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Anna MacDowall, Martin Skeppholm, Yohan Robinson and Claes Olerud

OBJECTIVE

The visual analog scale (VAS) is frequently used to measure treatment outcome in patients with cervical spine disorders. The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is the smallest change in a score that has clinical importance to the patient. Although it has been established for other medical fields, knowledge of the VAS MCID for the cervical spine is sparse, and it has rarely been considered in relation to measurement noise. The goals in this study were as follows: 1) to validate the VAS-neck and VAS-arm instruments for the cervical spine (e.g., repeatability); 2) to investigate the possible influence of predictive factors and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) score on repeatability; and 3) to compute the MCID with 5 different methods.

METHODS

A post hoc analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial with 151 patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy due to degenerative disc disease was performed. Information on age, sex, smoking habits, exercise, employment status, HADS score, and VAS-neck and VAS-arm scores was gathered before surgery and after 1 year. The VAS was applied twice on every occasion, with 15 minutes in between. Repeatability and the association with predictors and HADS score were analyzed using the 1-sample t-test, linear regression models, and Spearman correlation. The MCID was calculated with the following methods: average change, change difference, receiver operating characteristic curve, effect size, and minimum detectable change (MDC).

RESULTS

The repeatability in VAS-neck was 8.1 mm, and in VAS-arm it was 10.4 mm. Less consistent values on the VAS correlated to female sex and higher values on the HADS. For VAS-neck the MCID ranged from 4.6 to 21.4, and for VAS-arm it ranged from 1.1 to 29.1. The highest MCID came from the MDC method, which was the only method that gave values above the measurement noise in both VAS-neck and VAS-arm.

CONCLUSIONS

Measurement noise in VAS-neck and VAS-arm for the cervical spine was influenced by female sex and HADS score. The only method to compute MCID that consistently gave results above the measurement noise in VAS-neck and VAS-arm was the MDC.

Clinical trial registration no.: 44347115 (www.isrctn.com).

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Martin Skeppholm, Per Svedmark, Marilyn E. Noz, Gerald Q. Maguire Jr., Henrik Olivecrona and Claes Olerud

OBJECT

Artificial disc replacement (ADR) devices are unlike implants used in cervical fusion in that they are continuously exposed to stress not only within the implant site but also at their site of attachment to the adjacent vertebra. An imaging technique with higher accuracy than plain radiography and with the possibility of 3D visualization would provide more detailed information about the motion quality and stability of the implant in relation to the vertebrae. Such high-accuracy studies have previously been conducted with radiostereometric analysis (RSA), which requires implantation of tantalum markers in the adjacent vertebrae. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo motion and stability of implanted artificial discs. A noninvasive analysis was performed with CT, with an accuracy higher than that of plain radiographs and almost as high as RSA in cervical spine.

METHODS

Twenty-eight patients with ADR were included from a larger cohort of a randomized controlled trial comparing treatment of cervical radiculopathy with ADR or anterior cervical decompression and fusion. Surgical levels included C4–7; 18 patients had 1-level surgery and 10 patients had 2-level surgery. Follow-up time ranged from 19 to 50 months, with an average of 40 months. Two CT volumes of the cervical spine, 1 in flexion and 1 in extension, were obtained in each patient and then spatially registered using a customized imaging tool, previously used and validated for the cervical spine. Motion between the components in the artificial disc, as well as motion between the components and adjacent vertebrae, were calculated in 3 planes. Intraclass correlation (ICC) between independent observers and repeatability of the method were also calculated.

RESULTS

Intrinsic motion, expressed as degrees in rotation and millimeters in translation, was detectable in a majority of the ADRs. In the sagittal plane, in which the flexion/extension was performed, sagittal rotation ranged between 0.2° and 15.8° and translation between 0.0 and 5.5 mm. Eight percent of the ADRs were classified as unstable, as motion between at least 1 of the components and the adjacent vertebra was detected. Five percent were classified as ankylotic, with no detectable motion, and another 8% showed very limited motion due to heterotopic ossification. Repeatability for the motion in the sagittal plane was calculated to be 1.30° for rotation and 1.29 mm for translation (95% confidence level), ICC 0.99 and 0.84, respectively. All 3 patients with unstable devices had undergone 1-level ADRs at C5–6. They all underwent revision surgery due to increased neck pain, and instability was established during the surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of the artificial discs in this study showed intrinsic mobility several years after implantation and were also shown to be properly attached. Implant instability was detected in 8% of patients and, as all of these patients underwent revision surgery due to increasing neck pain, this might be a more serious problem than heterotopic bone formation.

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Anna MacDowall, Martin Skeppholm, Lars Lindhagen, Yohan Robinson, Håkan Löfgren, Karl Michaëlsson and Claes Olerud

OBJECTIVE

The long-term efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) surgery compared with fusion after decompression for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy has not previously been investigated in a population-based setting.

METHODS

All patients with cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy who were in the national Swedish Spine Registry (Swespine) beginning in January 1, 2006, were eligible for the study. Follow-up information was obtained up to November 15, 2017. The authors compared, using propensity score matching, patients treated with anterior decompression and insertion of an ADR with patients who underwent anterior decompression combined with fusion surgery. The primary outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI), a patient-reported function score ranging from 0% to 100%, with higher scores indicating greater disability and a minimum clinically important difference of > 15%.

RESULTS

A total of 3998 patients (2018:1980 women/men) met the inclusion criteria, of whom 204 had undergone arthroplasty and 3794 had undergone fusion. After propensity score matching, 185 patients with a mean age of 49.7 years remained in each group. Scores on the NDI were approximately halved in both groups after 5 years, but without a significant mean difference in NDI (3.0%; 95% CI −8.4 to 2.4; p = 0.28) between the groups. There were no differences between the groups in EuroQol–5 Dimensions or in pain scores for the neck and arm.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy, decompression plus ADR surgery did not result in a clinically important difference in outcomes after 5 years, compared with decompression and fusion surgery.

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Anna MacDowall, Martin Skeppholm, Lars Lindhagen, Yohan Robinson and Claes Olerud

OBJECTIVE

Several efforts have been made to investigate the long-term efficacy of artificial disc replacement surgery compared with that of fusion after decompression for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy. However, research on the impact of mental distress on surgical treatment outcome has been sparse. The aim of the authors was to investigate the potential predictive value of preoperative risk factors in determining long-term outcome.

METHODS

A total of 153 patients (mean age 47 years) with single- or double-level cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy were randomly assigned to undergo either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (n = 70) or artificial disc replacement (n = 83). The primary outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, a patient-reported function score that ranges from 0% to 100%; higher scores indicate greater disability. Preoperative variables such as sex, age, smoking status, employment status, having a strenuous job, neck pain duration, arm pain duration, amount of regular exercise, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) score, NDI score, whether surgery was performed on 1 or 2 levels, and allocated treatment were analyzed in multiple linear regression models with the 5-year NDI score as the outcome.

RESULTS

A total of 47 (31%) patients had either a HADS anxiety or HADS depression score of 10 points or higher. High values on the preoperative HADS were a negative predictor of outcome (p = 0.009). Treatment allocation had no effect on 5-year NDI scores (p = 0.32).

CONCLUSIONS

Preoperative mental distress measured with the HADS affects long-term outcome in surgically treated patients with cervical radiculopathy.

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Anna MacDowall, Martin Skeppholm, Lars Lindhagen, Yohan Robinson, Håkan Löfgren, Karl Michaëlsson and Claes Olerud

OBJECTIVE

The long-term efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) surgery compared with fusion after decompression for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy has not previously been investigated in a population-based setting.

METHODS

All patients with cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy who were in the national Swedish Spine Registry (Swespine) beginning in January 1, 2006, were eligible for the study. Follow-up information was obtained up to November 15, 2017. The authors compared, using propensity score matching, patients treated with anterior decompression and insertion of an ADR with patients who underwent anterior decompression combined with fusion surgery. The primary outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI), a patient-reported function score ranging from 0% to 100%, with higher scores indicating greater disability and a minimum clinically important difference of > 15%.

RESULTS

A total of 3998 patients (2018:1980 women/men) met the inclusion criteria, of whom 204 had undergone arthroplasty and 3794 had undergone fusion. After propensity score matching, 185 patients with a mean age of 49.7 years remained in each group. Scores on the NDI were approximately halved in both groups after 5 years, but without a significant mean difference in NDI (3.0%; 95% CI −8.4 to 2.4; p = 0.28) between the groups. There were no differences between the groups in EuroQol–5 Dimensions or in pain scores for the neck and arm.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with cervical degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy, decompression plus ADR surgery did not result in a clinically important difference in outcomes after 5 years, compared with decompression and fusion surgery.

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Anna MacDowall, Nuno Canto Moreira, Catarina Marques, Martin Skeppholm, Lars Lindhagen, Yohan Robinson, Håkan Löfgren, Karl Michaëlsson and Claes Olerud

OBJECTIVE

The method of artificial disc replacement (ADR) has been developed as an alternative treatment to fusion surgery after decompression for cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) with radiculopathy. Preserving the motion of ADR devices aims to prevent immobilization side effects such as adjacent-segment pathology (ASP). However, long-term follow-up evaluations using MRI are needed to investigate if this intent is achieved.

METHODS

The authors performed a randomized controlled trial with 153 patients (mean age 47 years) undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. Eighty-three patients received an ADR and 70 patients underwent fusion surgery. Outcomes after 5 years were assessed using patient-reported outcome measures using the Neck Disability Index (NDI) score as the primary outcome; motion preservation and heterotopic ossification by radiography; ASP by MRI; and secondary surgical procedures.

RESULTS

Scores on the NDI were approximately halved in both groups: the mean score after 5 years was 36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 31–41) in the ADR group and 32 (95% CI 27–38) in the fusion group (p = 0.48). There were no other significant differences between the groups in six other patient-related outcome measures. Fifty-four percent of the patients in the ADR group preserved motion at the operated cervical level and 25% of the ADRs were spontaneously fused. Seventeen ADR patients (21%) and 7 fusion patients (10%) underwent secondary surgery (p = 0.11), with 5 patients in each group due to clinical ASP.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with cervical DDD and radiculopathy decompression as well as ADR, surgery did not result in better clinical or radiological outcomes after 5 years compared with decompression and fusion surgery.

Clinical trial registration no.: 44347115 (ISRCTN).