Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for

  • Author or Editor: Matthew B. Potts x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Johan Pallud and Emmanuel Mandonnet

Full access

Matthew B. Potts, Darryl Lau, Adib A. Abla, Helen Kim, William L. Young and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECT

Resection is an appealing therapy for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) because of its high cure rate, low complication rate, and immediacy, and has become the first-line therapy for many AVMs. To clarify safety, efficacy, and outcomes associated with AVM resection in the aftermath of A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVMs (ARUBA), the authors reviewed their experience with low-grade AVMs—the most favorable AVMs for surgery and the ones most likely to have been selected for treatment outside of ARUBA's randomization process.

METHODS

A prospective AVM registry was searched to identify patients with Spetzler-Martin Grade I and II AVMs treated using resection during a 16-year period.

RESULTS

Of the 232 surgical patients included, 120 (52%) presented with hemorrhage, 33% had Spetzler-Martin Grade I, and 67% had Grade II AVMs. Overall, 99 patients (43%) underwent preoperative embolization, with unruptured AVMs embolized more often than ruptured AVMs. AVM resection was accomplished in all patients and confirmed angiographically in 218 patients (94%). There were no deaths among patients with unruptured AVMs. Good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score 0–1) were found in 78% of patients, with 97% improved or unchanged from their preoperative mRS scores. Patients with unruptured AVMs had better functional outcomes (91% good outcome vs 65% in the ruptured group, p = 0.0008), while relative outcomes were equivalent (98% improved/unchanged in patients with ruptured AVMs vs 96% in patients with unruptured AVMs).

CONCLUSIONS

Surgery should be regarded as the “gold standard” therapy for the majority of low-grade AVMs, utilizing conservative embolization as a preoperative adjunct. High surgical cure rates and excellent functional outcomes in patients with both ruptured and unruptured AVMs support a dominant surgical posture for low-grade AVMS, with radiosurgery reserved for risky AVMs in deep, inaccessible, and highly eloquent locations. Despite the technological advances in endovascular and radiosurgical therapy, surgery still offers the best cure rate, lowest risk profile, and greatest protection against hemorrhage for low-grade AVMs. ARUBA results are influenced by a low randomization rate, bias toward nonsurgical therapies, a shortage of surgical expertise, a lower rate of complete AVM obliteration, a higher rate of delayed hemorrhage, and short study duration. Another randomized trial is needed to reestablish the role of surgery in unruptured AVM management.

Restricted access

Matthew B. Potts, Justin S. Smith, Annette M. Molinaro and Mitchel S. Berger

Object

Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) are rarely diagnosed as an incidental, asymptomatic finding, and it is not known how the early surgical management of these tumors might affect outcome. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients with incidental and symptomatic LGGs and determine any prognostic factors associated with those outcomes.

Methods

All patients treated by the lead author for an LGG incidentally discovered between 1999 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. “Incidental” was defined as a finding on imaging that was obtained for a reason not attributable to the glioma, such as trauma or headache. Primary outcomes included overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and malignant PFS. Patients with incidental LGGs were compared with a previously reported cohort of patients with symptomatic gliomas.

Results

Thirty-five patients with incidental LGGs were identified. The most common reasons for head imaging were headache not associated with mass effect (31.4%) and trauma (20%). Patients with incidental lesions had significantly lower preoperative tumor volumes than those with symptomatic lesions (20.2 vs 53.9 cm3, p < 0.001), were less likely to have tumors in eloquent locations (14.3% vs 61.9%, p < 0.001), and had a higher prevalence of females (57.1% vs 36%, p = 0.02). In addition, patients with incidental lesions were also more likely to undergo gross-total resection (60% vs 31.5%, p = 0.001) and had improved overall survival on Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.039, Mantel-Cox test). Progression and malignant progression rates did not differ between the 2 groups. Univariate analysis identified pre- and postoperative volumes as well as the use of motor or language mapping as significant prognostic factors for PFS.

Conclusions

In this retrospective cohort of surgically managed LGGs, incidentally discovered lesions were associated with improved patient survival as compared with symptomatic LGGs, with acceptable surgical risks.

Restricted access

Edward F. Chang, Rodney A. Gabriel, Matthew B. Potts, Mitchel S. Berger and Michael T. Lawton

Object

Resection of cavernous malformations (CMs) located in functionally eloquent areas of the supratentorial compartment is controversial. Hemorrhage from untreated lesions can result in devastating neurological injury, but surgery has potentially serious risks. We hypothesized that an organized system of approaches can guide operative planning and lead to acceptable neurological outcomes in surgical patients.

Methods

The authors reviewed the presentation, surgery, and outcomes of 79 consecutive patients who underwent microresection of supratentorial CMs in eloquent and deep brain regions (basal ganglia [in 27 patients], sensorimotor cortex [in 23], language cortex [in 3], thalamus [in 6], visual cortex [in 10], and corpus callosum [in 10]). A total of 13 different microsurgical approaches were organized into 4 groups: superficial, lateral transsylvian, medial interhemispheric, and posterior approaches.

Results

The majority of patients (93.7%) were symptomatic. Hemorrhage with resulting focal neurological deficit was the most common presentation in 53 patients (67%). Complete resection, as determined by postoperative MR imaging, was achieved in 76 patients (96.2%). Overall, the functional neurological status of patients improved after microsurgical dissection at the time of discharge from the hospital and at follow-up. At 6 months, 64 patients (81.0%) were improved relative to their preoperative condition and 14 patients (17.7%) were unchanged. Good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score ≤ 2, living independently) were achieved in 77 patients (97.4%). Multivariate analysis of demographic and surgical factors revealed that preoperative functional status was the only predictor of postoperative modified Rankin Scale score (OR 4.6, p = 0.001). Six patients (7.6%) had transient worsening of neurological examination after surgery, and 1 patient (1.3%) was permanently worse. There was no surgical mortality.

Conclusions

The authors present a system of 13 microsurgical approaches to 6 location targets with 4 general trajectories to facilitate safe access to supratentorial CMs in eloquent brain regions. Favorable neurological outcomes following microsurgical resection justify an aggressive surgical attitude toward these lesions.

Free access

Matthew B. Potts, Daniel W. Zumofen, Eytan Raz, Peter K. Nelson and Howard A. Riina

Endovascular embolization is typically reserved as an adjuvant therapy in the management of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), either for preoperative devascularization or preradiosurgical volume reduction. Curative embolization plays a limited role in AVM treatment but several studies have shown that it is possible, especially with later-generation liquid embolic agents. Given the complexity of AVM anatomy and the recent controversies over the role of any intervention in AVM management, it is critical that the cerebrovascular community better define the indications of each treatment modality to provide quality AVM management. In this review, the authors evaluate the role of curative AVM embolization. Important considerations in the feasibility of curative AVM embolization include whether it can be performed reliably and safely, and whether it is a durable cure. Studies over the past 20 years have begun to define the anatomical factors that are amenable to complete endovascular occlusion, including size, feeding artery anatomy, AVM morphology, and endovascular accessibility. More recent studies have shown that highly selected patients with AVMs can be treated with curative intent, leading to occlusion rates as high as 100% of such prospectively identified lesions with minimal morbidity. Advances in endovascular technology and techniques that support the efficacy and safety of curative embolization are discussed, as is the importance of superselective diagnostic angiography. Finally, the durability of curative embolization is analyzed. Overall, while still unproven, endovascular embolization has the potential to be a safe, effective, and durable curative treatment for select AVMs, broadening the armamentarium with which one can treat this disease.

Restricted access

Edward F. Chang, Matthew B. Potts, G. Evren Keles, Kathleen R. Lamborn, Susan M. Chang, Nicholas M. Barbaro and Mitchel S. Berger

Object

Seizures play an important role in the clinical presentation and postoperative quality of life of patients who undergo surgical resection of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). The aim of this study was to identify factors that influenced perioperative seizure characteristics and postoperative seizure control.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective chart review of all cases involving adult patients who underwent initial surgery for LGGs at the University of California, San Francisco between 1997 and 2003.

Results

Three hundred and thirty-two cases were included for analysis; 269 (81%) of the 332 patients presented with ≥ 1 seizures (generalized alone, 33%; complex partial alone, 16%; simple partial alone, 22%; and combination, 29%). Cortical location and oligodendroglioma and oligoastrocytoma subtypes were significantly more likely to be associated with seizures compared with deeper midline locations and astrocytoma, respectively (p = 0.017 and 0.001, respectively; multivariate analysis). Of the 269 patients with seizures, 132 (49%) had pharmacoresistant seizures before surgery. In these patients, seizures were more likely to be simple partial and to involve the temporal lobe, and the period from seizure onset to surgery was likely to have been longer (p = 0.0005, 0.0089, and 0.006, respectively; multivariate analysis). For the cohort of patients that presented with seizures, 12-month outcome after surgery (Engel class) was as follows: seizure free (I), 67%; rare seizures (II), 17%; meaningful seizure improvement (III), 8%; and no improvement or worsening (IV), 9%. Poor seizure control was more common in patients with longer seizure history (p < 0.001) and simple partial seizures (p = 0.004). With respect to treatment-related variables, seizure control was far more likely to be achieved after gross-total resection than after subtotal resection/biopsy alone (odds ratio 16, 95% confidence interval 2.2–124, p = 0.0064). Seizure recurrence after initial postoperative seizure control was associated with tumor progression (p = 0.001).

Conclusions

The majority of patients with LGG present with seizures; in approximately half of these patients, the seizures are pharmacoresistant before surgery. Postoperatively, > 90% of these patients are seizure free or have meaningful improvement. A shorter history of seizures and gross-total resection appear to be associated with a favorable prognosis for seizure control.

Full access

Matthew B. Potts, Maksim Shapiro, Daniel W. Zumofen, Eytan Raz, Erez Nossek, Keith G. DeSousa, Tibor Becske, Howard A. Riina and Peter K. Nelson

OBJECTIVE

The Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) is now a well-established option for the treatment of giant or complex aneurysms, especially those arising from the anterior circulation. Considering the purpose of such treatment is to maintain patency of the parent vessel, postembolization occlusion of the parent artery can be regarded as an untoward outcome. Antiplatelet therapy in the posttreatment period is therefore required to minimize such events. Here, the authors present a series of patients with anterior circulation aneurysms treated with the PED who subsequently experienced parent vessel occlusion (PVO).

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of all anterior circulation aneurysms consecutively treated at a single institution with the PED through 2014, identifying those with PVO on follow-up imaging. Aneurysm size and location, number of PEDs used, and follow-up digital subtraction angiography results were recorded. When available, pre- and postembolization platelet function testing results were also recorded.

RESULTS

Among 256 patients with anterior circulation aneurysms treated with the PED, the authors identified 8 who developed PVO after embolization. The mean aneurysm size in this cohort was 22.3 mm, and the number of PEDs used per case ranged from 2 to 10. Six patients were found to have asymptomatic PVO discovered incidentally on routine follow-up imaging between 6 months and 3 years postembolization, 3 of whom had documented “delayed” PVO with prior postembolization angiograms confirming aneurysm occlusion and a patent parent vessel at an earlier time. Two additional patients experienced symptomatic PVO, one of which was associated with early discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large series of anterior circulation aneurysms, the authors report a low incidence of symptomatic PVO, complicating premature discontinuation of postembolization antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. Beyond the subacute period, asymptomatic PVO was more common, particularly among complex fusiform or very large–necked aneurysms, highlighting an important phenomenon with the use of PED for the treatment of anterior circulation aneurysms, and suggesting that extended periods of antiplatelet coverage may be required in select complex aneurysms.

Full access

Matthew B. Potts, Jau-Ching Wu, Nalin Gupta and Praveen V. Mummaneni

Object

Symptomatic tethered cord and associated anomalies such as diastematomyelia rarely present during adulthood but can cause significant pain as well as motor, sensory, and bladder dysfunction. As with children, studies have shown that surgical detethering may provide improvement in pain and neurological deficits. Typical surgical management involves an open laminectomy, sectioning of the filum terminale, and exploration of the split cord malformation. Such open approaches, however, cause significant paraspinous muscle trauma and scarring. Recent advances in minimally invasive techniques allow for access to the spine and thecal sac while minimizing associated muscular trauma. The authors present a comparison of open versus minimally invasive surgery to treat adult tethered cord syndrome.

Methods

Six adult patients underwent surgical release of a tethered spinal cord (2 of them also had diastematomyelia). The mean age of the patients was 47.78 years (range 31–64 years). All medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed. Three of the patients underwent traditional open laminectomies for detethering (open group) while the other 3 patients underwent minimally invasive (mini-open) spinal cord detethering. The length of the incision, length of stay, estimated blood loss, and complications were compared between the 2 groups.

Results

All 6 patients had tethered spinal cords, and 1 patient in each group had diastematomyelia. The mean estimated blood loss during surgery (300 ml in the open group vs 167 ml in the mini-open group, p = 0.313) and the mean length of stay (7 days in the open group vs 6.3 days in the mini-open group, p = 0.718) were similar between the 2 groups. The incision length was half as long in the mini-open group versus the open group. However, 1 patient in the mini-open group developed a postoperative pseudomeningocele requiring surgical revision, whereas the open group had no revision surgeries.

Conclusions

Cases of symptomatic diastematomyelia and tethered cord in adults can be safely and effectively explored through a mini-open approach. In this small case series, the authors did find that the mini-open group had an incision that was 50% smaller than the open group, but they did not find a significant clinical difference between the groups.

Full access

Matthew B. Potts, Sunil A. Sheth, Jonathan Louie, Matthew D. Smyth, Penny K. Sneed, Michael W. McDermott, Michael T. Lawton, William L. Young, Steven W. Hetts, Heather J. Fullerton and Nalin Gupta

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established treatment modality for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children, but the optimal treatment parameters and associated treatment-related complications are not fully understood. The authors present their single-institution experience of using SRS, at a relatively low marginal dose, to treat AVMs in children for nearly 20 years; they report angiographic outcomes, posttreatment hemorrhage rates, adverse treatment-related events, and functional outcomes.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 2 cohorts of children (18 years of age or younger) with AVMs treated from 1991 to 1998 and from 2000 to 2010.

Results

A total of 80 patients with follow-up data after SRS were identified. Mean age at SRS was 12.7 years, and 56% of patients had hemorrhage at the time of presentation. Median target volume was 3.1 cm3 (range 0.09–62.3 cm3), and median prescription marginal dose used was 17.5 Gy (range 12–20 Gy). Angiograms acquired 3 years after treatment were available for 47% of patients; AVM obliteration was achieved in 52% of patients who received a dose of 18–20 Gy and in 16% who received less than 18 Gy. At 5 years after SRS, the cumulative incidence of hemorrhage was 25% (95% CI 16%–37%). No permanent neurological deficits occurred in patients who did not experience posttreatment hemorrhage. Overall, good functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale Scores 0–2) were observed for 78% of patients; for 66% of patients, functional status improved or remained the same as before treatment.

Conclusions

A low marginal dose minimizes SRS-related neurological deficits but leads to low rates of obliteration and high rates of hemorrhage. To maximize AVM obliteration and minimize posttreatment hemorrhage, the authors recommend a prescription marginal dose of 18 Gy or more. In addition, SRS-related symptoms such as headache and seizures should be considered when discussing risks and benefits of SRS for treating AVMs in children.

Restricted access

Tahaamin Shokuhfar, Michael C. Hurley, Anas Al-Smadi, Sameer A. Ansari, Matthew B. Potts, Babak S. Jahromi, Tord D. Alden and Ali Shaibani

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this paper was assess the efficacy and safety of using the MynxGrip arterial closure device in pediatric neuroendovascular procedures where the use of closure devices remains off-label despite their validation and widespread use in adults.

METHODS

A retrospective review of all pediatric patients who underwent diagnostic or interventional neuroendovascular procedures at the authors’ institution was performed. MynxGrip use was predicated by an adequate depth of subcutaneous tissue and common femoral artery (CFA) diameter. Patients remained on supine bedrest for 2 hours after diagnostic procedures and for 3 hours after therapeutic procedures. Patient demographics, procedural details, hemostasis status, and complications were recorded.

RESULTS

Over 36 months, 83 MynxGrip devices were deployed in 53 patients (23 male and 30 female patients; mean age 14 years) who underwent neuroendovascular procedures. The right-side CFA was the main point of access for most procedures. The mean CFA diameter was 6.24 mm and ranged from 4 mm to 8.5 mm. Diagnostic angiography comprised 46% of the procedures. A single device failure occurred without any sequelae; the device was extracted, and hemostasis was achieved by manual compression with the placement of a Safeguard compression device. No other immediate or delayed major complications were recorded.

CONCLUSIONS

MynxGrip can be used safely in the pediatric population for effective hemostasis and has the advantage of earlier mobilization.