Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael H. Weber x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Michael K. Morgan, Ian H. Johnston, John M. Hallinan, and Neville C. Weber

✓ A series of 112 patients undergoing complete surgical resection of arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) of the brain between 1974 and 1990 were analyzed for complications and 12-month outcomes. The cohort consisted of 44 patients with small AVM's (< 2 cm in diameter), 43 patients with medium-sized AVM's (2 to 4 cm in diameter), and 25 patients with large AVM's (> 4 cm in diameter). There was a 3.6% series mortality rate and an 18% morbidity rate. One of the four deaths was caused by normal perfusion pressure breakthrough. Analysis of logistic regression found that the most important factor influencing the occurrence of complications in this series was AVM size (p = 0.005) and that the occurrence of complications (p < 0.001) and the neurological grade at the time of surgery (p < 0.004) both significantly contributed to the outcome at 12 months.

This study stresses the importance of defining complications in terms of rigid criteria when analyzing AVM series in order to allow for a correct evaluation of the risk:benefit ratio of surgery. Furthermore, it emphasizes the need for a separate analysis of the importance of complications upon outcome.

Full access

Michael H. Weber, Lojan Sivakumaran, Maryse Fortin, Alisson R. Teles, Jeff D. Golan, Carlo Santaguida, Peter Jarzem, and Thierry Pauyo

OBJECTIVE

The cost of spine management is rising. As diagnostic imaging accounts for approximately 10% of total patient care spending, there is interest in determining if economies could be made with regard to the routine consultation of radiology for image interpretation. In the context of spine trauma, both the spine surgeon and the radiologist interpret perioperative imaging. Authors of the present study investigated the impact of radiologist interpretation of perioperative imaging from patients with traumatic single-level thoracolumbar fractures given that spine surgeons are expected to be comfortable interpreting pathologies of the musculoskeletal system.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective review of all patients presenting with a single-level thoracolumbar fracture treated at the McGill University Health Centre in the period from January 2003 to December 2010. The time between image capture and radiologist interpretation as well as the number of extraskeletal and/or incidental findings was extracted from the radiology reports on all perioperative images including radiographic, fluoroscopic, and CT images. The cost of interpretation was obtained from the provincial health insurance entity of Quebec.

RESULTS

Eighty-two patients met the study inclusion criteria. Radiologists took a median of 1 day (IQR 0–5.5 days) to interpret preoperative radiographs. Intraoperative fluoroscopic images and postoperative radiographs were read by the radiologist a median of 19 days (IQR 4–56.75 days) and 34 days (IQR 1–137.5 days) after capture, respectively (p < 0.05). Preoperative radiologist dictations reported extraskeletal and/or incidental findings for 8.1% of radiographs; there were no intraoperative or postoperative extraskeletal findings beyond those previously reported on the preoperative radiographs. Radiologists took a median of 1 day (IQR 0–1 day) to read both preoperative and postoperative CT scans; extraskeletal and/or incidental findings were present in 46.2% of preoperative reports and 4.5% of postoperative reports. There were no intraoperative or postoperative radiological findings that provoked reoperation. A total of 66 intraoperative fluoroscopy images and 225 postoperative radiographs were read for a cost of $1399.20 and $1867.50 (Canadian dollars), respectively, for radiologist interpretation. This cost amounted to 40.3% of all perioperative image interpretation spending.

CONCLUSIONS

In the management of single-level thoracolumbar fractures, radiologists add information to the diagnostic picture when interpreting preoperative radiographs and perioperative CT scans; however, the interpretation of intraoperative fluoroscopic images and postoperative radiographs comes with significant delay, does not add additional information, and represents an area of potential cost and professional-resource reduction.

Full access

Alisson R. Teles, Michael Paci, Gabriel Gutman, Fahad H. Abduljabbar, Jean A. Ouellet, Michael H. Weber, and Jeff D. Golan

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical and surgical risk factors for screw-related facet joint violation at the superior level in lumbar fusion.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective review of a consecutive series of posterior lumbar instrumented fusions performed by a single surgeon. Inclusion criteria were primary lumbar fusion of 1 or 2 levels for degenerative disorders. The following variables were analyzed as possible risk factors: surgical technique (percutaneous vs open screw placement), depth of surgical field, degree of anterior slippage of the superior level, pedicle and facet angle, and facet degeneration of the superior level. Postoperative CT scans were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers. Axial, sagittal, and coronal views were reviewed. Pedicle screws were graded as intra-articular if they clearly interposed between the superior and inferior facet joints of the superior level. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with this complication.

RESULTS

One hundred thirty-one patients were included. Interobserver reliability for facet joint violation assessment was high (κ = 0.789). The incidence of superior facet joint violation was 12.59% per top-level screw (33 of 262 proximal screws). The rate of facet violation was 28.0% in the percutaneous technique group (14 of 50 patients) and 12.3% in the open surgery group (10 of 81 patients) (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.09–4.21; p = 0.024). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent predictors of facet violation were percutaneous screw placement (adjusted OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.42–7.73; p = 0.006), right-side pedicle screw (adjusted OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.29–7.63; p = 0.011), and facet angle > 45° (adjusted OR 10.95, 95% CI 4.64–25.84; p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

The incidence of facet joint violation was higher in percutaneous minimally invasive than in open technique for posterior lumbar spine surgery. Also, coronal orientation of the facet joint is a significant risk factor independent of the surgical technique.

Restricted access

Oliver G. S. Ayling, Y. Raja Rampersaud, Charlotte Dandurand, Po Hsiang (Shawn) Yuan, Tamir Ailon, Nicolas Dea, Greg McIntosh, Sean D. Christie, Edward Abraham, Christopher S. Bailey, Michael G. Johnson, Jacques Bouchard, Michael H. Weber, Jerome Paquet, Joel Finkelstein, Alexandra Stratton, Hamilton Hall, Neil Manson, Kenneth Thomas, and Charles G. Fisher

OBJECTIVE

Treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases has been shown to be clinically effective with open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (O-TLIF) or minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Despite this, a substantial proportion of patients do not meet minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in patient-reported outcomes (PROs). The objectives of this study were to compare the proportions of patients who did not meet MCIDs after O-TLIF and MIS-TLIF and to determine potential clinical factors associated with failure to achieve MCID.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent O-TLIF or MIS-TLIF for lumbar degenerative disorders and had been prospectively enrolled in the Canadian Spine Outcomes and Research Network. The authors analyzed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, physical and mental component summary scores of SF-12, numeric rating scale (NRS) scores for leg and back pain, and EQ-5D scores of the patients in each group who did not meet the MCID of ODI at 2 years postoperatively.

RESULTS

In this study, 38.8% (137 of 353) of patients in the O-TLIF cohort and 41.8% (51 of 122) of patients in the MIS-TLIF cohort did not meet the MCID of ODI at 2 years postoperatively (p = 0.59). Demographic variables and baseline PROs were similar between groups. There were improvements across the PROs of both groups through 2 years, and there were no differences in any PROs between the O-TLIF and MIS-TLIF cohorts. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that higher baseline leg pain score (p = 0.017) and a diagnosis of spondylolisthesis (p = 0.0053) or degenerative disc disease (p = 0.022) were associated with achieving the MCID at 2 years after O-TLIF, whereas higher baseline leg pain score was associated with reaching the MCID after MIS-TLIF (p = 0.038).

CONCLUSIONS

Similar proportions of patients failed to reach the MCID of ODI at 2 years after O-TLIF or MIS-TLIF. Higher baseline leg pain score was predictive of achieving the MCID in both cohorts, whereas a diagnosis of spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease was predictive of reaching the MCID after O-TLIF. These data provide novel insights for patient counseling and suggest that either MIS-TLIF or O-TLIF does not overcome specific patient factors to mitigate clinical success or failure in terms of the intermediate-term PROs associated with 1- to 2-level lumbar fusion surgical procedures for degenerative pathologies.

Restricted access

Raphaële Charest-Morin, Christopher S. Bailey, Greg McIntosh, Y. Raja Rampersaud, W. Bradley Jacobs, David W. Cadotte, Jérome Paquet, Hamilton Hall, Michael H. Weber, Michael G. Johnson, Andrew Nataraj, Najmedden Attabib, Neil Manson, Philippe Phan, Sean D. Christie, Kenneth C. Thomas, Charles G. Fisher, and Nicolas Dea

OBJECTIVE

In multilevel posterior cervical instrumented fusion, extension of fusion across the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) at T1 or T2 has been associated with decreased rates of reoperation and pseudarthrosis but with longer surgical time and increased blood loss. The impact on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) remains unclear. The primary objective was to determine whether extension of fusion through the CTJ influenced PROs at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The secondary objective was to compare the number of patients who reached the minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) for the PROs, modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, length of stay, discharge disposition, adverse events (AEs), reoperation within 24 months of surgery, and patient satisfaction.

METHODS

This was a retrospective observational cohort study of prospectively collected multicenter data of patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy. Patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion of 4 levels or greater (between C2 and T2) between January 2015 and October 2020 and received 24 months of follow-up were included. PROs (scores on the Neck Disability Index [NDI], EQ-5D, physical component summary and mental component summary of SF-12, and numeric rating scale for arm and neck pain) and mJOA scores were compared using ANCOVA and adjusted for baseline differences. Patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and surgical details were abstracted. The proportions of patients who reached the MCIDs for these outcomes were compared with the chi-square test. Operative duration, intraoperative blood loss, AEs, reoperation, discharge disposition, length of stay, and satisfaction was compared by using the chi-square test for categorical variables and the independent-samples t-test for continuous variables.

RESULTS

A total of 198 patients were included in this study (101 patients with fusion not crossing the CTJ and 97 with fusion crossing the CTJ). Patients with a construct extending through the CTJ were more likely to be female and have worse baseline NDI scores (p > 0.05). When adjusted for baseline differences, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of the PROs and mJOA scores at 3, 12, and 24 months. Surgical duration was longer (p < 0.001) and intraoperative blood loss was greater in the group with fusion extending to the upper thoracic spine (p = 0.013). There were no significant differences between groups in terms of AEs (p > 0.05). Fusion with a construct crossing the CTJ was associated with reoperation (p = 0.04). Satisfaction with surgery was not significantly different between groups. The proportions of patients who reached the MCIDs for the PROs were not statistically different at any time point.

CONCLUSIONS

There were no statistically significant differences in PROs between patients with a posterior construct extending to the upper thoracic spine and those without such extension for as long as 24 months after surgery. The AE profiles were not significantly different, but longer surgical time and increased blood loss were associated with constructs extending across the CTJ.

Restricted access

Lior M. Elkaim, Greg McIntosh, Nicolas Dea, Rodrigo Navarro-Ramirez, W. Bradley Jacobs, David W. Cadotte, Supriya Singh, Sean D. Christie, Aaron Robichaud, Philippe Phan, Jérôme Paquet, Andrew Nataraj, Hamilton Hall, Christopher S. Bailey, Y. Raja Rampersaud, Kenneth Thomas, Neil Manson, Charles Fisher, and Michael H. Weber

OBJECTIVE

Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) is an important public health issue. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for moderate and severe DCM. Delayed discharge of patients after DCM surgery is associated with increased healthcare costs. There is a paucity of data regarding predictive factors for discharge destination after scheduled surgery for patients with DCM. The purpose of this study was to identify factors predictive of home versus nonhome discharge after DCM surgery.

METHODS

Patients undergoing scheduled DCM surgery who had been enrolled in a prospective DCM substudy of the Canadian Spine Outcomes and Research Network registry between January 2015 and October 2020 were included in this retrospective analysis. Patient data were evaluated to identify potential factors predictive of home discharge after surgery. Logistic regression was used to identify independent factors predictive of home discharge. A multivariable model was then used as a final model.

RESULTS

Overall, 639 patients were included in the initial analysis, 543 (85%) of whom were discharged home. The mean age of the entire cohort was 60 years (SD 11.8 years), with a BMI of 28.9 (SD 5.7). Overall, 61.7% of the patients were female. The mean length of stay was 2.72 days (SD 1.7 days). The final internally validated bootstrapped multivariable model revealed that younger age, higher 9-Item Patient Health Questionnaire score, lower Neck Disability Index scores, fewer operated levels, mJOA scores indicating mild disease, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion procedure, and no perioperative adverse effects were predictive of home discharge.

CONCLUSIONS

Younger age, less neck-related disability, fewer operated levels, more significant depression, less severe myelopathy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion procedure, and no perioperative adverse effects are predictive of home discharge after surgery for DCM. These factors can help to guide clinical decision-making and optimize postoperative care pathways.

Restricted access

Supriya Singh, Tamir Ailon, Greg McIntosh, Nicolas Dea, Jerome Paquet, Edward Abraham, Christopher S. Bailey, Michael H. Weber, Michael G. Johnson, Andrew Nataraj, R. Andrew Glennie, Najmedden Attabib, Adrienne Kelly, Hamilton Hall, Y. Raja Rampersaud, Neil Manson, Philippe Phan, Kenneth Thomas, Charles G. Fisher, and Raphaële Charest-Morin

OBJECTIVE

Time to return to work (RTW) after elective lumbar spine surgery is variable and dependent on many factors including patient, work-related, and surgical factors. The primary objective of this study was to describe the time and rate of RTW after elective lumbar spine surgery. Secondary objectives were to determine predictors of early RTW (< 90 days) and no RTW in this population.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the multicenter Canadian Spine Outcomes and Research Network (CSORN) surgical registry was performed to identify patients who were employed and underwent elective 1- or 2-level discectomy, laminectomy, and/or fusion procedures between January 2015 and December 2019. The percentage of patients who returned to work and the time to RTW postoperatively were calculated. Predictors of early RTW and not returning to work were determined using a multivariable Cox regression model and a multivariable logistic regression model, respectively.

RESULTS

Of the 1805 employed patients included in this analysis, 71% returned to work at a median of 61 days. The median RTW after a discectomy, laminectomy, or fusion procedure was 51, 46, and 90 days, respectively. Predictors of early RTW included male gender, higher education level (high school or above), higher preoperative Physical Component Summary score, working preoperatively, a nonfusion procedure, and surgery in a western Canadian province (p < 0.05). Patients who were working preoperatively were twice as likely to RTW within 90 days (HR 1.984, 95% CI 1.680–2.344, p < 0.001) than those who were employed but not working. Predictors of not returning to work included symptoms lasting more than 2 years, an increased number of comorbidities, an education level below high school, and an active workers’ compensation claim (p < 0.05). There were fourfold odds of not returning to work for patients who had not been working preoperatively (OR 4.076, 95% CI 3.087–5.383, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

In the Canadian population, 71% of a preoperatively employed segment returned to work after 1- or 2-level lumbar spine surgery. Most patients who undergo a nonfusion procedure RTW after 6 to 8 weeks, whereas patients undergoing a fusion procedure RTW at 12 weeks. Working preoperatively significantly increased the likelihood of early RTW.

Restricted access

Supriya Singh, Tamir Ailon, Greg McIntosh, Nicolas Dea, Jerome Paquet, Edward Abraham, Christopher S. Bailey, Michael H. Weber, Michael G. Johnson, Andrew Nataraj, R. Andrew Glennie, Najmedden Attabib, Adrienne Kelly, Hamilton Hall, Y. Raja Rampersaud, Neil Manson, Philippe Phan, Kenneth Thomas, Charles G. Fisher, and Raphaële Charest-Morin

OBJECTIVE

Time to return to work (RTW) after elective lumbar spine surgery is variable and dependent on many factors including patient, work-related, and surgical factors. The primary objective of this study was to describe the time and rate of RTW after elective lumbar spine surgery. Secondary objectives were to determine predictors of early RTW (< 90 days) and no RTW in this population.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the multicenter Canadian Spine Outcomes and Research Network (CSORN) surgical registry was performed to identify patients who were employed and underwent elective 1- or 2-level discectomy, laminectomy, and/or fusion procedures between January 2015 and December 2019. The percentage of patients who returned to work and the time to RTW postoperatively were calculated. Predictors of early RTW and not returning to work were determined using a multivariable Cox regression model and a multivariable logistic regression model, respectively.

RESULTS

Of the 1805 employed patients included in this analysis, 71% returned to work at a median of 61 days. The median RTW after a discectomy, laminectomy, or fusion procedure was 51, 46, and 90 days, respectively. Predictors of early RTW included male gender, higher education level (high school or above), higher preoperative Physical Component Summary score, working preoperatively, a nonfusion procedure, and surgery in a western Canadian province (p < 0.05). Patients who were working preoperatively were twice as likely to RTW within 90 days (HR 1.984, 95% CI 1.680–2.344, p < 0.001) than those who were employed but not working. Predictors of not returning to work included symptoms lasting more than 2 years, an increased number of comorbidities, an education level below high school, and an active workers’ compensation claim (p < 0.05). There were fourfold odds of not returning to work for patients who had not been working preoperatively (OR 4.076, 95% CI 3.087–5.383, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

In the Canadian population, 71% of a preoperatively employed segment returned to work after 1- or 2-level lumbar spine surgery. Most patients who undergo a nonfusion procedure RTW after 6 to 8 weeks, whereas patients undergoing a fusion procedure RTW at 12 weeks. Working preoperatively significantly increased the likelihood of early RTW.