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Jennifer L. Quon, Lily H. Kim, Robert M. Lober, Maryam Maleki, Gary K. Steinberg and Kristen W. Yeom

OBJECTIVE

Moyamoya disease is a dynamic cerebrovascular condition that often requires vascular surveillance. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MR perfusion method that is increasingly used for stroke and other various neurovascular pathologies. Unlike perfusion-weighted MRI, ASL uses endogenous water molecules for signal and therefore obviates gadolinium use; and provides direct, not relative, quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measures. Presently, the potential role of ASL for evaluating postoperative pediatric moyamoya patients is relatively unexplored. This study investigated the role for ASL in evaluating cerebral hemodynamic changes in children who underwent revascularization surgery.

METHODS

This retrospective study examined 15 consecutive pediatric patients with moyamoya disease (n = 7) or moyamoya syndrome (n = 8) presenting between 2010 and 2014 who underwent revascularization and in whom 3T ASL was performed pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative MRI at least 3 months after revascularization procedure was used for analysis. Quantitative CBF in various vascular territories was interrogated: anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries, and basal ganglia supplied by the lenticulostriate collaterals, resulting in evaluation of 20 brain regions.

RESULTS

After revascularization, CBF in the high middle cerebral artery territory significantly increased (p = 0.0059), accompanied by a decrease in CBF to the ipsilateral lenticulostriate-supplied basal ganglia (p = 0.0053). No perfusion changes occurred in the remaining cerebral vascular territories after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

ASL-based quantitative CBF showed improved cerebral perfusion to the middle cerebral artery territory after revascularization in children with both moyamoya syndrome and disease. Reduced perfusion to the basal ganglia might reflect pruning of the lenticulostriate collaterals, potentially from effects of revascularization. ASL can quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic changes in children with moyamoya after revascularization, and it may be a useful adjunct to routine clinical MRI surveillance.

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Derek Yecies, Katie Shpanskaya, Rashad Jabarkheel, Maryam Maleki, Lisa Bruckert, Samuel H. Cheshier, David Hong, Michael S. B. Edwards, Gerald A. Grant and Kristen W. Yeom

OBJECTIVE

Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) is a common complication following the resection of posterior fossa tumors in children. The pathophysiology of PFS remains incompletely elucidated; however, the wide-ranging symptoms of PFS suggest the possibility of widespread cortical dysfunction. In this study, the authors utilized arterial spin labeling (ASL), an MR perfusion modality that provides quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow without the use of intravenous contrast, to assess cortical blood flow in patients with PFS.

METHODS

A database of medulloblastoma treated at the authors’ institution from 2004 to 2016 was retrospectively reviewed, and 14 patients with PFS were identified. Immediate postoperative ASL for patients with PFS and medulloblastoma patients who did not develop PFS were compared. Additionally, in patients with PFS, ASL following the return of speech was compared with immediate postoperative ASL.

RESULTS

On immediate postoperative ASL, patients who subsequently developed PFS had statistically significant decreases in right frontal lobe perfusion and a trend toward decreased perfusion in the left frontal lobe compared with controls. Patients with PFS had statistically significant increases in bilateral frontal lobe perfusion after the resolution of symptoms compared with their immediate postoperative imaging findings.

CONCLUSIONS

ASL perfusion imaging identifies decreased frontal lobe blood flow as a strong physiological correlate of PFS that is consistent with the symptomatology of PFS. This is the first study to demonstrate that decreases in frontal lobe perfusion are present in the immediate postoperative period and resolve with the resolution of symptoms, suggesting a physiological explanation for the transient symptoms of PFS.