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Marlin Dustin Richardson, Nicholas O. Palmeri, Sarah A. Williams, Michelle R. Torok, Brent R. O’Neill, Michael H. Handler and Todd C. Hankinson

OBJECT

NSAIDs are effective perioperative analgesics. Many surgeons are reluctant to use NSAIDs perioperatively because of a theoretical increase in the risk for bleeding events. The authors assessed the effect of routine perioperative ketorolac use on intracranial hemorrhage in children undergoing a wide range of neurosurgical procedures.

METHODS

A retrospective single-institution analysis of 1451 neurosurgical cases was performed. Data included demographics, type of surgery, and perioperative ketorolac use. Outcomes included bleeding events requiring return to the operating room, bleeding seen on postoperative imaging, and the development of renal failure or gastrointestinal tract injury.

Variables associated with both the exposure and outcomes (p < 0.20) were evaluated as potential confounders for bleeding on postoperative imaging, and multivariable logistic regression was performed. Bivariable analysis was performed for bleeding events. Odds ratios and 95% CIs were estimated.

RESULTS

Of the 1451 patients, 955 received ketorolac. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated no significant association between clinically significant bleeding events (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.15–3.1) or radiographic hemorrhage (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.43–1.51) and the perioperative administration of ketorolac. Treatment with a medication that creates a known bleeding risk (OR 3.11; 95% CI 1.01–9.57), surgical procedure (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.11–4.94), and craniotomy/craniectomy (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.19–4.94) were associated with a significantly elevated risk for radiographically identified hemorrhage.

CONCLUSIONS

Short-term ketorolac therapy does not appear to be associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of bleeding documented on postoperative imaging in pediatric neurosurgical patients and may be considered as part of a perioperative analgesic regimen. Although no association was found between ketorolac and clinically significant bleeding events, a larger study needs to be conducted to control for confounding factors, because of the rarity of these events.

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Todd C. Hankinson, Roy W. R. Dudley, Michelle R. Torok, Mohana Rao Patibandla, Kathleen Dorris, Seerat Poonia, C. Corbett Wilkinson, Jennifer L. Bruny, Michael H. Handler and Arthur K. Liu

OBJECT

Thirty-day mortality is increasingly a reference metric regarding surgical outcomes. Recent data estimate a 30-day mortality rate of 1.4−2.7% after craniotomy for tumors in children. No detailed analysis of short-term mortality following a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure (e.g., resection or tissue biopsy) for tumor in the US pediatric population has been conducted.

METHODS

The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data sets identified patients ≤ 21 years who underwent a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure for primary intracranial tumor from 2004 to 2011. One- and two-month mortality was estimated. Standard statistical methods estimated associations between independent variables and mortality.

RESULTS

A total of 5533 patients met criteria for inclusion. Death occurred within the calendar month of surgery in 64 patients (1.16%) and by the conclusion of the calendar month following surgery in 95 patients (1.72%). Within the first calendar month, patients < 1 year of age (n = 318) had a risk of death of 5.66%, while those from 1 to 21 years (n = 5215) had a risk of 0.88% (p < 0.0001). By the end of the calendar month following surgery, patients < 1 year (n = 318) had a risk of death of 7.23%, while those from 1 to 21 years (n = 5215) had a risk of 1.38% (p < 0.0001). Children < 1 year at diagnosis were more likely to harbor a high-grade lesion than older children (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5–2.4).

CONCLUSIONS

In the SEER data sets, the risk of death within 30 days of a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure for a primary pediatric brain tumor is between 1.16% and 1.72%, consistent with contemporary data from European populations. The risk of mortality in infants is considerably higher, between 5.66% and 7.23%, and they harbor more aggressive lesions.

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Mohana Rao Patibandla, Thomas Ridder, Kathleen Dorris, Michelle R. Torok, Arthur K. Liu, Michael H. Handler, Nicholas V. Stence, Laura Z. Fenton and Todd C. Hankinson

OBJECT

Ganglioglioma (GG) is commonly recognized as a low-grade tumor located in the temporal lobe, often presenting with seizures. Most are amenable to complete resection and are associated with excellent oncological outcome. The authors encountered several GGs in various locations, which seem to have a less favorable clinical course than GGs in the temporal lobe.

METHODS

The authors performed a single-center retrospective review of all children with a histological diagnosis of GG who were treated at Children’s Hospital Colorado between 1997 and 2013. Each tumor was categorized by 2 pediatric neuroradiologists as typical or atypical based on preoperative MRI appearance. Typical lesions were cortically based, within a single cerebral lobe, well-circumscribed, and solid or mixed solid/cystic. The treatment and clinical course of each patient was analyzed.

RESULTS

Thirty-seven children were identified, with a median age at presentation of 8.2 years and median follow-up of 38.0 months. Eighteen tumors (48.6%) were typical and 19 (51.4%) were atypical. All typical lesions presented with seizures, whereas no atypical lesions did so. Sixteen (88.9%) typical lesions were located in the temporal lobe. In the atypical group, tumor location was variable, including 11 (57.9%) in the brainstem. Death during follow-up was statistically more common in the atypical group (31.6% vs 0%, p = 0.02). Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved for 15 of 16 typical tumors (93.8%), compared with 3 atypical tumors (15.8%, p < 0.0001). Presentation with seizure or non-brainstem location were each associated with survival (p = 0.02 and 0.004, respectively). The presence of mutation in BRAF exon 15 did not differ between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Pediatric GG with typical imaging features is associated with excellent rates of GTR and overall survival. Atypical GG is commonly encountered, less amenable to GTR, and associated with a worse outcome. This may relate to anatomical or biological characteristics and merits further investigation.