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Michael D. Staudt, Doron Rabin, Ali A. Baaj, Neil R. Crawford, and Neil Duggal

OBJECTIVE

There are limited data regarding the implications of revision posterior surgery in the setting of previous cervical arthroplasty (CA). The purpose of this study was to analyze segmental biomechanics in human cadaveric specimens with and without CA, in the context of graded posterior resection.

METHODS

Fourteen human cadaveric cervical spines (C3–T1 or C2–7) were divided into arthroplasty (ProDisc-C, n = 7) and control (intact disc, n = 7) groups. Both groups underwent sequential posterior element resections: unilateral foraminotomy, laminoplasty, and finally laminectomy. Specimens were studied sequentially in two different loading apparatuses during the induction of flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation.

RESULTS

Range of motion (ROM) after artificial disc insertion was reduced relative to that in the control group during axial rotation and lateral bending (13% and 28%, respectively; p < 0.05) but was similar during flexion and extension. With sequential resections, ROM increased by a similar magnitude following foraminotomy and laminoplasty in both groups. Laminectomy had a much greater effect: mean (aggregate) ROM during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation was increased by a magnitude of 52% following laminectomy in the setting of CA, compared to an 8% increase without arthroplasty. In particular, laminectomy in the setting of CA introduced significant instability in flexion-extension, characterized by a 90% increase in ROM from laminoplasty to laminectomy, compared to a 16% increase in ROM from laminoplasty to laminectomy without arthroplasty (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Foraminotomy and laminoplasty did not result in significant instability in the setting of CA, compared to controls. Laminectomy alone, however, resulted in a significant change in biomechanics, allowing for significantly increased flexion and extension. Laminectomy alone should be used with caution in the setting of previous CA.

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Michael D. Staudt, Ilknur Telkes, and Julie G. Pilitsis

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Michael D. Staudt, Holger Joswig, Gwynedd E. Pickett, Keith W. MacDougall, and Andrew G. Parrent

OBJECTIVE

The prevalence of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS-TN) is higher than in the general population (idiopathic TN [ITN]). Glycerol rhizotomy (GR) is a percutaneous lesioning surgery commonly performed for the treatment of medically refractory TN. While treatment for acute pain relief is excellent, long-term pain relief is poorer. The object of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous retrogasserian GR for the treatment of MS-TN versus ITN.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was performed, identifying 219 patients who had undergone 401 GR procedures from 1983 to 2018 at a single academic institution. All patients were diagnosed with medically refractory MS-TN (182 procedures) or ITN (219 procedures). The primary outcome measures of interest were immediate pain relief and time to pain recurrence following initial and repeat GR procedures. Secondary outcomes included medication usage and presence of periprocedural hypesthesia.

RESULTS

The initial pain-free response rate was similar between groups (p = 0.726): MS-TN initial GR 89.6%; MS-TN repeat GR 91.9%; ITN initial GR 89.6%; ITN repeat GR 87.0%. The median time to recurrence after initial GR was similar between MS-TN (2.7 ± 1.3 years) and ITN (2.1 ± 0.6 years) patients (p = 0.87). However, there was a statistically significant difference in the time to recurrence after repeat GR between MS-TN (2.3 ± 0.5 years) and ITN patients (1.2 ± 0.2 years; p < 0.05). The presence of periprocedural hypesthesia was highly predictive of pain-free survival (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with MS-TN achieve meaningful pain relief following GR, with an efficacy comparable to that following GR in patients with ITN. Initial and subsequent GR procedures are equally efficacious.

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James M. Wright, Michael D. Staudt, Andrea Alonso, Jonathan P. Miller, and Andrew E. Sloan

The authors describe the case of a 22-month-old boy who presented with gelastic seizures and developmental delay. Magnetic resonance imaging and video-electroencephalography monitoring revealed a primarily intraventricular hypothalamic hamartoma and gelastic seizures occurring 20–30 times daily. The patient was treated with various regimens of antiepileptic medications for 16 months, but the seizures remained medically intractable. At 3 years of age, he underwent stereotactic laser ablation with an aim of disconnection of the lesion. The procedure was performed with the NeuroBlate SideFire probe. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technology for this procedure and serves as proof of concept. There were no perioperative complications, and 2 years postprocedure, the patient remains seizure free with marked behavioral and cognitive improvements.

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Michael D. Staudt, Stephen H. Pasternak, Manas Sharma, Sachin K. Pandey, Miguel F. Arango, David M. Pelz, and Stephen P. Lownie

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a progressive clinical syndrome characterized by orthostatic headaches, nausea, emesis, and occasionally focal neurological deficits. Rarely, SIH is associated with neurocognitive changes. An epidural blood patch (EBP) is commonly used to treat SIH when conservative measures are inadequate, although some patients require multiple EBP procedures or do not respond at all. Recently, the use of a large-volume (LV) EBP has been described to treat occult leak sites in treatment-refractory SIH. This article describes the management of a patient with profound neurocognitive decline associated with SIH, who was refractory to conservative management and multiple interventions. The authors describe the successful use of an ultra-LV-EBP of 120 ml across multiple levels, the largest volume reported in the literature, and describe the technical aspects of the procedure. This procedure has resulted in dramatic and sustained symptom resolution.

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Amparo Wolf, Huda Alghefari, Daria Krivosheya, Michael D. Staudt, Gregory Bowden, David R. Macdonald, Sharan Goobie, David Ramsay, and Matthew O. Hebb

The biological origin of cerebellar liponeurocytomas is unknown, and hereditary forms of this disease have not been described. Here, the authors present clinical and histopathological findings of a young patient with a cerebellar liponeurocytoma who had multiple immediate family members who harbored similar intracranial tumors. A 37-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented with a history of progressive headaches. Lipomatous medulloblastoma had been diagnosed previously in her mother and maternal grandfather, and her maternal uncle had a supratentorial liponeurocytoma. MRI revealed a large, poorly enhancing, lipomatous mass emanating from the superior vermis that produced marked compression of posterior fossa structures. An uncomplicated supracerebellar infratentorial approach was used to resect the lesion. Genetic and histopathological analyses of the lesion revealed neuronal, glial, and lipomatous differentiation and confirmed the diagnosis of cerebellar liponeurocytoma. A comparison of the tumors resected from the patient and, 22 years previously, her mother revealed similar features. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is a poorly understood entity. This report provides novel evidence of an inheritable predisposition for tumor development. Accurate diagnosis and reporting of clinical outcomes and associated genetic and histopathological changes are necessary for guiding prognosis and developing recommendations for patient care.

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Olga Khazen, Marisa DiMarzio, Kelsey Platanitis, Heather C. Grimaudo, Maria Hancu, Miriam M. Shao, Michael D. Staudt, Lucy Maguire, Vishad V. Sukul, Jennifer Durphy, Era K. Hanspal, Octavian Adam, Eric Molho, and Julie G. Pilitsis

OBJECTIVE

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is known to reduce motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The effects of DBS on various nonmotor symptoms often differ from patient to patient. The factors that determine whether or not a patient will respond to treatment have not been elucidated. Here, the authors evaluated sex differences in pain relief after DBS for PD.

METHODS

The authors prospectively evaluated 20 patients preoperatively and postoperatively after bilateral STN DBS with the validated numeric rating scale (NRS), Revised Oswestry Disability Index for low-back pain (RODI), and King’s Parkinson’s Disease Pain Scale (KPDPS) and assessed the impact of sex as a biological variable.

RESULTS

The cohort consisted of 6 female and 14 male patients with a mean duration of 11.8 ± 2.0 months since DBS surgery. Females were significantly older (p = 0.02). Covariate analysis, however, showed no effect of age, stimulation settings, or other confounding variables. KPDPS total scores statistically significantly improved only among males (p < 0.001). Males improved more than females in musculoskeletal and chronic subsets of the KPDPS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). RODI scores significantly improved in males but not in females (p = 0.03 and p = 0.30, respectively). Regarding the NRS score, the improvements seen in both sexes in NRS were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Although it is well recognized that pain complaints in PD are different between men and women, this study is unique in that it examines the sex-specific DBS effects on this symptom. Considering sex as a biological variable may have important implications for DBS pain outcome studies moving forward.