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Lara W. Massie, Hesham Mostafa Zakaria, Lonni R. Schultz, Azam Basheer, Morenikeji Ayodele Buraimoh and Victor Chang

OBJECTIVE

The inability to significantly improve sagittal parameters has been a limitation of minimally invasive surgery for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). Traditional cages have a limited capacity to restore lordosis. This study evaluates the use of a crescent-shaped articulating expandable cage (Altera) for MIS TLIF.

METHODS

This is a retrospective review of 1- and 2-level MIS TLIF. Radiographic outcomes included differences in segmental and lumbar lordosis, disc height, evidence of fusion, and any endplate violations. Clinical outcomes included the numeric rating scale for leg and back pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for low-back pain.

RESULTS

Thirty-nine patients underwent single-level MIS TLIF, and 5 underwent 2-level MIS TLIF. The mean age was 63.1 years, with 64% women. On average, spondylolisthesis was corrected by 4.3 mm (preoperative = 6.69 mm, postoperative = 2.39 mm, p < 0.001), the segmental angle was improved by 4.94° (preoperative = 5.63°, postoperative = 10.58°, p < 0.001), and segmental height increased by 3.1 mm (preoperative = 5.09 mm, postoperative = 8.19 mm, p < 0.001). At 90 days after surgery the authors observed the following: a smaller postoperative sagittal vertical axis was associated with larger changes in back pain at 90 days (r = −0.558, p = 0.013); a larger decrease in spondylolisthesis was associated with greater improvements in ODI and back pain scores (r = −0.425, p = 0.043, and r = −0.43, p = 0.031, respectively); and a larger decrease in pelvic tilt (PT) was associated with greater improvements in back pain (r = −0.548, p = 0.043). For the 1-year PROs, the relationship between the change in PT and changes in ODI and numeric rating scale back pain were significant (r = 0.612, p = 0.009, and r = −0.803, p = 0.001, respectively) with larger decreases in PT associated with larger improvements in ODI and back pain. Overall for this study there was a 96% fusion rate.

Fourteen patients were noted to have endplate violation on intraoperative fluoroscopy during placement of the cage. Only 3 of these had progression of their subsidence, with an overall subsidence rate of 6% (3 of 49) visible on postoperative CT.

CONCLUSIONS

The use of this expandable, articulating, lordotic, or hyperlordotic interbody cage for MIS TLIF provides a significant restoration of segmental height and segmental lordosis, with associated improvements in sagittal balance parameters. Patients treated with this technique had acceptable levels of fusion and significant reductions in pain and disability.

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Hesham Mostafa Zakaria, Lonni Schultz, Feras Mossa-Basha, Brent Griffith and Victor Chang

OBJECT

Improved objective assessments of perioperative risk after spine surgery are necessary to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. Morphometric analysis has proven utility in predicting postoperative morbidity and mortality in surgical disciplines. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether morphometrics can be applied to the cases of patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of the perioperative course of 395 patients who underwent lumbar surgery at their institution from 2013 to 2014. Preoperative risk factors such as age, diabetes, smoking, coronary artery disease, and body mass index (BMI) were recorded. Preoperative MRI was used to measure the psoas muscle area at the L-4 vertebra and paraspinal muscle area at the T-12 vertebra. Primary outcomes included unplanned return to the operating room, 30- and 90-day readmissions, surgical site infection, wound dehiscence, new neurological deficit, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, urinary tract infection, urinary retention, hospital-acquired pneumonia, stroke, and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit.

RESULTS

The overall rate of adverse events was 30%, the most common event being urinary retention (12%). Greater age (p = 0.015) and tobacco usage (p = 0.026) were both significantly associated with complications for all patients, while diabetes, coronary artery disease, and high BMI were not. No surgery-related characteristics were associated with postoperative morbidity, including whether surgery required instrumentation, whether it was a revision, or the number of vertebral levels treated. Using multivariate regression analysis, male and female patients with the lowest psoas tertile had an OR of 1.70 (95% CI 1.04–2.79, p = 0.035) for having postoperative complications. Male patients in the lowest psoas tertile had an OR of 2.42 (95% CI 1.17–5.01, p = 0.016) for having a postoperative complication. The paraspinal muscle groups did not provide any significant data for postoperative morbidity, even after multivariate analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

The morphometric measurement of psoas muscle size may be a sensitive predictive tool compared with other risk factors for perioperative morbidity in male patients undergoing lumbar surgery.

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Yuxia Han, Don Seyfried, Yuling Meng, Dongmei Yang, Lonni Schultz, Michael Chopp and Donald Seyfried

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies have demonstrated that transplanted multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) improve functional recovery in rats after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In this study the authors tested the hypothesis that administration of multipotent MSC-derived exosomes promotes functional recovery, neurovascular remodeling, and neurogenesis in a rat model of ICH.

METHODS

Sixteen adult male Wistar rats were subjected to ICH via blood injection into the striatum, followed 24 hours later by tail vein injection of 100 μg protein of MSC-derived exosomes (treatment group, 8 rats) or an equal volume of vehicle (control group, 8 rats); an additional 8 rats that had identical surgery without blood infusion were used as a sham group. The modified Morris water maze (mMWM), modified Neurological Severity Score (mNSS), and social odor–based novelty recognition tests were performed to evaluate cognitive and sensorimotor functional recovery after ICH. All 24 animals were killed 28 days after ICH or sham procedure. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed for measurements of lesion volume and neurovascular and white matter remodeling.

RESULTS

Compared with the saline-treated controls, exosome-treated ICH rats showed significant improvement in the neurological function of spatial learning and motor recovery measured at 26–28 days by mMWM and starting at day 14 by mNSS (p < 0.05). Senorimotor functional improvement was measured by a social odor–based novelty recognition test (p < 0.05). Exosome treatment significantly increased newly generated endothelial cells in the hemorrhagic boundary zone, neuroblasts and mature neurons in the subventricular zone, and myelin in the striatum without altering the lesion volume.

CONCLUSIONS

MSC-derived exosomes effectively improve functional recovery after ICH, possibly by promoting endogenous angiogenesis and neurogenesis in rats after ICH. Thus, cell-free, MSC-derived exosomes may be a novel therapy for ICH.

Free access

Hesham Mostafa Zakaria, Azam Basheer, David Boyce-Fappiano, Erinma Elibe, Lonni Schultz, Ian Lee, Farzan Siddiqui, Brent Griffith and Victor Chang

OBJECTIVE

Predicting the survival rate for patients with cancer is currently performed using the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors (TNM). Identifying accurate prognostic markers of survival would allow better treatment stratification between more aggressive treatment strategies or palliation. This is especially relevant for patients with spinal metastases, who all have identical TNM staging and whose surgical decision-making is potentially complex. Analytical morphometrics quantifies patient frailty by measuring lean muscle mass and can predict risk for postoperative morbidity after lumbar spine surgery. This study evaluates whether morphometrics can be predictive of survival in patients with spinal metastases.

METHODS

Utilizing a retrospective registry of patients with spinal metastases who had undergone stereotactic body radiation therapy, the authors identified patients with primary lung cancer. Morphometric measurements were taken of the psoas muscle using CT of the lumbar spine. Additional morphometrics were taken of the L-4 vertebral body. Patients were stratified into tertiles based on psoas muscle area. The primary outcome measure was overall survival, which was measured from the date of the patient's CT scan to date of death.

RESULTS

A total of 168 patients were identified, with 54% male and 54% having multiple-level metastases. The median survival for all patients was 185.5 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 146–228 days). Survival was not associated with age, sex, or the number of levels of metastasis. Patients in the smallest tertile for the left psoas area had significantly shorter survival compared with a combination of the other two tertiles: 139 days versus 222 days, respectively, hazard ratio (HR) 1.47, 95% CI 1.06–2.04, p = 0.007. Total psoas tertiles were not predictive of mortality, but patients whose total psoas size was below the median size had significantly shorter survival compared with those greater than the median size: 146 days versus 253.5 days, respectively, HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.05–1.94, p = 0.025. To try to differentiate small body habitus from frailty, the ratio of psoas muscle area to vertebral body area was calculated. Total psoas size became predictive of mortality when normalized to vertebral body ratio, with patients in the lowest tertile having significantly shorter survival (p = 0.017). Left psoas to vertebral body ratio was also predictive of mortality in patients within the lowest tertile (p = 0.021). Right psoas size was not predictive of mortality in any calculations.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with lung cancer metastases to the spine, morphometric analysis of psoas muscle and vertebral body size can be used to identify patients who are at risk for shorter survival. This information should be used to select patients who are appropriate candidates for surgery and for the tailoring of oncological treatment regimens.

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Panayiotis N. Varelas, Lotfi Hacein-Bey, Lonni Schultz, Mary Conti, Marianna V. Spanaki and Thomas A. Gennarelli

Object

The aim of this study was to examine the variables influencing the mode and location of death in patients admitted to a neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU), including the participation of a newly appointed neurointensivist (NI).

Methods

Data from all patients admitted to a university hospital NICU were prospectively collected and compared between 2 consecutive 19-month periods before and after the appointment of an NI.

Results

One thousand eighty-seven patients were admitted before and 1279 after the NI's appointment. The withdrawal of life support (WOLS) occurred in 52% of all cases of death. Death following WOLS compared with survival was independently associated with an older patient age (OR 1.04/year, 95% CI 1.03–1.05), a higher University Hospitals Consortium (UHC) expected mortality rate (OR 1.05/%, 95% CI 1.04–1.07), transfer from another hospital (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.6–8.4) or admission through the emergency department (OR 5.3, 95% CI 2.4–12), admission to the neurosurgery service (OR 7.5, 95% CI 3.2–17.6), and diagnosis of an ischemic stroke (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.4–20.8) or intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 5.7, 95% CI 1.9–16.7). On discharge from the NICU, 54 patients died on the hospital ward (2.7% mortality rate). A younger patient age (OR 0.94/year, 95% CI 0.92–0.96), higher UHC-expected mortality rate (OR 1.01/%, 95% CI 1–1.03), and admission to the neurosurgery service (OR 9.35, 95% CI 1.83–47.7) were associated with death in the NICU rather than the ward. There was no association between the participation of an NI and WOLS or ward mortality rate.

Conclusions

The mode and location of death in NICU-admitted patients did not change after the appointment of an NI. Factors other than the participation of an NI—including patient age and the severity and type of neurological injury—play a significant role in the decision to withdraw life support in the NICU or dying in-hospital after discharge from the NICU.

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Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Stephen P. Juraschek, Lonni R. Schultz, Timothy F. Witham, Daniel M. Sciubba, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan and Ali Bydon

Object

Advocates of minimally invasive discectomy (MID) have promoted this operation as an alternative to open discectomy (OD), arguing that there may be less injury to the paraspinal muscles, decreased postoperative pain, and a faster recovery time. However, a recently published large randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing these approaches reported inferior relief of leg pain in patients undergoing MID. The authors conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate complications and improvement in leg pain in patients with radiculopathy enrolled in RCTs comparing OD to MID.

Methods

The authors performed a literature search using Medline and EMBASE of studies indexed between January 1990 and January 2011. Predetermined RCT eligibility included the usage of tubular retractors during MID, a minimum follow-up duration of 1 year, and quantification of pain with the visual analog scale (VAS). Trials that only evaluated patients with recurrent disc herniation were excluded. Data on operative parameters, complications, and VAS scores of leg pain were extracted by 2 investigators. A meta-analysis was performed assuming random effects to determine the difference in mean change for continuous outcomes and the risk ratio for binary outcomes.

Results

Six trials comprising 837 patients (of whom 388 were randomized to MID and 449 were randomized to OD) were included. The mean operative time was 49 minutes during MID and 44 minutes during OD; this difference was not statistically significant. Incidental durotomies occurred significantly more frequently during MID (5.67% compared with 2.90% for OD; RR 2.05, 95% CI 1.05–3.98). Intraoperative complications (incidental durotomies and nerve root injuries) were also significantly more common in patients undergoing MID (RR 2.01, 95% CI 1.07–3.77). The mean preoperative VAS score for leg pain was 6.9 in patients randomized to MID and 7.2 in those randomized to OD. With long-term follow-up (1–2 years postoperatively), the mean VAS score improved to 1.6 in both the MID and OD cohorts. There was no significant difference in relief of leg pain between the 2 approaches with either short-term follow-up (2–3 months postoperatively, 0.81 points on the VAS, 95% CI −4.71 to 6.32) or long-term follow-up (2.64 on the VAS, 95% CI −2.15 to 7.43). Reoperation for recurrent herniation was more common in patients randomized to the MID group (8.50% compared with 5.35% in patients randomized to the OD group), but this difference was not statistically significant (RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.92–2.66). Total complications did not differ significantly between the operations (RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.97–2.33).

Conclusions

The current evidence suggests that both OD and MID lead to a substantial and equivalent long-term improvement in leg pain. Adequate decompression, regardless of the operative approach used, may be the primary determinant of pain relief—the major complaint of many patients with radiculopathy. Incidental durotomies occurred significantly more frequently during MID, but total complications did not differ between the techniques.

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Jessin K. John, Adam M. Robin, Aqueel H. Pabaney, Richard A. Rammo, Lonni R. Schultz, Neema S. Sadry and Ian Y. Lee

OBJECTIVE

Recent studies have demonstrated that periventricular tumor location is associated with poorer survival and that tumor location near the ventricle limits the extent of resection. This finding may relate to the perception that ventricular entry leads to further complications and thus surgeons may choose to perform less aggressive resection in these areas. However, there is little support for this view in the literature. This study seeks to determine whether ventricular entry is associated with more complications during craniotomy for brain tumor resection.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent craniotomy for tumor resection at Henry Ford Hospital between January 2010 and November 2012 was conducted. A total of 183 cases were reviewed with attention to operative entry into the ventricular system, postoperative use of an external ventricular drain (EVD), subdural hematoma, hydrocephalus, and symptomatic intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH).

RESULTS

Patients in whom the ventricles were entered had significantly higher rates of any complication (46% vs 21%). Complications included development of subdural hygroma, subdural hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage, subgaleal collection, wound infection, urinary tract infection/deep venous thrombosis, hydrocephalus, and ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. Specifically, these patients had significantly higher rates of EVD placement (23% vs 1%, p < 0.001), hydrocephalus (6% vs 0%, p = 0.03), IVH (14% vs 0%, p < 0.001), infection (15% vs 5%, p = 0.04), and subgaleal collection (20% vs 4%, p < 0.001). It was also observed that VP shunt placement was only seen in cases of ventricular entry (11% vs 0%, p = 0.001) with 3 of 4 of these patients having a large ventricular entry (defined here as entry greater than a pinhole [< 3 mm] entry). Furthermore, in a subset of glioblastoma patients with and without ventricular entry, Kaplan-Meier estimates for survival demonstrated a median survival time of 329 days for ventricular entry compared with 522 days for patients with no ventricular entry (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.65–1.96; p = 0.67).

CONCLUSIONS

There are more complications associated with ventricular entry during brain tumor resection than in nonviolated ventricular systems. Better strategies for management of periventricular tumor resection should be actively sought to improve resection and survival for these patients.

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Kevin Reinard, David R. Nerenz, Azam Basheer, Rizwan Tahir, Timothy Jelsema, Lonni Schultz, Ghaus Malik, Ellen L. Air and Jason M. Schwalb

OBJECTIVE

A number of studies have documented inequalities in care and outcomes for a variety of clinical conditions. The authors sought to identify racial and socioeconomic disparities in the diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), as well as the potential underlying reasons for those disparities, which could serve as areas of focus for future quality improvement initiatives.

METHODS

The medical records of patients with an ICD-9 code of 350.1, signifying a diagnosis of TN, at the Henry Ford Medical Group (HFMG) in the period from 2006 to 2012 were searched, and clinical and socioeconomic data were retrospectively reviewed. Analyses were conducted to assess potential racial differences in subspecialty referral patterns and the specific type of treatment modality undertaken for patients with TN.

RESULTS

The authors identified 652 patients eligible for analysis. Compared with white patients, black patients were less likely to undergo percutaneous ablative procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery, or microvascular decompression (p < 0.001). However, there was no difference in the likelihood of blacks and whites undergoing a procedure once they had seen a neurosurgeon (67% vs 70%, respectively; p = 0.712). Blacks and whites were equally likely to be seen by a neurologist or neurosurgeon if they were initially seen in either the emergency room (38% vs 37%, p = 0.879) or internal medicine (48% vs 50%, p = 0.806). Among patients diagnosed (268 patients) after the 2008 publication of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the American Academy of Neurology guidelines for medical therapy for TN, fewer than 50% were on medications sanctioned by the guidelines, and there were no statistically significant racial disparities between white and black patients (p = 0.060).

CONCLUSIONS

According to data from a large database from one of the nation's largest comprehensive health care systems, there were significant racial disparities in the likelihood of a patient undergoing a procedure for TN. This appeared to stem from outside HFMG from a difference in referral patterns to the neurologists and neurosurgeons.

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Hesham Mostafa Zakaria, Michael Bazydlo, Lonni Schultz, Markian A. Pahuta, Jason M. Schwalb, Paul Park, Ilyas Aleem, David R. Nerenz, Victor Chang and for the MSSIC Investigators

OBJECTIVE

The Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MSSIC) is a statewide, multicenter quality improvement initiative. Using MSSIC data, the authors sought to identify 90-day adverse events and their associated risk factors (RFs) after cervical spine surgery.

METHODS

A total of 8236 cervical spine surgery cases were analyzed. Multivariable generalized estimating equation regression models were constructed to identify RFs for adverse events; variables tested included age, sex, diabetes mellitus, disc herniation, foraminal stenosis, central stenosis, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System (ASA) class > II, myelopathy, private insurance, anterior versus posterior approach, revision procedures, number of surgical levels, length of procedure, blood loss, preoperative ambulation, ambulation day of surgery, length of hospital stay, and discharge disposition.

RESULTS

Ninety days after cervical spine surgery, adverse events identified included radicular findings (11.6%), readmission (7.7%), dysphagia requiring dietary modification (feeding tube or nothing by mouth [NPO]) (6.4%), urinary retention (4.7%), urinary tract infection (2.2%), surgical site hematoma (1.1%), surgical site infection (0.9%), deep vein thrombosis (0.7%), pulmonary embolism (0.5%), neurogenic bowel/bladder (0.4%), myelopathy (0.4%), myocardial infarction (0.4%), wound dehiscence (0.2%), claudication (0.2%), and ileus (0.2%). RFs for dysphagia included anterior approach (p < 0.001), fusion procedures (p = 0.030), multiple-level surgery when considering anterior procedures only (p = 0.037), and surgery duration (p = 0.002). RFs for readmission included ASA class > II (p < 0.001), while preoperative ambulation (p = 0.001) and private insurance (p < 0.001) were protective. RFs for urinary retention included increasing age (p < 0.001) and male sex (p < 0.001), while anterior-approach surgery (p < 0.001), preoperative ambulation (p = 0.001), and ambulation day of surgery (p = 0.001) were protective. Preoperative ambulation (p = 0.010) and anterior approach (p = 0.002) were protective of radicular findings.

CONCLUSIONS

A multivariate analysis from a large, multicenter, prospective database identified the common adverse events after cervical spine surgery, along with their associated RFs. This information can lead to more informed surgeons and patients. The authors found that early mobilization after cervical spine surgery has the potential to significantly decrease adverse events.