEMs, especially those attached to the C-2 spinous process, is important for the prevention of kyphotic malalignment of the cervical spine after surgery for intramedullary tumors.

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Sanjeev Ariyandath Sreenivasan, Kanwaljeet Garg, Manmohan Singh, and Poodipedi Sarat Chandra

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Jun Jae Shin, Hyeongseok Jeon, Jong Joo Lee, Hyung Cheol Kim, Tae Woo Kim, Sung Bae An, Dong Ah Shin, Seong Yi, Keung-Nyun Kim, Do-Heum Yoon, Narihito Nagoshi, Kota Watanabe, Masaya Nakamura, Morio Matsumoto, Nan Li, Sai Ma, Da He, Wei Tian, Kenny Yat Hong Kwan, Kenneth Man Chee Cheung, K. Daniel Riew, Daniel J. Hoh, Yoon Ha, and the Asia Pacific Spine Study Group (APSSG)

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this retrospective multicenter study was to compare prognostic factors for neurological recovery in patients undergoing surgery for cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) based on their presenting mild, moderate, or severe myelopathy.

METHODS

The study included 372 consecutive patients with OPLL who underwent surgery for cervical myelopathy between 2006 and 2016 in East Asian countries with a high OPLL prevalence. Baseline and postoperative clinical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) myelopathy score and recovery ratio. Radiographic assessment included occupying ratio, cervical range of motion, and sagittal alignment parameters. Patient myelopathy was classified as mild, moderate, or severe based on the preoperative JOA score. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify patient and surgical factors associated with neurological recovery stratified by baseline myelopathy severity.

RESULTS

The mean follow-up period was 45.4 months (range 25–140 months). The mean preoperative and postoperative JOA scores and recovery ratios for the total cohort were 11.7 ± 3.0, 14.5 ± 2.7, and 55.2% ± 39.3%, respectively. In patients with mild myelopathy, only age and diabetes correlated with recovery. In patients with moderate to severe myelopathy, older age and preoperative increased signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging were significantly correlated with a lower likelihood of recovery, while female sex and anterior decompression with fusion (ADF) were associated with better recovery.

CONCLUSIONS

Various patient and surgical factors are correlated with likelihood of neurological recovery after surgical treatment for cervical OPLL, depending on the severity of presenting myelopathy. Older age, male sex, intramedullary high signal intensity, and posterior decompression are associated with less myelopathy improvement in patients with worse baseline function. Therefore, myelopathy-specific preoperative counseling regarding prognosis for postoperative long-term neurological improvement should include consideration of these individual and surgical factors.