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  • Author or Editor: Mohamed A. R. Soliman x
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Mohamed A. R. Soliman and Ahmed Ali

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to compare the radiological and clinical results of bilateral interlaminar canal decompression and classic laminectomy in lumbar canal stenosis (LCS).

METHODS

Two hundred eighteen patients with LCS were randomized to surgical treatment with classic laminectomy (group 1) or bilateral interlaminar canal decompression (group 2). Low-back and leg pain were evaluated according to the visual analog scale (VAS) both preoperatively and postoperatively. Disability was evaluated according to the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) preoperatively and at 1 month, 1 year, and 3 years postoperatively. Neurogenic claudication was evaluated using the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. The two treatment groups were compared in terms of neurogenic claudication, estimated blood loss (EBL), and intra- and postoperative complications.

RESULTS

Postoperative low-back and leg pain declined as compared to the preoperative pain. Both groups had significant improvement in VAS, ODI, and ZCQ scores, and the improvements in ODI and back pain VAS scores were significantly better in group 2. The average EBL was 140 ml in group 2 compared to 260 ml in group 1. Nine patients in the laminectomy group developed postoperative instability requiring fusion compared to only 4 cases in the interlaminar group (p = 0.15). Complications frequency did not show any statistical significance between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Bilateral interlaminar decompression is an effective method that provides sufficient canal decompression with decreased instability in cases of LCS and increases patient comfort in the postoperative period.

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Ghada Waheed, Mohamed A. R. Soliman, Ahmed M. Ali and Mohamed H. Aly

OBJECTIVE

Spontaneous spondylodiscitis remains uncommon but is a serious complication of the vertebral column. Risk factors include diabetes, hemodialysis, intravenous drug abuse, and chronic steroid use, and pain is the most common presenting symptom. This study aims to review the literature and report on the incidence, management, and clinical outcome of spontaneous spondylodiscitis in 44 patients.

METHODS

This is a prospective study including 44 patients with spontaneous spondylodiscitis managed in the neurosurgery department of Cairo University Hospitals during the period between January 2012 and October 2017. All patients had a full clinical assessment, laboratory tests, radiological studies in the form of MRI with and without contrast, and a postoperative follow-up of up to 12 months.

RESULTS

Twelve cases underwent conservative treatment in the form of complete bed rest, intravenous antibiotics, and a spinal brace. Ten cases underwent surgical intervention in the form of laminectomy, debridement, and open biopsy. Twenty-two cases underwent laminectomy and surgical stabilization with fusion. There were 15 cases of tuberculous spondylodiscitis, 6 cases of brucellosis, 6 cases of pyogenic infection, and 17 cases in which no organism could be detected.

CONCLUSIONS

Once the primary diagnosis is confirmed, early and adequately prolonged antibiotic therapy is recommended for spontaneous spondylodiscitis. Some cases can be successfully treated with conservative treatment alone, whereas surgery may be needed in other cases such as severe destruction of endplates, spinal abscess formation, mechanical instability, neurological deficits, and severe pain that have failed to respond to conservative treatment.

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Nasser M. F. El-Ghandour, Mohamed A. R. Soliman, Ahmed A. M. Ezzat, Amr Mohsen and Mostafa Zein-Elabedin

OBJECTIVE

The safety and efficacy of anterior and posterior decompression surgery in degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) have not been validated in any prospective randomized trial.

METHODS

In this first prospective randomized trial, the patients who had symptoms or signs of DCM were randomly assigned to undergo either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion or posterior laminectomy with or without fusion. The primary outcome measures were the change in the visual analog scale (VAS) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Nurick myelopathy grade 1 year after surgery. The secondary outcome measures were intraoperative and postoperative complications, hospital stay, and Odom’s criteria. The follow-up period was at least 1 year.

RESULTS

A total of 68 patients (mean age 53 ± 8.3 years, 72.3% men) underwent prospective randomization. There was a significantly better outcome in the NDI and VAS scores in the anterior group at 1 year (p < 0.05). Nurick myelopathy grading showed nonsignificant improvement using the posterior approach group (p = 0.79). The mean operative duration was significantly longer in the anterior group (p < 0.001). No significant difference in postoperative complications was found, except postoperative dysphagia was significantly higher in the anterior group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in postoperative patient satisfaction (Odom’s criteria) (p = 0.52). The mean hospital stay was significantly longer in the posterior group (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Among patients with multilevel DCM, the anterior approach was significantly better regarding postoperative pain, NDI, and hospital stay, while the posterior approach was significantly better in terms of postoperative dysphagia and operative duration.