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Michael Y. Wang

Object

The treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD) remains a challenge for the spine surgeon. While minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has many favorable attributes that would be of great benefit for the ASD population, improvements in lordosis and sagittal balance have remained elusive in cases involving the MIS approach. This report describes the evolution of an MIS method for treating ASD with attention to sagittal correction.

Methods

Over an 18-month period 25 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis were treated surgically. The mean patient age was 72 years, and 68% of the population was female. Patients were treated with multilevel facet osteotomies and interbody fusion in which expandable cages (mean 3.2 levels) were placed and percutaneous screw fixation (mean 5.3 levels) was performed. Seven patients underwent supplemental percutaneous iliac fixation.

Results

All patients underwent MIS without conversion to a traditional open procedure. The mean operative time was 273 mins and the mean blood loss was 416 ml. There were no intraoperative complications. The Cobb angle over the scoliotic deformity improved from a mean of 29.2° to that of 9.0° (p < 0.001). Lumbar lordosis between L-1 and S-1 improved from a mean of 27.8° to one of 42.6° (p < 0.001). Sagittal vertical axis improved from 7.4 cm to 4.3 cm (p = 0.001). Numeric pain scale scores improved as well, an average of 3.3 and 4.2 for the leg and back, respectively. A mean improvement of 20.8 points on the Oswestry Disability Index was seen at 12 months. Complications included: two cases requiring hardware repositioning, one case of screw pullout, one asymptomatic pedicle screw breach, prolonged hospitalization from constipation, and one acute coronary syndrome developing 3 days after surgery without myocardial damage.

Conclusions

An expanding body of evidence suggests that sagittal balance remains a keystone for good outcomes after ASD surgery. Minimally invasive surgery that involves a combination of osteotomies, interbody height restoration, and advanced fixation techniques may achieve this goal in patients with less severe deformities. While feasibility will have to be proven with larger series and improved surgical methods, the present technique holds promise as a means of reducing the significant morbidity associated with surgery in the ASD population.

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Michael Y. Wang and Gerd Bordon

OBJECTIVE

Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is a powerful but high-risk surgical technique for destabilizing the spine for deformity correction in both the sagittal and coronal planes. Numerous reports have demonstrated the benefits of this technique for realigning the spine in a physiological posture; however, the open surgical technique is associated with a high complication rate. In this report the authors review data obtained in a series of patients who underwent PSO through a less invasive approach.

METHODS

Sixteen patients with severe coronal- and/or sagittal-plane deformities were treated in this series. Conservative measures had failed in all cases and patients had undergone a single-level PSO or extended PSO at L-2 or L-3. Fixation was accomplished using percutaneous instrumentation and interbody or facet joint fusions were used at the remaining levels. None of the procedures were aborted or converted to a traditional open procedure. Standard clinical and radiographic measures were used to assess patient outcomes.

RESULTS

Mean age was 68.8 years and mean follow-up duration was 17.7 months. An average of 7.6 levels were fused, and 50% of the patients had bilateral iliac screw fixation, with all constructs crossing both the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral junctions. Operative time averaged 356 ± 50 minutes and there was a mean blood loss of 843 ± 339 ml.

The leg visual analog scale score improved from a mean of 5.7 ± 2.7 to one of 1.3 ± 1.6, and the back visual analog scale score improved from a mean of 8.6 ± 1.3 to one of 2.4 ± 2.1. The Oswestry Disability Index score improved from a mean of 50.1 ± 14.4 to 16.4 ± 12.7, representing a mean reduction of 36.0 ± 16.9 points. The SF-36 physical component summary score changed from a mean of 43.4 ± 2.6 to one of 47.0 ± 4.3, and the SF-36 mental component summary score changed from a mean of 46.7 ± 3.6 to 46.30 ± 3.0.

Coronal alignment improved from a mean of 27.9 ± 43.6 mm to 16.0 ± 17.2 mm. The lumbar Cobb angle improved from a mean of 41.2° ± 18.4° to 15.4° ± 9.6°, and lumbar lordosis improved from 23.1° ± 15.9° to 48.6° ± 11.7°. Pelvic tilt improved from a mean of 33.7° ± 8.6° to 24.4° ± 6.5°, and the sagittal vertical axis improved from 102.4 ± 73.4 mm to 42.2 ± 39.9 mm. The final lumbar lordosis–pelvic incidence difference averaged 8.4° ± 12.1°. There were 4 patients who failed to achieve less than or equal to a 10° mismatch on this parameter. Ten of the 16 patients underwent delayed postoperative CT, and 8 of these had developed a solid arthrodesis at all levels treated. A total of 6 complications occurred in this series. There were no cases of symptomatic proximal junction kyphosis.

CONCLUSIONS

Advancements in minimally invasive technique have resulted in the ability to manage increasingly complex deformities with hybrid approaches. In this limited series, the authors describe the results of utilizing a tissue-sparing mini-open PSO to correct severe spinal deformities. This method was technically feasible in all cases with acceptable radiographic outcomes similar to open surgery. However, high complication rates associated with these deformity corrections remain problematic.

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Michael Y. Wang and Jay Grossman

OBJECTIVE

One of the principal goals of minimally invasive surgery has been to speed postoperative recovery. In this case series, the authors used an endoscopic technique for interbody fusion combined with percutaneous screw fixation to obviate the need for general anesthesia.

METHODS

The first 10 consecutive patients treated with a minimum of 1 year's follow-up were included in this series. The patients were all treated using endoscopic access through Kambin's triangle to allow for neural decompression, discectomy, endplate preparation, and interbody fusion. This was followed by percutaneous pedicle screw and connecting rod placement using liposomal bupivacaine for long-acting analgesia. No narcotics or regional anesthetics were used during surgery.

RESULTS

All patients underwent the procedure successfully without conversion to open surgery. The patients' average age was 62.2 ± 9.0 years (range 52–78 years). All patients had severe disc height collapse, and 60% had a Grade I spondylolisthesis. The mean operative time was 113.5 ± 6.3 minutes (range 105–120 minutes), and blood loss was 65 ± 38 ml (range 30–190 ml). The mean length of hospital stay was 1.4 ± 1.3 nights. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Comparison of preoperative and final clinical metrics demonstrated that the Oswestry Disability Index improved from 42 ± 11.8 to 13.3 ± 15.1; the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Summary improved from 47.6 ± 3.8 to 49.7 ± 5.4; the SF-36 Mental Component Summary decreased from 47 ± 3.9 to 46.7 ± 3.4; and the EQ-5D improved from 10.7 ± 9.5 to 14.2 ± 1.6. There were no cases of nonunion identified radiographically on follow-up imaging.

CONCLUSIONS

Endoscopic fusion under conscious sedation may represent a feasible alternative to traditional lumbar spine fusion in select patients. Larger clinical series are necessary to validate that clinical improvements are sustained and that arthrodesis rates are successful when compared with open surgery. This initial experience demonstrates the possible utility of this procedure.

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Michael Y. Wang and Spencer Block

As surgical techniques evolve, new intraoperative complications are prone to occur. With percutaneous spinal fixation, the control of implants and instruments can be a challenge when compared with open surgery, particularly if unintended instruments are retained or difficult to retrieve. In this report, the authors describe a case in which Jamshidi needle fragments broke within the vertebral body. Extraction of the fragments was accomplished using a small pedicle screw tap to first engage the retained metal and then to loosen the surrounding bone to allow retrieval and preservation of the anatomical structures needed to complete the intended operation. This technique may prove useful for the retrieval of deformable, cannulated metal pieces in minimally invasive surgery.

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Michael Y. Wang and Paul Khoueir

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Michael Y. Wang

Adult spinal deformities (ASD) pose a challenge for the spinal surgeon. Because the spine is often rigid, mobilization of the segments is critical for effective correction, particularly in the sagittal plane. While minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has many favorable attributes that would be of great benefit for the ASD population, improvements in lordosis and sagittal balance have remained problematic using MIS approaches, including MIS lateral methods. This video illustrates one method for achieving improvement of coronal and sagittal correction without the extensive exposure and soft tissue envelope disruption needed in open surgery, particularly for less severe deformities. By using multi-level TLIFs through a mini-open surgery, curves of less than 60° can be managed with minimal blood loss and within a reasonable surgical timeframe. While feasibility will have to be proven with larger series and improved surgical methods, this technique holds promise as a means of reducing the significant morbidity associated with surgery in the ASD population.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/I0rkDSAVas0.

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Joanna E. Gernsback and Michael Y. Wang

Vertebral augmentation with cement has become a common procedure for the treatment of compression fractures, leading to a growing population who have had this procedure and are now in need of another spinal surgery. This technical note reports an undescribed method for placing pedicle screws through a previously cemented level.

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Faiz U. Ahmad and Michael Y. Wang

Object

Over the past decade percutaneous pedicle screws have become popular for the minimally invasive treatment of spinal disorders. However, until the last 5 years the presence of a significant spinal deformity was regarded as a relative contraindication for percutaneous instrumentation. Recent advances in surgical technique and intraoperative technology have made percutaneous fixation in complex spinal pathologies more commonplace. The authors report their experience using a parsimonious method for uniplanar fluoroscopic targeting of pedicles in challenging cases.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients with adult spinal deformity who underwent percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation from 2008 to 2013. Cases were included if a spiral slice postoperative CT scan was obtained. All cases had a minimum of 10° of axial rotation and typically had additional accompanying anatomical abnormalities. Screws were assessed for any pedicle violations as well as any impingement of the surrounding facet joints.

Results

A total of 410 pedicle screws were placed in 36 patients with an average 6.4 levels of instrumentation per patient. The mean age was 67 years (range 44–86 years) and there were 25 females. Of the 410 screws, 29 (7.1%) had some medial or lateral pedicle violation. Of these, 15 (3.7%) were Grade 1, 6 (1.4%) were Grade 2, and 8 (2.0%) were Grade 3 violations. Of the Grade 3 violations, 2 each were at the L-4, L-5, and S-1 levels, and 1 each was at the T-10 and L-1 levels. Two of the patients had symptoms and both underwent screw repositioning, one during the same admission and the other in a delayed fashion. Both were at the L-5 and S-1 levels with anatomically highly medialized pedicles. There were no motor deficits, and both removals were for numbness. Of the 72 screws at the proximal end of the construct, there were 6 facet violations (8.3%). Four (5.6%) of these were Grade 1, 1 (1.4%) was Grade 2, and 1 (1.4%) was Grade 3.

Conclusions

The anteroposterior fluoroscopic technique can be effectively used by spinal surgeons to cannulate the pedicles in patients with rotational deformities. The complication rate in this challenging population is acceptable and is in accordance with the existing literature. However, caution should be used at L-5 and S-1 when the pedicle is narrow and highly medialized, rendering an indistinct medial wall on anteroposterior imaging.

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George M. Ghobrial and Michael Y. Wang

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Michael Y Wang and Allan D. O. Levi

Occipital neuralgia is a result of neuropathic pain transmission in the distribution of the greater occipital nerve. Because it is well anatomically localized, occipital neuralgia has been the focus of various surgical treatments. Ablation, decompression, and modulation of the C-2 nerve have all been described as effective treatments. The C-2 dorsal root ganglionectomy provides effective treatment for this disorder with a low incidence of unpleasant side effects. In this review the authors summarize the current treatment of occipital neuralgia.