Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael A. Belfort x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Vijay M. Ravindra, Guillermo Aldave, Howard L. Weiner, Timothy Lee, Michael A. Belfort, Magdelena Sanz-Cortes, Jimmy Espinoza, Alireza A. Shamshirsaz, Ahmed A. Nassr, and William E. Whitehead

OBJECTIVE

The Management of Myelomeningocele Study demonstrated that fetal surgery, as compared to postnatal repair, decreases the rate of hydrocephalus and improves expected motor function. However, fetal surgery is associated with significant maternal and neonatal risks including uterine wall dehiscence, prematurity, and fetal or neonatal death. The goal of this study was to provide information about counseling expectant mothers regarding myelomeningocele in the era of fetal surgery.

METHODS

The authors conducted an extensive review of topics pertinent to counseling in the setting of myelomeningocele and introduce a new model for shared decision-making to aid practitioners during counseling.

RESULTS

Expectant mothers must decide in a timely manner among several potential options, namely termination of pregnancy, postnatal surgery, or fetal surgery. Multiple factors influence the decision, including maternal health, fetal heath, financial resources, social support, risk aversion, access to care, family planning, and values. In many cases, it is a difficult decision that benefits from the guidance of a pediatric neurosurgeon.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors review critical issues of prenatal counseling for myelomeningocele and discuss the process of shared decision-making as a framework to aid expectant mothers in choosing the treatment option best for them.

Restricted access

Nisha Gadgil, Samuel G. McClugage III, Guillermo Aldave, David F. Bauer, Howard L. Weiner, Thierry A. G. M. Huisman, Magdalena Sanz-Cortes, Michael A. Belfort, Lisa Emrick, Gary Clark, Luc Joyeux, and William E. Whitehead

OBJECTIVE

In utero repair of fetal posterior cephaloceles (meningocele and encephalocele) is being performed based on the premise that fetal surgery prevents progressive herniation of neural tissue and brain damage during pregnancy. However, the extent to which progressive herniation occurs during pregnancy, specifically from prenatal diagnosis to after delivery, is not well known. The objective of this study was to describe the natural history of patients with fetal cephaloceles focusing on the incidence of progressive herniation.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients referred to their center for posterior fetal cephalocele between 2006 and 2021. All patients underwent prenatal and postnatal MRI. Progressive herniation (primary outcome) was defined as an increase in the absolute volume of neural tissue within the cephalocele of > 5% or new herniation of a critical structure into the cephalocele. Total brain and cephalocele volumes were calculated to determine herniation progression from prenatal to postnatal MRI. Information on the presence of hydrocephalus, epilepsy, and developmental delay (secondary outcomes) was collected at 1 year of age.

RESULTS

Twenty patients met all study criteria. Ten patients (50%; 95% CI 0.27–0.73) demonstrated progressive herniation from prenatal to postnatal MRI. Three patients with progressive herniation were diagnosed with a meningocele prenatally and had an encephalocele postnatally. Two patients without progression had meningocele identified prenatally that regressed and became atretic by birth. Both prenatal hindbrain herniation (p = 0.03) and prenatal microcephaly (p = 0.05) were predictive of progressive herniation. The rates of hydrocephalus (44%), epilepsy (44%), and developmental delay (63%) were not associated with the occurrence of progressive herniation in this study.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, progressive herniation was not a rare event (50%). Fetal hindbrain herniation and fetal microcephaly were associated with the occurrence of progressive herniation. These results support further investigations into why progressive herniation occurs in utero and if progressive cerebral herniation in utero plays a significant role in determining clinical outcome.