Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Mostafa El Khashab x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Mostafa El Khashab

Restricted access

Farideh Nejat and Mostafa El Khashab

Restricted access

Mostafa El Khashab, Samuel T. Rhee, Sean D. Pierce, Yasmin El Khashab, Farideh Nejat, and Arno Fried

Adams-Oliver syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that includes congenital scalp and skull defects, variable degrees of terminal transverse limb anomalies, and cardiac malformations. Cutis aplasia occurring in 75% of patients is a potentially life-threatening condition. Large skin defects that cannot be closed primarily present a management dilemma, and may require skin grafting or flaps, or a combination of both operative and conservative modalities. The authors' experience in management of huge scalp and bone defects with the Integra Dermal Regeneration Template and regular dressing changes showed good scalp repair and no serious complications attributed to this approach.

Restricted access

Farideh Nejat and Mostafa El Khashab

Full access

Shima Shahjouei, Sara Hanaei, Farideh Nejat, Maryam Monajemzadeh, and Mostafa El Khashab

Intradural sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT) is a rare entity that has been reported in only a few cases previously. The authors present the case of a 2-week-old, otherwise healthy neonate with a mass in the buttock. The imaging findings and the high level of serum alpha-fetoprotein were highly suggestive of SCT. On operation the authors found intradural extension of the teratoma. The lesion was managed successfully without any remaining sequelae. The authors briefly review the currently proposed etiology regarding teratoma formation and the intradural extension of SCT.

Restricted access

Farideh Nejat and Mostafa El Khashab

Restricted access

Farideh Nejat, Zohreh Habibi, and Mostafa El Khashab

Full access

Sara Hanaei, Farideh Nejat, Abolghasem Mortazavi, Zohreh Habibi, Arash Esmaeili, and Mostafa El Khashab

Lipomyelomeningocele, a congenital spine defect, is presented as skin-covered lipomatous tissue that attaches to the cord in different ways according to its subtypes. Unlike other types of neural tube defects, the exact cause of this birth defect has not been confirmed yet, but it is proposed to be a multifactorial disease with involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. The authors describe identical twins with lipomyelomeningocele of the same subtype and location without any familial history of similar abnormality. Therefore, the same genetic and/or environmental risk factors could have played a part in their condition.

Restricted access

Farideh Nejat, Soheil Naderi, and Mostafa El Khashab