Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Matthew Kay x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Sunil Manjila, Timothy Bazil, Matthew Thomas, Sunithi Mani, Matthew Kay and Unni Udayasankar

This paper is a narrative review of extraaxial developmental venous anomalies (eDVAs) of the brain involving dural venous flow or sinuses: persistent embryonic sinuses, sinus pericranii, enlarged emissary veins, and venous varices or aneurysmal malformations. The article highlights the natural history, anatomy, embryology, imaging, clinical implications, and neurosurgical significance of these lesions, which the authors believe represent a continuum, with different entities characterized by distinct embryopathologic features. The indications and surgical management options are discussed for these individual intracranial pathologies with relevant illustrations, and a novel classification is proposed for persistent falcine sinus (PFS). The role of neurointervention and/or microsurgery in specific cases such as sinus pericranii and enlarged emissary veins of the skull is highlighted.

A better understanding of the pathophysiology and developmental anatomy of these lesions can reduce treatment morbidity and mortality. Some patients, including those with vein of Galen malformations (VOGMs), can present with the added systemic morbidity of a high-output cardiac failure. Although VOGM is the most studied and classified of the above-mentioned eDVAs, the authors believe that grouping the former with the other venous anomalies/abnormalities listed above would enable the clinician to convey the exact morphophysiological configuration of these lesions, predict their natural history with respect to evolving venous hypertension or stroke, and extrapolate invaluable insights from VOGM treatment to the treatment of other eDVAs. In recent years, many of these symptomatic venous malformations have been treated with endovascular interventions, although these techniques are still being refined. The authors highlight the broad concept of eDVAs and hope that this work will serve as a basis for future studies investigating the role of evolving focal venous hypertension/global intracranial hypertension and possibilities of fetal surgical intervention in these cases.

Free access

Sunil Manjila, Timothy Bazil, Matthew Kay, Unni K. Udayasankar and Maroun Semaan

OBJECTIVE

There is no definitive or consensus classification system for the jugular bulb position that can be uniformly communicated between a radiologist, neurootologist, and neurosurgeon. A high-riding jugular bulb (HRJB) has been variably defined as a jugular bulb that rises to or above the level of the basal turn of the cochlea, within 2 mm of the internal auditory canal (IAC), or to the level of the superior tympanic annulus. Overall, there is a seeming lack of consensus, especially when MRI and/or CT are used for jugular bulb evaluation without a dedicated imaging study of the venous anatomy such as digital subtraction angiography or CT or MR venography.

METHODS

A PubMed analysis of “jugular bulb” comprised of 1264 relevant articles were selected and analyzed specifically for an HRJB. A novel classification system based on preliminary skull base imaging using CT is proposed by the authors for conveying the anatomical location of the jugular bulb. This new classification includes the following types: type 1, no bulb; type 2, below the inferior margin of the posterior semicircular canal (SCC), subclassified as type 2a (without dehiscence into the middle ear) or type 2b (with dehiscence into the middle ear); type 3, between the inferior margin of the posterior SCC and the inferior margin of the IAC, subclassified as type 3a (without dehiscence into the middle ear) and type 3b (with dehiscence into the middle ear); type 4, above the inferior margin of the IAC, subclassified as type 4a (without dehiscence into the IAC) and type 4b (with dehiscence into the IAC); and type 5, combination of dehiscences. Appropriate CT and MR images of the skull base were selected to validate the criteria and further demonstrated using 3D reconstruction of DICOM files. The microsurgical significance of the proposed classification is evaluated with reference to specific skull base/posterior fossa pathologies.

RESULTS

The authors validated the role of a novel classification of jugular bulb location that can help effective communication between providers treating skull base lesions. Effective utilization of the above grading system can help plan surgical procedures and anticipate complications.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors have proposed a novel anatomical/radiological classification system for jugular bulb location with respect to surgical implications. This classification can help surgeons in complication avoidance and management when addressing HRJBs.

Free access

Orel A. Zaninovich, Mauricio J. Avila, Matthew Kay, Jennifer L. Becker, R. John Hurlbert and Nikolay L. Martirosyan

OBJECTIVE

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MRI tool that provides an objective, noninvasive, in vivo assessment of spinal cord injury (SCI). DTI is significantly better at visualizing microstructures than standard MRI sequences. In this imaging modality, the direction and amplitude of the diffusion of water molecules inside tissues is measured, and this diffusion can be measured using a variety of parameters. As a result, the potential clinical application of DTI has been studied in several spinal cord pathologies, including SCI. The aim of this study was to describe the current state of the potential clinical utility of DTI in patients with SCI and the challenges to its use as a tool in clinical practice.

METHODS

A search in the PubMed database was conducted for articles relating to the use of DTI in SCI. The citations of relevant articles were also searched for additional articles.

RESULTS

Among the most common DTI metrics are fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. Changes in these metrics reflect changes in tissue integrity. Several DTI metrics and combinations thereof have demonstrated significant correlations with clinical function both in model species and in humans. Its applications encompass the full spectrum of the clinical assessment of SCI including diagnosis, prognosis, recovery, and efficacy of treatments in both the spinal cord and potentially the brain.

CONCLUSIONS

DTI and its metrics have great potential to become a powerful clinical tool in SCI. However, the current limitations of DTI preclude its use beyond research and into clinical practice. Further studies are needed to significantly improve and resolve these limitations as well as to determine reliable time-specific changes in multiple DTI metrics for this tool to be used accurately and reliably in the clinical setting.