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Kenji Fukuda, Toshio Higashi, Masakazu Okawa, Mitsutoshi Iwaasa, Tsutomu Yoshioka, and Tooru Inoue

OBJECTIVE

The white-collar sign (WCS) is known as a thick neointimal tissue formation at the aneurysm neck after endovascular coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms, which may prevent aneurysm recanalization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors involved in the appearance of WCS and to identify radiological and clinical outcomes of treated aneurysms with WCS.

METHODS

The study included 140 patients with 149 aneurysms in which it was possible to confirm the aneurysm neck between the aneurysm sac and parent artery by using conventional angiography. The WCS was defined as a radiolucent band at the aneurysm neck on the angiogram at 6 months after initial embolization. The radiological outcome was evaluated using MR angiography.

RESULTS

In 23 of 149 aneurysms (15.4%), a WCS appeared. The WCS-positive group had a significantly smaller neck size (3.3 ± 0.8 mm vs 4.2 ± 1.1 mm, p < 0.001) and smaller aneurysm size (4.3 ± 0.9 mm vs 6.0 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001) than the WCS-negative group. Multivariate analysis revealed that WCS appearance was associated with small neck size (OR 0.376, 95% CI 0.179–0.787; p = 0.009). In 106 of 149 aneurysms, the rate of complete occlusion was significantly higher in the WCS-positive group (18/18, 100%) than in the WCS-negative group (n = 54/88, 61.4%; p = 0.001) in the mean follow-up period of 31.0 ± 9.7 months (range 5–52 months). Neither major recanalization nor rupture of the aneurysm occurred in the WCS-positive group.

CONCLUSIONS

Appearance of the WCS was associated with complete occlusion and good clinical outcome after endovascular coil embolization. The WCS would help to determine the prognosis of cerebral aneurysms after endovascular treatment.

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Koji Iihara, Masakazu Okawa, Tomohito Hishikawa, Naoaki Yamada, Kazuhito Fukushima, Hidehiro Iida, and Susumu Miyamoto

The authors report a rare case of slowly progressive neuronal death associated with postischemic hyperperfusion in cortical laminar necrosis after radial artery/external carotid artery–middle cerebral artery bypass graft surgery for an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm. Under barbiturate protection, a 69-year-old man underwent high-flow bypass surgery combined with carotid artery sacrifice for a symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm. The patient became restless postoperatively, and this restlessness peaked on postoperative Day (POD) 7. Diffusion-weighted and FLAIR MR images obtained on PODs 1 and 7 revealed subtle cortical hyperintensity in the temporal cortex subjected to temporary occlusion. On POD 13, 123I-iomazenil (123I-IMZ) SPECT clearly showed increased distribution on the early image and mildly decreased binding on the delayed image with count ratios of the affected–unaffected corresponding regions of interest of 1.23 and 0.84, respectively, suggesting postischemic hyperperfusion. This was consistent with the finding on 123I-iodoamphetamine SPECT. Of note, neuronal density in the affected cortex on the delayed 123I-IMZ image further decreased to the affected/unaffected ratio of 0.44 on POD 55 during the subacute stage when characteristic cortical hyperintensity on T1-weighted MR imaging, typical of cortical laminar necrosis, was emerging. The affected cortex showed marked atrophy 8 months after the operation despite complete neurological recovery. This report illustrates, for the first time, dynamic neuroradiological correlations between slowly progressive neuronal death shown by 123I-IMZ SPECT and cortical laminar necrosis on MR imaging in human stroke.

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Masakazu Okawa, Takaaki Amamoto, Hiroshi Abe, Sohei Yoshimura, Toshio Higashi, and Tooru Inoue

Wake-up stroke is most likely to be caused by small-vessel disease, and is related to snoring. The authors present a rare case of far-lateral cervical disc herniation with neck rotation, resulting in wake-up stroke in a young woman. The patient, a 31-year-old woman, was admitted to the hospital because of dysarthria and confusion when she awoke in the morning. Brain MRI showed acute infarction in the posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography showed thrombus in the distal top of the basilar artery and the bilateral posterior cerebral arteries. During angiography, the thrombus size decreased with heparinization. There was severe stenosis of the right vertebral artery (VA) at C5–6, and head rotation to the right resulted in complete occlusion of the right VA. Neck MRI showed far-lateral intervertebral disc herniation. Surgical decompression of the VA was performed via the anterior cervical approach. Histological examination showed a degenerative intervertebral disc. Postoperative angiography confirmed successful decompression of the VA.

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Tetsuya Ueba, Masakazu Okawa, Hiroshi Abe, Masani Nonaka, Mitsutoshi Iwaasa, Toshio Higashi, Tooru Inoue, and Koichi Takano

Object

Indocyanine green (ICG) videography is commonly used in the neurosurgical field for minimally invasive neurosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new intraoperative imaging modality by performing transdural ICG videography during surgery for meningiomas.

Methods

Between March 2011 and April 2012, 10 patients with meningiomas received intravenous injection of 12.5 mg ICG just prior to dural opening. The cases comprised 8 convexity meningiomas and 2 foramen magnum meningiomas. Efficacy of the transdural ICG videography was assessed in terms of the tumor volume, the circulation time from the first appearance of the vessel to the appearance of the venous sinus, the tendency to bleed, and the discrimination of the venous sinus.

Results

The mean tumor volume was 71.6 ± 87.9 ml (the mean is expressed ± SD throughout). The cortical arteries, veins, and the venous sinus were identified by the ICG videography transdurally. The projection of the meningiomas was identified by a shadow (which the authors call the eclipse sign). Total eclipse signs were obtained in 8 cases and partial eclipse signs were obtained in 2 cases; tumor volume in the latter was more than 200 ml. In 5 of 10 cases the adjacent venous sinuses were exposed and were successfully visualized by ICG videography in 5.92 ± 1.05 seconds from the first appearance of the vessel. In 5 of 10 cases the total and the partial eclipse signs were diminished in 3.46 ± 1.31 seconds. The diminishment of the total and the partial eclipse sign was earlier than the visualization of the venous sinus (p = 0.011, t-test), revealing bleeding from the tumor that was observed until coagulation of the feeding arteries from the intracranial arteries.

Conclusions

Prior to opening of the dura mater, transdural ICG videography was used successfully to visualize the dural attachment of meningiomas and the venous sinus, resulting in safe and appropriate dural opening. The diminishment of the total and partial eclipse signs may represent significant feeding from the intracranial arteries and a tendency to bleed during resection.

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Tao Yang, Kazumichi Yoshida, Takakuni Maki, Yasutaka Fushimi, Kiyofumi Yamada, Masakazu Okawa, Yu Yamamoto, Naoki Takayama, Keita Suzuki, and Susumu Miyamoto

OBJECTIVE

Carotid webs (CWs) have increasingly been recognized as a cause of recurrent ischemic stroke. However, the natural history and clinical course of CWs remain unclear. The authors aimed to clarify the prevalence, imaging features, and optimal treatment of CWs in a Japanese cohort study.

METHODS

A series of 444 consecutive Japanese patients who had undergone CTA of the head and neck between April 2011 and October 2016 was retrospectively reviewed. CW was diagnosed on CT angiograms as a membrane-like intraluminal filling defect along the posterior wall of the carotid bulb or the origin of the internal carotid artery (ICA) on oblique sagittal images and a corresponding thin septum on axial images.

RESULTS

Two patients with CWs were identified among 132 patients with suspected stroke. The prevalence of CWs among symptomatic patients with suspected stroke was 1.5%. The prevalence of asymptomatic CWs was 2.2% (7 of 312 cases). The CWs were located in the posterior wall of the carotid bulb in 7 patients and just distal to the ICA origin in 2 patients. There were no apparent differences in the location or lesion length between symptomatic and asymptomatic CWs. Four of the 7 asymptomatic CWs remained asymptomatic for at least 2 years of follow-up. Two patients with symptomatic CWs developed recurrent cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack despite being on a regimen of oral antiplatelet agents, and carotid endarterectomy was performed as radical treatment. Patients with CWs were younger than controls (median age 55 vs 69 years, p = 0.003) and were less frequently male than controls (33% vs 72%, p = 0.025). CW cases showed significantly fewer common atherosclerosis risk factors than the control group (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Although limited to CTA patients, this study reported on the prevalence and common site of CWs, focusing on symptomatic and asymptomatic Japanese patients. Extensive cross-sectional and prospective observational studies are warranted to elucidate the overall prevalence and natural history of CWs.