Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 113 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael T. Lawton x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Rene O. Sanchez-Mejia and Michael T. Lawton

✓Distal aneurysms of basilar perforating and circumferential arteries are exceedingly rare. The authors encountered one patient with a distal basilar perforating artery aneurysm and two with aneurysms arising from circumferential branches of the basilar artery (BA). The diagnostic features, microsurgical treatment, and outcomes in these three patients are described. The first patient, a 27-year-old man, presented with an angiogram-negative subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and subsequent readmission for a new hemorrhage revealed a centrally thrombosed aneurysm arising from a basilar apex perforating artery. The second patient, a 68-year-old man, presented for follow-up evaluation 2 months after an angio-gram-negative SAH, and an aneurysm was identified on a circumferential artery originating from the BA trunk. The third patient, a 2-year-old boy, presented with blunt head trauma and a pseudoaneurysm arising from a basilar apex circumferential artery.

All three aneurysms were managed microsurgically with aneurysm trapping, via either an orbitozygomatic or an extended retrosigmoid approach. Occlusion of the distal perforating or circumferential artery was well tolerated in all cases, with no neurological sequelae resulting from surgery. Features common to all three aneurysms were dolichoectatic morphology, intraluminal thrombus, and SAH. These aneurysms may be difficult to diagnose given their small size and delayed filling on angiographic studies. Consequently, their presence in cases of angiogram-negative SAH may be underestimated. These aneurysms are not amenable to endovascular treatment, but excellent results can be obtained with microsurgical exposure and trapping.

Full access

Jason M. Davies and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

Treatment of cerebrovascular malformations has grown in complexity with the development of multimodal approaches, including microsurgery, endovascular treatments, and radiosurgery. In spite of this changing standard of care, the provision of care continues across a variety of settings. The authors sought to determine the risk of adverse outcome after treatment of patients with vascular malformations in the US. Patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics, including volume, were tested as potential outcome predictors.

METHODS

The authors examined data collected between 2000 and 2009 in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, assessing safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness. They performed multivariate analyses of trends in microsurgical, radiosurgical, and endovascular treatment by hospital and surgeon volume, using death, routine discharge percentage, length of stay (LOS), complications, and hospital charges as end points. They further computed the value of care, which was defined as the ratio of the functional outcome (routine discharge percentage) to cost of care to the payer (hospital charges).

RESULTS

The authors identified 8227 patients with vascular malformations who were treated at US hospitals. Hospitals and surgeons were classified by yearly case volume. Compared with low-volume hospitals (2 or fewer cases/year), high-volume hospitals (16 or more cases/year) had shorter LOS (3 vs 2 days, p = 0.005), higher total charges ($37,374 vs $19,986, p = 0.003), more frequent discharge to home (p < 0.001), and lower mortality rates (0.7% vs 1.16%, p = 0.010). High-volume surgeons (7 or more cases/year) likewise had superior outcomes compared with low-volume surgeons (1 or fewer cases/year), with shorter LOS (2 vs 3 days, p = 0.03), more frequent discharge to home (p < 0.001), and lower mortality rates (0.7% vs 1.10%, p = 0.005). Underlying these outcomes, the rates of intervention for surgery, angiography, embolization, and radiosurgery were likewise significantly different in high- versus low-volume practices.

Based on these results the authors modeled how outcomes might change if care were consolidated at designated centers of excellence (COEs), and found that on an annual basis, care at high-volume hospital COEs would result in 18.5 fewer deaths, 1252.1 fewer hospital days, 182.7 more discharges home without additional services, 48.5 fewer medical complications, and 117.4 fewer perioperative complications. Surgeon-level rates for high-volume COEs demonstrated an even larger benefit over current standards, with 27.4 fewer deaths, 10,713.7 fewer hospital days, a $51.6-million reduction in charges, 370.9 additional routine discharges, and reduced complications in all categories (27.8 fewer surgical, 198.0 fewer medical, and 32.1 fewer perioperative) compared with care at non-COEs.

CONCLUSIONS

For patients with vascular malformations who were treated in the US between 2000 and 2009, treatment performed at high-volume centers was associated with significantly lower morbidity and, for high-volume surgeons, with lower mortality rates. These data suggest that treatment by high-volume institutions and surgeons will yield superior outcomes and superior value. The authors therefore advocate the creation of care paradigms that triage patients to high-volume institutions and surgeons, which can serve as cerebrovascular COEs.

Restricted access

Ana Rodríguez-Hernández and Michael T. Lawton

Object

Surgical routes to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms are opened between the vagus (cranial nerve [CN] X), accessory (CN XI), and hypoglossal (CN XII) nerves for safe clipping, but these routes have not been systematically defined. The authors describe 3 anatomical triangles and their relationships with PICA aneurysms, routes for surgical clipping, outcomes, and angiographically demonstrated anatomy.

Methods

The vagoaccesory triangle is defined by CN X superiorly, CN XI laterally, and the medulla medially. It is divided by CN XII into the suprahypoglossal triangle (above CN XII) and the infrahypoglossal triangle (below CN XII). From a consecutive surgical series of 71 PICA aneurysms in 70 patients, 51 aneurysms were analyzed using intraoperative photographs.

Results

Forty-three PICA aneurysms were located inside the vagoaccessory triangle and 8 were outside. Of the aneurysms inside the vagoaccessory triangle, 22 (51%) were exposed through the suprahypoglossal triangle and 19 (44%) through the infrahypoglossal triangle; 2 were between triangles. The lesions were evenly distributed between the anterior medullary (16 aneurysms), lateral medullary (19 aneurysms), and tonsillomedullary zones (16 aneurysms). Neurological and CN morbidity linked to aneurysms in the suprahypoglossal triangle was similar to that associated with aneurysms in the infrahypoglossal triangle, but no morbidity was associated with PICA aneurysms outside the vagoaccessory triangle. A distal PICA origin on angiography localized the aneurysm to the suprahypoglossal triangle in 71% of patients, and distal PICA aneurysms were localized to the infrahypoglossal triangle or outside the vagoaccessory triangle in 78% of patients.

Conclusions

The anatomical triangles and zones clarify the borders of operative corridors to PICA aneurysms and define the depth of dissection through the CNs. Deep dissection to aneurysms in the anterior medullary zone traverses CNs X, XI, and XII, whereas shallow dissection to aneurysms in the lateral medullary zone traverses CNs X and XI. Posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms outside the vagoaccessory triangle are frequently distal and superficial to the lower CNs, and associated surgical morbidity is minimal. Angiography may preoperatively localize a PICA aneurysm's triangular anatomy based on the distal PICA origin or distal aneurysm location.

Restricted access

Zaman Mirzadeh, Nader Sanai and Michael T. Lawton

The authors introduce the azygos anterior cerebral artery (ACA) bypass as an option for revascularizing distal ACA territories, as part of a strategy to trap giant anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. In this procedure, the aneurysm is exposed with an orbitozygomatic-pterional craniotomy and distal ACA vessels are exposed with a bifrontal craniotomy. The uninvolved contralateral A2 segment of the ACA serves as a donor vessel for a short radial artery graft. The contralateral pericallosal artery (PcaA) and the callosomarginal artery (CmaA) are connected to the graft in the interhemispheric fissure using the double reimplantation technique. Three anastomoses create an azygos system supplying the entire ACA territory, enabling the surgeon to trap the aneurysm incompletely. Retrograde flow from the CmaA supplies the ipsilateral recurrent artery of Heubner, and the aneurysm lumen thromboses.

The azygos bypass was successfully performed to treat a 47-year-old woman with a giant, thrombotic ACoA aneurysm supplied by the A1 segment of the left ACA, with left PcaA and CmaA originating from the aneurysm base.

The authors conclude that the azygos ACA bypass is a novel option for revascularizing PcaA and CmaA, as part of the overall treatment of giant ACoA aneurysms.

Restricted access

Roberto C. Heros

Full access

Adib A. Abla and Michael T. Lawton

Object

The authors describe their experience with intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses for complex anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysms with giant size, dolichoectatic morphology, or intraluminal thrombus; they determine how others have addressed the limitations of ACA bypass; and they discuss clinical indications and microsurgical technique.

Methods

A consecutive, single-surgeon experience with ACA aneurysms and bypasses over a 16-year period was retrospectively reviewed. Bypasses for ACA aneurysms reported in the literature were also reviewed.

Results

Ten patients had aneurysms that were treated with ACA bypass as part of their surgical intervention. Four patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 3 patients with mass effect symptoms from giant aneurysms; 1 patient with bacterial endocarditis had a mycotic aneurysm, and 1 patient's meningioma resection was complicated by an iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm. One patient had his aneurysm discovered incidentally. There were 2 precommunicating aneurysms (A1 segment of the ACA), 5 communicating aneurysms (ACoA), and 3 postcommunicating (A2–A3 segments of the ACA). In situ bypasses were used in 4 patients (A3-A3 bypass), interposition bypasses in 4 patients, reimplantation in 1 patient (pericallosal artery-to-callosomarginal artery), and reanastomosis in 1 patient (pericallosal artery). Complete aneurysm obliteration was demonstrated in 8 patients, and bypass patency was demonstrated in 8 patients. One bypass thrombosed, but 4 years later. There were no operative deaths, and permanent neurological morbidity was observed in 2 patients. At last follow-up, 8 patients (80%) were improved or unchanged. In a review of the 29 relevant reports, the A3-A3 in situ bypass was used most commonly, extracranial (EC)–IC interpositional bypasses were the second most common, and reanastomosis and reimplantation were used the least.

Conclusions

Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms requiring bypass are rare and can be revascularized in a variety of ways. Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms, more than any other aneurysms, require a thorough survey of patient-specific anatomy and microsurgical options before deciding on an individualized management strategy. The authors' experience demonstrates a preference for IC-IC reconstruction, but EC-IC bypasses are reported frequently in the literature. The authors conclude that ACA bypass with indirect aneurysm occlusion is a good alternative to direct clip reconstruction for complex ACA aneurysms.

Free access

Adib A. Abla and Michael T. Lawton

Free access

Omar Choudhri and Michael T. Lawton

The middle tentorial incisural space, located lateral to the midbrain and medial to the temporal lobe, contains the ambient cistern through which courses the third, fourth, and fifth cranial nerves, posterior cerebral artery (PCA), superior cerebellar artery, and the choroidal arteries. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in this compartment are supplied by the thalamogeniculate and posterior temporal branches of the PCA, and drain into tributaries of the basal vein of Rosenthal. We present a case of an AVM in this middle tentorial incisural space that persisted after embolization and radiosurgery, and was microsurgically resected through a subtemporal approach. This case demonstrates the anatomy of the middle incisural space and technical aspects in microsurgical resection of these rare AVMs.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/V-dIWh8ys3E.

Restricted access

Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, Kurtis I. Auguste and Michael T. Lawton

Restricted access

Michael T. Lawton, Ronald Jacobowitz and Robert F. Spetzler

✓ To investigate the role of angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of dural arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), 40 rats underwent common carotid artery—external jugular vein (CCA-EJV) anastomosis, bipolar coagulation of the vein draining the transverse sinus, and sagittal sinus thrombosis to induce venous hypertension. Fifteen rats underwent a similar surgical procedure, but venous hypertension was not induced. The 55 rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups, each containing 10 rats, underwent induced venous hypertension. The other three groups, each containing five rats, did not undergo induced venous hypertension. After 1, 2, or 3 weeks, dura mater was obtained from one group of hypertensive rats and from one group of nonhypertensive rats and was assayed for angiogenic activity (rabbit cornea bioassay). The remaining group of 10 hypertensive rats was not assayed to determine if sampling affected dural AVM formation. Unlike rats without CCA-EJV anastomosis, rats with CCA-EJV anastomosis had significantly increased postoperative sagittal sinus pressures (p < 0.0001). Mean angiogenesis indices were significantly greater in rats with venous hypertension than in rats without venous hypertension (p = 0.004). Dural AVMs formed in 42% of the 55 rats and facial AVMs formed in 51%. Angiogenic activity correlated positively with venous hypertension (ρ = 0.74). Development of dural AVMs correlated positively with both venous hypertension (p = 0.0009) and angiogenic activity (p = 0.04). These data indicate that venous hypertension may induce angiogenic activity either directly or indirectly by decreasing cerebral perfusion and increasing ischemia, and that dural AVM formation may be the result of aberrant angiogenesis.