Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Lily H. Kim x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Jennifer L. Quon, Lily H. Kim, Peter H. Hwang, Zara M. Patel, Gerald A. Grant, Samuel H. Cheshier and Michael S. B. Edwards

OBJECTIVE

Transnasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches constitute an essential technique for the resection of skull base tumors in adults. However, in the pediatric population, sellar and suprasellar lesions have historically been treated by craniotomy. Transnasal endoscopic approaches are less invasive and thus may be preferable to craniotomy, especially in children. In this case series, the authors present their institutional experience with transnasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches for pediatric skull base tumors.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed pediatric patients (age ≤ 18 years) who had undergone transnasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches for either biopsy or resection of sellar or suprasellar lesions between 2007 and 2016. All operations were performed jointly by a team of pediatric neurosurgeons and skull base otolaryngologists, except for 8 cases performed by one neurosurgeon.

RESULTS

The series included 42 patients between 4 and 18 years old (average 12.5 years) who underwent 51 operations. Headache (45%), visual symptoms (69%), and symptoms related to hormonal abnormalities (71%) were the predominant presenting symptoms. Improvement in preoperative symptoms was seen in 92% of cases. Most patients had craniopharyngiomas (n = 16), followed by pituitary adenomas (n = 12), Rathke cleft cysts (n = 4), germinomas (n = 4), chordomas (n = 2), and other lesion subtypes (n = 4). Lesions ranged from 0.3 to 6.2 cm (median 2.5 cm) in their greatest dimension. Gross-total resection was primarily performed (63% of cases), with 5 subsequent recurrences. Nasoseptal flaps were used in 47% of cases, fat grafts in 37%, and lumbar drains in 47%. CSF space was entered intraoperatively in 15 cases, and postoperative CSF was observed only in lesions with suprasellar extension. There were 8 cases of new hormonal deficits and 3 cases of new cranial nerve deficits. Length of hospital stay ranged from 1 to 61 days (median 5 days). Patients were clinically followed up for a median of 46 months (range 1–120 months), accompanied by a median radiological follow-up period of 45 months (range 3.8–120 months). Most patients (76%) were offered adjuvant therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

In this single-institution report of the transnasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach, the authors demonstrated that this technique is generally safe and effective for different types of pediatric skull base lesions. Favorable effects of surgery were sustained during a follow-up period of 4 years. Further refinement in technology will allow for more widespread use in the pediatric population.

Free access

Allen L. Ho, Austin Y. Feng, Lily H. Kim, Arjun V. Pendharkar, Eric S. Sussman, Casey H. Halpern and Gerald A. Grant

Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) is an intracranial diagnostic measure that has grown in popularity in the United States as outcomes data have demonstrated its benefits and safety. The main uses of SEEG include 1) exploration of deep cortical/sulcal structures; 2) bilateral recordings; and 3) 3D mapping of epileptogenic zones. While SEEG has gradually been accepted for treatment in adults, there is less consensus on its utility in children. In this literature review, the authors seek to describe the current state of SEEG with a focus on the more recent technology-enabled surgical techniques and demonstrate its efficacy in the pediatric epilepsy population.

Free access

Lily H. Kim, Jennifer L. Quon, Felicia W. Sun, Kristen M. Wortman, Maheen M. Adamson and Odette A. Harris

The impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been demonstrated in various studies with respect to prevalence, morbidity, and mortality data. Many of the patients burdened with long-term sequelae of TBI are veterans. Although fewer in number, female veterans with TBI have been suggested to suffer from unique physical, mental, and social challenges. However, there remains a significant knowledge gap in the sex differences in TBI. Increased female representation in the military heralds an increased risk of TBI for female soldiers, and medical professionals must be prepared to address the unique health challenges in the face of changing demographics among the veteran TBI population. In this review, the authors aimed to present the current understanding of sex differences in TBI in the veteran population and suggest directions for future investigations.

Restricted access

Jennifer L. Quon, Lily H. Kim, Robert M. Lober, Maryam Maleki, Gary K. Steinberg and Kristen W. Yeom

OBJECTIVE

Moyamoya disease is a dynamic cerebrovascular condition that often requires vascular surveillance. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MR perfusion method that is increasingly used for stroke and other various neurovascular pathologies. Unlike perfusion-weighted MRI, ASL uses endogenous water molecules for signal and therefore obviates gadolinium use; and provides direct, not relative, quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measures. Presently, the potential role of ASL for evaluating postoperative pediatric moyamoya patients is relatively unexplored. This study investigated the role for ASL in evaluating cerebral hemodynamic changes in children who underwent revascularization surgery.

METHODS

This retrospective study examined 15 consecutive pediatric patients with moyamoya disease (n = 7) or moyamoya syndrome (n = 8) presenting between 2010 and 2014 who underwent revascularization and in whom 3T ASL was performed pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative MRI at least 3 months after revascularization procedure was used for analysis. Quantitative CBF in various vascular territories was interrogated: anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries, and basal ganglia supplied by the lenticulostriate collaterals, resulting in evaluation of 20 brain regions.

RESULTS

After revascularization, CBF in the high middle cerebral artery territory significantly increased (p = 0.0059), accompanied by a decrease in CBF to the ipsilateral lenticulostriate-supplied basal ganglia (p = 0.0053). No perfusion changes occurred in the remaining cerebral vascular territories after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

ASL-based quantitative CBF showed improved cerebral perfusion to the middle cerebral artery territory after revascularization in children with both moyamoya syndrome and disease. Reduced perfusion to the basal ganglia might reflect pruning of the lenticulostriate collaterals, potentially from effects of revascularization. ASL can quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic changes in children with moyamoya after revascularization, and it may be a useful adjunct to routine clinical MRI surveillance.

Restricted access

Lily H. Kim, Edward H. Lee, Michelle Galvez, Murat Aksoy, Stefan Skare, Rafael O’Halloran, Michael S. B. Edwards, Samantha J. Holdsworth and Kristen W. Yeom

OBJECTIVE

Spine MRI is a diagnostic modality for evaluating pediatric CNS tumors. Applying diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to the spine poses challenges due to intrinsic spinal anatomy that exacerbates various image-related artifacts, such as signal dropouts or pileups, geometrical distortions, and incomplete fat suppression. The zonal oblique multislice (ZOOM)–echo-planar imaging (EPI) technique reduces geometric distortion and image blurring by reducing the field of view (FOV) without signal aliasing into the FOV. The authors hypothesized that the ZOOM-EPI method for spine DTI in concert with conventional spinal MRI is an efficient method for augmenting the evaluation of pediatric spinal tumors.

METHODS

Thirty-eight consecutive patients (mean age 8 years) who underwent ZOOM-EPI spine DTI for CNS tumor workup were retrospectively identified. Patients underwent conventional spine MRI and ZOOM-EPI DTI spine MRI. Two blinded radiologists independently reviewed two sets of randomized images: conventional spine MRI without ZOOM-EPI DTI, and conventional spine MRI with ZOOM-EPI DTI. For both image sets, the reviewers scored the findings based on lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence using a 5-point Likert scale. The reviewers also recorded presence of tumors. Quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of various spinal tumors were extracted. Tractography was performed in a subset of patients undergoing presurgical evaluation.

RESULTS

Sixteen patients demonstrated spinal tumor lesions. The readers were in moderate agreement (kappa = 0.61, 95% CI 0.30–0.91). The mean scores for conventional MRI and combined conventional MRI and DTI were as follows, respectively: 3.0 and 4.0 for lesion conspicuity (p = 0.0039), and 2.8 and 3.9 for diagnostic confidence (p < 0.001). ZOOM-EPI DTI identified new lesions in 3 patients. In 3 patients, tractography used for neurosurgical planning showed characteristic fiber tract projections. The mean weighted ADCs of low- and high-grade tumors were 1201 × 10−6 and 865 × 10−6 mm2/sec (p = 0.002), respectively; the mean minimum weighted ADCs were 823 × 10−6 and 474 × 10−6 mm2/sec (p = 0.0003), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Diffusion MRI with ZOOM-EPI can improve the detection of spinal lesions while providing quantitative diffusion information that helps distinguish low- from high-grade tumors. By adding a 2-minute DTI scan, quantitative diffusion information and tract profiles can reliably be obtained and serve as a useful adjunct to presurgical planning for pediatric spinal tumors.

Restricted access

Yuhao Huang, Derek Yecies, Lisa Bruckert, Jonathon J. Parker, Allen L. Ho, Lily H. Kim, Linden Fornoff, Max Wintermark, Brenda Porter, Kristen W. Yeom, Casey H. Halpern and Gerald A. Grant

OBJECTIVE

Completion corpus callosotomy can offer further remission from disabling seizures when a prior partial corpus callosotomy has failed and residual callosal tissue is identified on imaging. Traditional microsurgical approaches to section residual fibers carry risks associated with multiple craniotomies and the proximity to the medially oriented motor cortices. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) represents a minimally invasive approach for the ablation of residual fibers following a prior partial corpus callosotomy. Here, the authors report clinical outcomes of 6 patients undergoing LITT for completion corpus callosotomy and characterize the radiological effects of ablation.

METHODS

A retrospective clinical review was performed on a series of 6 patients who underwent LITT completion corpus callosotomy for medically intractable epilepsy at Stanford University Medical Center and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford between January 2015 and January 2018. Detailed structural and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained prior to and at multiple time points after LITT. In 4 patients who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), streamline tractography was used to reconstruct and evaluate tract projections crossing the anterior (genu and rostrum) and posterior (splenium) parts of the corpus callosum. Multiple diffusion parameters were evaluated at baseline and at each follow-up.

RESULTS

Three pediatric (age 8–18 years) and 3 adult patients (age 30–40 years) who underwent completion corpus callosotomy by LITT were identified. Mean length of follow-up postoperatively was 21.2 (range 12–34) months. Two patients had residual splenium, rostrum, and genu of the corpus callosum, while 4 patients had residual splenium only. Postoperative complications included asymptomatic extension of ablation into the left thalamus and transient disconnection syndrome. Ablation of the targeted area was confirmed on immediate postoperative diffusion-weighted MRI in all patients. Engel class I–II outcomes were achieved in 3 adult patients, whereas all 3 pediatric patients had Engel class III–IV outcomes. Tractography in 2 adult and 2 pediatric patients revealed time-dependent reduction of fractional anisotropy after LITT.

CONCLUSIONS

LITT is a safe, minimally invasive approach for completion corpus callosotomy. Engel outcomes for completion corpus callosotomy by LITT were similar to reported outcomes of open completion callosotomy, with seizure reduction primarily observed in adult patients. Serial DTI can be used to assess the presence of tract projections over time but does not classify treatment responders or nonresponders.