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Lewis C. Hou, Anand Veeravagu, Andrew R. Hsu and Victor C. K. Tse

✓ Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive primary brain tumors, with a grim prognosis despite maximal treatment. Advancements in the past decades have not significantly increased the overall survival of patients with this disease. The recurrence of GBM is inevitable, its management often unclear and case dependent. In this report, the authors summarize the current literature regarding the natural history, surveillance algorithms, and treatment options of recurrent GBM. Furthermore, they provide brief discussions regarding current novel efforts in basic and clinical research. They conclude that although recurrent GBM remains a fatal disease, the literature suggests that a subset of patients may benefit from maximal treatment efforts. Nevertheless, further research effort in all aspects of GBM diagnosis and treatment remains essential to improve the overall prognosis of this disease.

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Justin G. Santarelli, Vahé Sarkissian, Lewis C. Hou, Anand Veeravagu and Victor Tse

✓The brain is a privileged site of systemic cancer metastasis. The stages of the metastatic journey from the periphery to the brain are driven by molecular events that tie the original site of disease to the distant host tissue. This preference is not arbitrary but rather a directed phenomenon that includes such critical steps as angiogenesis and the preparation of the premetastatic niche. It appears that the connection between naïve brain and cancer cells is made in advance of any metastatic breach of the blood–brain barrier. This contributes to the preferential homing of cancer cells to the brain. Delineation of the guidance mechanisms and elements that influence cancer cell motility and dormancy are important for the advancement of treatment modalities aimed at the remediation of this devastating disease.

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Anand Veeravagu, Raphael Guzman, Chirag G. Patil, Lewis C. Hou, Marco Lee and Gary K. Steinberg

✓Neurosurgical interventions for moyamoya disease (MMD) in pediatric patients include direct, indirect, and combined revascularization procedures. Each technique has shown efficacy in the treatment of pediatric MMD; however, no single study has demonstrated the superiority of one technique over another. In this review, the authors explore the various studies focused on the use of these techniques for MMD in the pediatric population. They summarize the results of each study to clearly depict the clinical outcomes achieved at each institution that had utilized direct, indirect, or combined techniques. In certain studies, multiple techniques were used, and the clinical or radiological outcomes were compared accordingly.

Direct techniques have been shown to aid a reduction in perioperative strokes and provide immediate revascularization to ischemic areas; however, these procedures are technically challenging, and not all pediatric patients are appropriate candidates. Indirect techniques have also shown efficacy in the pediatric population but may require a longer period for revascularization to occur and perfusion deficits to be reversed. The authors concluded that the clinical efficacy of one technique over another is still unclear, as most studies have had small populations and the same outcome measures have not been applied. Authors who compared direct and indirect techniques noted approximately equal clinical outcomes with differences in radiological findings. Additional, larger studies are needed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for the pediatric age group.

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Lewis C. Hou, Anand Veeravagu, Andrew R. Hsu, Gregory M. Enns and Stephen L. Huhn

✓Glutaric acidemia type I (GA-I) is a rare, autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that leads to severe dystonia, basal ganglia degeneration, and bilaterally enlarged anterior middle cranial fossae. The current management of this disease includes early diagnosis with newborn screening, prevention of catabolism, carnitine supplementation, and a strict dietary protein restriction. Neurosurgical evaluation and intervention may be necessary in patients with structural lesions associated with this disease. In this report, the authors present two pediatric patients with GA-I and discuss the neurosurgical aspects of this rare medical disorder.