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Atsuhiro Nakagawa, Miki Fujimura, Tatsuhiko Arafune, Ichiro Sakuma and Teiji Tominaga

Object

Surgical revascularization for moyamoya disease prevents cerebral ischemic attacks by improving cerebral blood flow (CBF). Symptomatic cerebral hyperperfusion is a potential complication of this procedure, but its treatment is contradictory to that for ischemia. Because intraoperative techniques to detect hyperperfusion are still lacking, the authors performed intraoperative infrared monitoring in moyamoya disease using a novel infrared imaging system.

Methods

During superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery anastomosis in 25 patients (26 hemispheres) with moyamoya disease, the authors monitored the brain surface temperature intraoperatively with the IRIS-V infrared imaging system. The average gradation value change (indicating temperature change) was calculated using commercial software. Magnetic resonance imaging, MR angiography, and N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine SPECT studies were performed routinely before and within 10 days after surgery.

Results

Patency of bypass, detailed local hemodynamics, and changes in cortical surface temperature around the anastomosis site were well recognized by the IRIS-V infrared imaging system in all cases. In the present study, 10 patients suffered transient neurological symptoms accompanied by an increase in CBF around the anastomosis site, recognized as symptomatic hyperperfusion. The increase in temperature was significantly higher in these patients. Intensive blood pressure control was undertaken, and free-radical scavengers were administered. No patient in the present study suffered a permanent neurological deficit.

Conclusions

Although the present method does not directly monitor surface CBF, temperature rise around the anastomosis site during surgery might be an indicator of postoperative hyperperfusion. Prospective evaluation with a larger number of patients is necessary to validate this technique.

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Toshiaki Hayashi, Reizo Shirane, Miki Fujimura and Teiji Tominaga

Object

Young patients with moyamoya disease frequently exhibit extensive cerebral infarction at the time of initial presentation, and even in the early postoperative period. To investigate clinical characteristics in the early postoperative period, the authors prospectively analyzed findings of MR imaging, MR angiography, and SPECT before and after surgery. The authors focused in particular on how postoperative neurological deterioration occurred.

Methods

Between August 2005 and June 2009, 22 patients younger than 18 years of age with moyamoya disease were treated at Miyagi Children's Hospital. The mean patient age (± SD) was 8.58 ± 4.55 years (range 2–17 years). Superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery bypass and indirect bypass of encephalosynangiosis between the brain surface and the temporal muscle, galea, and dura mater were performed in 35 hemispheres. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR angiography were performed before surgery, at 7 days postoperatively, and 3–6 months after surgery. A 123I-isopropyl iodoamphetamine SPECT scan was also obtained pre- and postoperatively.

Results

During the postoperative period, neurological deterioration was observed after 15 operations (10 cases of motor paresis, 1 of aphasia, and 4 of sensory disturbance) in 13 patients. All symptoms had resolved by the time of discharge, except in 2 patients who suffered cerebral infarction. All patients exhibited disappearance (94.3%) or reduction (5.7%) of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) during the follow-up period. Perioperative studies revealed 2 different types of radiological findings, focal uptake decrease on SPECT indicative of cerebral ischemia due to dynamic change in cerebral hemodynamics caused by bypass flow, the so-called watershed shift, and perioperative edematous lesions on MR imaging due to cerebral hyperperfusion. The frequent occurrence of preoperative TIAs was significantly associated with watershed shift, whereas preoperative MR imaging findings and preoperative SPECT findings were not. Age at operation was the only factor significantly associated with postoperative hyperperfusion.

Conclusions

In young patients, moyamoya disease exhibits rapid progression, resulting in poor clinical outcome. The risk of postoperative neurological deterioration in very young moyamoya patients with frequent TIAs should be noted. The findings in this study showed that direct bypass is not completely safe in patients with moyamoya disease because it causes dynamic change in postoperative cerebral hemodynamics.

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Yosuke Akamatsu, Hiroaki Shimizu, Atsushi Saito, Miki Fujimura and Teiji Tominaga

Object

In the intraluminal suture model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the mouse, disturbance of blood flow from the internal carotid artery to the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) may affect the size of the infarction. In this study, PCA involvement in the model was investigated and modified for consistent MCAO without involving the PCA territory.

Methods

Thirty-seven C57Bl/6 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the length of coating over the tip of the suture (1, 2, 3, or 4 mm) and subjected to transient MCAO for 2 hours. Real-time topographical cerebral blood flow was monitored over both hemispheres by laser speckle flowmetry. After 24 hours of reperfusion, the infarct territories and volumes were evaluated.

Results

The 1- and 2-mm coating groups showed all lesions in the MCA territory. In the 3- and 4-mm coating groups, 62.5% and 75% of mice, respectively, showed lesions in both the MCA and the PCA territories and other lesions in the MCA territory. Mice in the 1- and 2-mm coating groups had significantly smaller infarct volumes than the 3- and 4-mm groups. Laser speckle flowmetry was useful to distinguish whether the PCA territory would undergo infarction.

Conclusions

Small changes in the coating length of the intraluminal suture may be critical, and 1–2 mm of coating appeared to be optimal to produce consistent MCAO without involving the PCA territory. Laser speckle flowmetry could predict the territory of infarction and improve the consistency of the infarct size.

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Takashi Inoue, Hiroaki Shimizu, Miki Fujimura, Atsushi Saito and Teiji Tominaga

Object

In this paper, the authors' goals were to clarify the characteristics of growing unruptured cerebral aneurysms detected by serial MR angiography and to establish the recommended follow-up interval.

Methods

A total of 1002 patients with 1325 unruptured cerebral aneurysms were retrospectively identified. These patients had undergone follow-up evaluation at least twice. Aneurysm growth was defined as an increase in maximum aneurysm diameter by 1.5 times or the appearance of a bleb.

Results

Aneurysm growth was observed in 18 patients during the period of this study (1.8%/person-year). The annual rupture risk after growth was 18.5%/person-year. The proportion of females among patients with growing aneurysms was significantly larger than those without growing aneurysms (p = 0.0281). The aneurysm wall was reddish, thin, and fragile on intraoperative findings. Frequent follow-up examination is recommended to detect aneurysm growth before rupture.

Conclusions

Despite the relatively short period, the annual rupture risk of growing unruptured cerebral aneurysms detected by MR angiography was not as low as previously reported. Surgical or endovascular treatment can be considered if aneurysm growth is detected during the follow-up period.

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Miki Fujimura, Naoto Kimura, Masayuki Ezura, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Hiroshi Uenohara and Teiji Tominaga

The development of a de novo arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in patients with moyamoya disease is extremely rare. A 14-year-old girl developed an AVM in the right occipital lobe during the 4-year postoperative period following successful bilateral revascularization surgeries. She suffered a transient ischemic attack with hemodynamic compromise of the bilateral hemispheres at the age of 10 years. Results of an initial examination by 1.5-T MRI and MR angiography satisfied the diagnostic criteria of moyamoya disease but failed to detect any vascular malformation. Bilateral direct and indirect revascularization surgeries in the anterior circulation relieved her symptoms, and she underwent MRI and MR angiography follow-up every year after surgery. Serial T2-weighted MRI revealed the gradual appearance of flow voids in the right occipital lobe during the follow-up period. Magnetic resonance angiography ultimately indicated the development of an AVM 4 years after these surgeries when catheter angiography confirmed the diagnosis of an AVM in the right occipital lobe. The AVM remained asymptomatic, and the patient remained free of cerebrovascular events during the time she was observed by the authors. Acquired AVM in moyamoya disease is extremely rare, with only 3 pediatric cases including the present case being reported in the literature. The development of a de novo AVM in a postoperative patient with moyamoya disease appears to be unique, and this case may provide insight into the dynamic pathology of AVMs.

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Kaoruko Kato, Miki Fujimura, Atsuhiro Nakagawa, Atsushi Saito, Tomohiro Ohki, Kazuyoshi Takayama and Teiji Tominaga

Object

Shock waves have been experimentally applied to various neurosurgical treatments including fragmentation of cerebral emboli, perforation of cyst walls or tissue, and delivery of drugs into cells. Nevertheless, the application of shock waves to clinical neurosurgery remains challenging because the threshold for shock wave–induced brain injury has not been determined. The authors investigated the pressure-dependent effect of shock waves on histological changes of rat brain, focusing especially on apoptosis.

Methods

Adult male rats were exposed to a single shot of shock waves (produced by silver azide explosion) at over-pressures of 1 or 10 MPa after craniotomy. Histological changes were evaluated sequentially by H & E staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL). The expression of active caspase-3 and the effect of the nonselective caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK) were examined to evaluate the contribution of a caspase-dependent pathway to shock wave–induced brain injury.

High-overpressure (> 10 MPa) shock wave exposure resulted in contusional hemorrhage associated with a significant increase in TUNEL-positive neurons exhibiting chromatin condensation, nuclear segmentation, and apoptotic bodies. The maximum increase was seen at 24 hours after shock wave application. Low-overpressure (1 MPa) shock wave exposure resulted in spindle-shaped changes in neurons and elongation of nuclei without marked neuronal injury. The administration of Z-VAD-FMK significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells observed 24 hours after high-overpressure shock wave exposure (p < 0.01). A significant increase in the cytosolic expression of active caspase-3 was evident 24 hours after high-overpressure shock wave application; this increase was prevented by Z-VAD-FMK administration. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that TUNEL-positive cells were exclusively neurons.

Conclusions

The threshold for shock wave–induced brain injury is speculated to be under 1 MPa, a level that is lower than the threshold for other organs. High-overpressure shock wave exposure results in brain injury, including neuronal apoptosis mediated by a caspase-dependent pathway. This is the first report in which the pressure-dependent effect of shock wave on the histological characteristics of brain tissue is demonstrated.

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Tomohiro Kawaguchi, Atsuhiro Nakagawa, Toshiki Endo, Miki Fujimura, Yukihiko Sonoda and Teiji Tominaga

OBJECT

Neuroendoscopic surgery allows minimally invasive surgery, but lacks effective methods to control bleeding. Water jet dissection with continuous flow has been used in liver and kidney surgery since the 1980s, and is effective for tissue manipulation with vascular preservation, but involves some potential risks, such as elevation of intracranial pressure during application in the ventricles. The authors previously reported the efficacy of the actuator-driven pulsed water jet device (ADPJ) to dissect soft tissue with vascular preservation in microscopic neurosurgery. This feasibility study investigated the use of the ADPJ to reduce the amount of water usage, leading to more safety with sustained efficacy.

METHODS

A small-diameter pulsed water jet device was developed for use with the flexible neuroendoscope. To identify the optimal conditions for the water jet, the flow rate, water pressure, and distance between the nozzle and target were analyzed in an in vitro study by using a gelatin brain phantom. A ventricle model was used to monitor the internal pressure and temperature. For ex vivo experiments the porcine brain was harvested and ventricle walls were exposed, and subsequently immersed into physiological saline. For in vivo experiments the cortex was microsurgically resected to make the small cortico-ventricle window, and then the endoscope was introduced to dissect ventricle walls.

RESULTS

In the in vitro experiments, water pressure was approximately 6.5 bar at 0.5 mm from the ADPJ nozzle and was maintained at 1 mm, but dropped rapidly toward 50% at 2 mm, and became 10% at 3.5 mm. The ADPJ required less water to achieve the same dissection depth compared with the continuous-flow water jet. With the ventricle model, the internal pressure and temperature were well controlled at the baseline, with open water drainage. These results indicated that the ADPJ can be safely applied within the ventricles. The ADPJ was introduced into a flexible endoscope and the ventricle walls were dissected in both the ex vivo and in vivo conditions. The ventricle wall was dissected without obscuring the view, and the vascular structures were anatomically preserved under direct application. Histological examination revealed that both the vessels on the ventricle wall and the fine vessels in the parenchyma were preserved.

CONCLUSIONS

The ADPJ can safely and effectively dissect the ventricle wall, with vascular preservation in immersed conditions. To achieve the optimal result of tissue dissection with minimal surgical risk, the ADPJ is a potential device for neuroendoscopic surgery of the ventricles.

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Atsushi Saito, Hiroaki Shimizu, Yusuke Doi, Tatsuhiro Ishida, Miki Fujimura, Takashi Inoue, Hiroshi Kiwada and Teiji Tominaga

Object

Targeted drug delivery with immunoliposomes has been applied to various in vivo animal models and is newly focused as a novel therapeutic target. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor–1 (LOX1) is a potent regulator of systemic atherosclerosis, and the authors focused on its effect on carotid plaques. The authors developed a LOX1-targeted liposomal rho-kinase inhibitor and examined the therapeutic effect on carotid intimal hypertrophy in rats.

Methods

LOX1-targeted rho-kinase inhibitor fasudil-containing liposomes, composed of hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol/PEG2000-DSPE, were prepared by conjugating anti-LOX1 antibodies on the surface and by remote loading of fasudil. Carotid intimal hypertrophy was induced by balloon injury, and the drugs were intravenously administered on Day 3 postinjury. The rats were divided into 4 groups: nontreatment, treatment with intravenous fasudil (2 mg), treatment with liposomal fasudil (2 mg), and treatment with LOX1-targeted liposomal fasudil (2 mg). The authors compared intimal hypertrophy, atherosclerotic factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression among groups.

Results

DiI–labeled LOX1-targeted liposomes were prominently observed in the lesions on Day 7 after the surgery. The intimal thickness was significantly reduced in the LOX1-targeted liposomal fasudil–treated group (mean 81.6 ± 13.9 μm) compared with the other groups (no treatment 105.4 ± 16.8 μm; fasudil treatment 102.4 ± 20.0 μm; and liposomal fasudil treatment 102.8 ± 22.2 μm; p = 0.046). Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression was also significantly reduced in the LOX1-targeted liposomal fasudil group.

Conclusions

Liposomes conjugated with anti-LOX1 antibody effectively reached carotid artery lesions, and liposomal rho-kinase significantly inhibited intimal hypertrophy. The new liposomal drug delivery system targeting LOX1 may become a therapeutic strategy for atherosclerotic diseases.

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Kenichi Sato, Toshiki Endo, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Miki Fujimura, Takashi Inoue, Hiroaki Shimizu and Teiji Tominaga

Object

Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) and perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVFs) are uncommonly associated in the craniocervical junction. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and angiographic characteristics of such concurrent lesions.

Methods

Authors reviewed 9 cases with a coexistent DAVF and PAVF at the craniocervical junction. Clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, intraoperative findings, and treatment outcomes were assessed.

Results

All patients (male/female ratio 5:4; mean age 66.3 years) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed that 8 patients had both a DAVF and PAVF on the same side, whereas 1 patient had 3 arteriovenous fistulas, 1 DAVF, and 1 PAVF on the right side and 1 DAVF on the left side. All of the fistulas shared dilated perimedullary veins (anterior spinal vein, 7 cases; anterolateral spinal vein, 2 cases) as a main drainage route. The shared drainage route was rostrally directed in 8 of 9 cases. Eight patients exhibited an arterial aneurysm on the distal side of the feeding arteries to the PAVF, and the aneurysm in each case was intraoperatively confirmed as a bleeding point. One patient had ruptured venous ectasia at the perimedullary fistulous point. All patients underwent direct surgery via a posterolateral approach. No recurrence was observed in the 4 patients who underwent postoperative angiography, and no rebleeding event was recorded among any of the 9 patients during the follow-up period (mean 38.4 months).

Conclusions

The similarity of the angioarchitecture and the close anatomical relationship between DAVF and PAVF at the craniocervical junction suggested that these lesions are pathogenetically linked. The pathophysiological mechanism and anatomical features of these lesions represent a unique vascular anomaly that should be recognized angiographically to plan a therapeutic strategy.

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Yasuo Nishijima, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Miki Fujimura, Yosuke Akamatsu, Hiroaki Shimizu and Teiji Tominaga

OBJECT

Numerous studies have attempted to reveal the pathophysiology of ischemic neuronal injury using a representative transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) model in rodents; however, most of them have used gerbil or rat models. Recent advances in transgene and gene-knockout technology have enabled the precise molecular mechanisms of ischemic brain injury to be investigated. Because the predominant species for the study of genetic mutations is the mouse, a representative mouse model of tGCI is of particular importance. However, simple mouse models of tGCI are less reproducible; therefore, a more complex process or longer duration of ischemia, which causes a high mortality rate, has been used in previous tGCI models in mice. In this study, the authors aimed to overcome these problems and attempted to produce consistent unilateral delayed hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in mice.

METHODS

C57BL/6 mice were subjected to short-term unilateral cerebral ischemia using a 4-mm silicone-coated intraluminal suture to obstruct the origin of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the PCA territory was measured using laser speckle flowmetry. The mice were randomly assigned to groups of different ischemic durations and histologically evaluated at different time points after ischemia. The survival rate and neurological score of the group that experienced 15 minutes of ischemia were also evaluated.

RESULTS

Consistent neuronal death was observed in the medial CA1 subregion 4 days after 15 minutes of ischemia in the group of mice with a reduction in rCBF of < 65% in the PCA territory during ischemia. Morphologically degenerated cells were mostly positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling and cleaved caspase 3 staining 4 days after ischemia. The survival rates of the mice 24 hours (n = 24), 4 days (n = 15), and 7 days (n = 7) after being subjected to 15 minutes of ischemia were 95.8%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, and the mice had slight motor deficits.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors established a model of delayed unilateral hippocampal neuronal death in C57BL/6 mice by inducing ischemia in the PCA territory using an intraluminal suture method and established inclusion criteria for PCAterritory rCBF monitored by laser speckle flowmetry. This model may be useful for investigating the precise molecular mechanisms of ischemic brain injury.