Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael B. Sisti x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Michael B. Sisti, Abraham Kader and Bennett M. Stein

✓ The surgical outcome in a series of small arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) that might have been considered optimal for radiosurgery is reviewed. In a total microsurgical series of 360 patients, 67 (19%) underwent resection of AVM's less than 3 cm in largest diameter, regardless of location. Many of these lesions (45%) were in locations that might be considered surgically inaccessible such as the thalamus, brain stem, medial hemisphere, and paraventricular regions. Complete angiographic obliteration of the AVM by microsurgical technique was accomplished in 63 patients (94%) with a surgical morbidity of 1.5% and no operative mortality. Patients with hemispheric AVM's had a cure rate of 100% and no neurological morbidity. Stereotactically guided craniotomy was used in 14 patients (21%) to locate and resect deep or concealed malformations. The results from five major radiosurgery centers treating similar-sized AVM's are analyzed. The authors' surgical results compare favorably with those from radiosurgery centers which, in their opinion, supports the conclusion that microneurosurgery is superior to radiosurgery, except for a small percentage of lesions that are truly inoperable on the basis of inaccessibility.

Restricted access

Michael B. Sisti, Robert A. Solomon and Bennett M. Stein

✓ Surgical resection of 10 obscure arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) was accomplished with craniotomy guided by computerized tomography (CT) or angiography and the use of the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame. Stereotactic craniotomy was invaluable for resection of the following types of AVM's: 1) AVM's with a nidus less than 2 cm in diameter, 2) AVM's located in an eloquent area of the brain, and 3) AVM's located deep in the brain. Stereotactic localization of these AVM's on preoperative radiological studies provides a precise route to the nidus, often avoiding important areas of the brain. This series included six male and four female patients with a mean age of 32 years. All patients presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage, from which eight made a complete neurological recovery prior to surgery. Two AVM's were located on the cortex, three were found subcortically, and five were situated near the ventricles or in the deep white matter.

As a guide, angiography was used in six cases and CT in four cases. In each instance, the study providing the best image of the AVM nidus was employed. Postoperatively, no neurological deficits were found in eight patients and, in the two patients with preoperative deficits, neurological improvement was observed after recovery from surgery. Postoperative studies revealed complete removal of the AVM in all patients, and all lesions were confirmed histologically. The authors conclude that stereotactic craniotomy provides the optimum operative approach for the localization and microsurgical resection of AVM's that are either obscure or located deep in the brain.

Full access

Douglas Kondziolka

Restricted access
Full access

Raqeeb Haque, Teresa J. Wojtasiewicz, Paul R. Gigante, Mark A. Attiah, Brendan Huang, Steven R. Isaacson and Michael B. Sisti

Object

The goal of this article was to show that a combination of facial nerve–sparing microsurgical resection and Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for expansion of any residual tumor can preserve good facial nerve function in patients with recurrent vestibular schwannoma (VS).

Methods

Records of individuals treated by a single surgeon with a facial nerve–sparing technique for a VS between 1998 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed for tumor recurrence. Of the 383 patients treated for VS, 151 underwent microsurgical resection, and 20 (13.2%) of these patients required postoperative retreatment for a significant expansion of residual tumor after microsurgery. These 20 patients were re-treated with GKS.

Results

The rate of preservation of good facial nerve function (Grade I or II on the House-Brackmann scale) in patients treated with microsurgery for VS was 97%. Both subtotal and gross-total resection had excellent facial nerve preservation rates (97% vs 96%), although subtotal resection carried a higher risk that patients would require retreatment. In patients re-treated with GKS after microsurgery, the rate of facial nerve preservation was 95%.

Conclusions

In patients with tumors that cannot be managed with radiosurgery alone, a facial nerve–sparing resection followed by GKS for any significant regrowth provides excellent facial nerve preservation rates.

Free access

Randy S. D'Amico, Matei A. Banu, Petros Petridis, Alexandra S. Bercow, Hani Malone, Moshe Praver, Tony J. C. Wang, Steven R. Isaacson and Michael B. Sisti

OBJECTIVE

Advanced microsurgical techniques contribute to reduced morbidity and improved surgical management of meningiomas arising within the cerebellopontine angle (CPA). However, the goal of surgery has evolved to preserve the quality of the patient's life, even if it means leaving residual tumor. Concurrently, Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an acceptable and effective treatment modality for newly diagnosed, recurrent, or progressive meningiomas of the CPA. The authors review their institutional experience with CPA meningiomas treated with GKRS, surgery, or a combination of surgery and GKRS. They specifically focus on rates of facial nerve preservation and characterize specific anatomical features of tumor location with respect to the internal auditory canal (IAC).

METHODS

Medical records of 76 patients with radiographic evidence or a postoperative diagnosis of CPA meningioma, treated by a single surgeon between 1992 and 2016, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with CPA meningiomas smaller than 2.5 cm in greatest dimension were treated with GKRS, while patients with tumors 2.5 cm or larger underwent facial nerve–sparing microsurgical resection where appropriate. Various patient, clinical, and tumor data were gathered. Anatomical features of the tumor origin as seen on preoperative imaging confirmed by intraoperative investigation were evaluated for prognostic significance. Facial nerve preservation rates were evaluated.

RESULTS

According to our treatment paradigm, 51 (67.1%) patients underwent microsurgical resection and 25 (32.9%) patients underwent GKRS. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 34 (66.7%) patients, and subtotal resection (STR) in 17 (33.3%) patients. Tumors recurred in 12 (23.5%) patients initially treated surgically, requiring additional surgery and/or GKRS. Facial nerve function was unchanged or improved in 68 (89.5%) patients. Worsening facial nerve function occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, all of whom had undergone microsurgical resection. Upfront treatment with GKRS for CPA meningiomas smaller than 2.5 cm was associated with preservation of facial nerve function in all patients over a median follow-up of 46 months, regardless of IAC invasion and tumor origin. Anatomical origin was associated with extent of resection but did not correlate with postoperative facial nerve function. Tumor size, extent of resection, and the presence of an arachnoid plane separating the tumor and the contents of the IAC were associated with postoperative facial nerve outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

CPA meningiomas remain challenging lesions to treat, given their proximity to critical neurovascular structures. GKRS is a safe and effective option for managing CPA meningiomas smaller than 2.5 cm without associated mass effect or acute neurological symptoms. Maximal safe resection with preservation of neurological function can be performed for tumors 2.5 cm or larger without significant risk of facial nerve dysfunction, and, when combined with GKRS for recurrence and/or progression, provides excellent disease control. Anatomical features of the tumor origin offer critical insights for optimizing facial nerve preservation in this cohort.

Free access

Justin A. Neira, Timothy H. Ung, Jennifer S. Sims, Hani R. Malone, Daniel S. Chow, Jorge L. Samanamud, George J. Zanazzi, Xiaotao Guo, Stephen G. Bowden, Binsheng Zhao, Sameer A. Sheth, Guy M. McKhann II, Michael B. Sisti, Peter Canoll, Randy S. D'Amico and Jeffrey N. Bruce

OBJECTIVE

Extent of resection is an important prognostic factor in patients undergoing surgery for glioblastoma (GBM). Recent evidence suggests that intravenously administered fluorescein sodium associates with tumor tissue, facilitating safe maximal resection of GBM. In this study, the authors evaluate the safety and utility of intraoperative fluorescein guidance for the prediction of histopathological alteration both in the contrast-enhancing (CE) regions, where this relationship has been established, and into the non-CE (NCE), diffusely infiltrated margins.

METHODS

Thirty-two patients received fluorescein sodium (3 mg/kg) intravenously prior to resection. Fluorescence was intraoperatively visualized using a Zeiss Pentero surgical microscope equipped with a YELLOW 560 filter. Stereotactically localized biopsy specimens were acquired from CE and NCE regions based on preoperative MRI in conjunction with neuronavigation. The fluorescence intensity of these specimens was subjectively classified in real time with subsequent quantitative image analysis, histopathological evaluation of localized biopsy specimens, and radiological volumetric assessment of the extent of resection.

RESULTS

Bright fluorescence was observed in all GBMs and localized to the CE regions and portions of the NCE margins of the tumors, thus serving as a visual guide during resection. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 84% of the patients with an average resected volume of 95%, and this rate was higher among patients for whom GTR was the surgical goal (GTR achieved in 93.1% of patients, average resected volume of 99.7%). Intraoperative fluorescein staining correlated with histopathological alteration in both CE and NCE regions, with positive predictive values by subjective fluorescence evaluation greater than 96% in NCE regions.

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative administration of fluorescein provides an easily visualized marker for glioma pathology in both CE and NCE regions of GBM. These findings support the use of fluorescein as a microsurgical adjunct for guiding GBM resection to facilitate safe maximal removal.

Restricted access

Andrew L. A. Garton, Connor J. Kinslow, Ali I. Rae, Amol Mehta, Susan C. Pannullo, Rajiv S. Magge, Rohan Ramakrishna, Guy M. McKhann, Michael B. Sisti, Jeffrey N. Bruce, Peter Canoll, Simon K. Cheng, Adam M. Sonabend and Tony J. C. Wang

OBJECTIVE

Genomic analysis in neurooncology has underscored the importance of understanding the patterns of survival in different molecular subtypes within gliomas and their responses to treatment. In particular, diffuse gliomas are now principally characterized by their mutation status (IDH1 and 1p/19q codeletion), yet there remains a paucity of information regarding the prognostic value of molecular markers and extent of resection (EOR) on survival. Furthermore, given the modern emphasis on molecular rather than histological diagnosis, it is important to examine the effect of maximal resection on survival in all gliomas with 1p/q19 codeletions, as these will now be classified as oligodendrogliomas under the new WHO guidelines.

The objectives of the present study were twofold: 1) to assess the association between EOR and survival for patients with oligodendrogliomas in the National Cancer Database (NCDB), which includes information on mutation status, and 2) to demonstrate the same effect for all patients with 1p/19q codeleted gliomas in the NCDB.

METHODS

The NCDB was queried for all cases of oligodendroglioma between 2004 and 2014, with follow-up dates through 2016. The authors found 2514 cases of histologically confirmed oligodendrogliomas for the final analysis of the effect of EOR on survival. Upon further query, 1067 1p/19q-codeleted tumors were identified in the NCDB. Patients who received subtotal resection (STR) or gross-total resection (GTR) were compared to those who received no tumor debulking surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses of both overall survival and cause-specific survival were performed.

RESULTS

EOR was associated with increased overall survival for both histologically confirmed oligodendrogliomas and all 1p/19q-codeleted–defined tumors (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Tumor grade, location, and size covaried predictably with EOR. When evaluating tumors by each classification system for predictors of overall survival, facility setting, age, comorbidity index, grade, location, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy were all shown to be significantly associated with overall survival. While STR and GTR correlated with a stepwise increase in survival in oligodendrogliomas relative to biopsy (HR 0.70, p < 0.01; HR 0.51, p < 0.001, respectively), only GTR was observed to have the same effect in patients with 1p/19q-codeleted–defined tumors (HR 0.49, p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

By using the NCDB, the authors have demonstrated a side-by-side comparison of the survival benefits of greater EOR in 1p/19q-codeleted gliomas.