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Kyung Hyun Kim, Eun Hwa Choi, and Seung-Ki Kim

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Kyung Hyun Kim, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho, and Kyu-Chang Wang

OBJECTIVE

The surgical indications for some arachnoid cysts (ACs) are controversial. While surgical procedures can be effective when an AC is a definite cause of hydrocephalus or papilledema, most ACs do not cause any symptoms or signs. Some surgeons perform several procedures to treat ACs because of their large size. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term outcomes of Galassi type III ACs between surgery and nonsurgery groups.

METHODS

The medical records of 60 patients diagnosed with sylvian ACs (Galassi type III) who visited Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from July 1990 to March 2018 were analyzed. The authors compared the outcomes between those treated with surgery and those not treated with surgery.

RESULTS

Of the 60 patients, 27 patients had no symptoms, 19 patients had vague symptoms and signs associated with ACs, and the remaining 14 patients had definite AC-related symptoms and signs. Thirty-eight patients underwent surgery, and 22 patients underwent observation. Some operations were accompanied by complications. Among the 33 patients in the surgery group, excluding 5 with hydrocephalus or papilledema, 8 patients needed 18 additional operations. However, there were no patients in the nonsurgery group who needed surgical intervention during the follow-up period (mean 67.5 months), although the size of the AC increased in 2 patients. Changes in AC size were not correlated with symptom relief.

CONCLUSIONS

When patients with hydrocephalus or papilledema were excluded, there was no difference in the outcomes between the surgery and nonsurgery groups regardless of the size of the sylvian AC. Surgeons should be cautious when deciding whether to operate.

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Jung-Hee Lee, Ki-Tack Kim, Kyung-Soo Suk, Sang-Hun Lee, Bi-O Jeong, Hyun-Seok Oh, Chul-Hee Lee, and Myung-Seo Kim

Intraspinal cystic lesions with different pathogeneses have been reported to cause neurological deficits; however, no one has focused on the intraspinal extradural cysts that develop after osteoporotic compression fracture. The reported case features a 66-year-old woman presenting with progressive neurological deficit, back pain, and no history of additional trauma after undergoing conservative treatment for an osteoporotic fracture of L-1. The authors present serial radiographs and MR images demonstrating an epidural cyst successfully treated via a single posterior approach. This appears to be the first such case reported in the literature.

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Sun-Joon Yoo, Jeong-Yoon Park, Dong-Kyu Chin, Keun-Su Kim, Yong-Eun Cho, and Kyung-Hyun Kim

OBJECTIVE

Mechanical complications should be considered following the correction of multilevel posterior cervical instrumented fusion. This study aimed to investigate clinical data on the patients’ pre- and postoperative cervical alignment in terms of the incidence of mechanical complications after multilevel posterior cervical instrumented fusion.

METHODS

Between January 2008 and December 2018, 156 consecutive patients who underwent posterior cervical laminectomy and instrumented fusion surgery of 4 or more levels and were followed up for more than 2 years were included in this study. Age, sex, bone mineral density (BMD), BMI, mechanical complications, and pre- and postoperative radiographic factors were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis to investigate the factors related to mechanical complications.

RESULTS

Of the 156 patients, 114 were men and 42 were women; the mean age was 60.38 years (range 25–83 years), and the mean follow-up duration of follow-up was 37.56 months (range 24–128 months). Thirty-seven patients (23.7%) experienced mechanical complications, and 6 of them underwent revision surgery. The significant risk factors for mechanical complications were low BMD T-score (−1.36 vs −0.58, p = 0.001), a large number of fused vertebrae (5.08 vs 4.54, p = 0.003), a large preoperative C2–7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA; 32.28 vs 23.24 mm, p = 0.002), and low preoperative C2–7 lordosis (1.85° vs 8.83°, p = 0.001). The clinical outcomes demonstrated overall improvement in both groups; however, the neck visual analog scale, Neck Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores after surgery were significantly worse in the mechanical complication group compared with the group without mechanical complications.

CONCLUSIONS

Low BMD, a large number of fused vertebrae, a large preoperative C2–7 SVA, and low C2–7 lordosis were significant risk factors for mechanical complications after posterior cervical fusion surgery. The results of this study could be valuable for preoperative counseling, medical treatment, or surgical planning when multilevel posterior cervical instrumented fusion surgery is performed.

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Yun-Sik Dho, Young Jae Kim, Kwang Gi Kim, Sung Hwan Hwang, Kyung Hyun Kim, Jin Wook Kim, Yong Hwy Kim, Seung Hong Choi, and Chul-Kee Park

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to analyze the positional effect of MRI on the accuracy of neuronavigational localization for posterior fossa (PF) lesions when the operation is performed with the patient in the prone position.

METHODS

Ten patients with PF tumors requiring surgery in the prone position were prospectively enrolled in the study. All patients underwent preoperative navigational MRI in both the supine and prone positions in a single session. Using simultaneous intraoperative registration of the supine and prone navigational MR images, the authors investigated the images’ accuracy, spatial deformity, and source of errors for PF lesions. Accuracy was determined in terms of differences in the ability of the supine and prone MR images to localize 64 test points in the PF by using a neuronavigation system. Spatial deformities were analyzed and visualized by in-house–developed software with a 3D reconstruction function and spatial calculation of the MRI data. To identify the source of differences, the authors investigated the accuracy of fiducial point localization in the supine and prone MR images after taking the surface anatomy and age factors into consideration.

RESULTS

Neuronavigational localization performed using prone MRI was more accurate for PF lesions than routine supine MRI prior to prone position surgery. Prone MRI more accurately localized 93.8% of the tested PF areas than supine MRI. The spatial deformities in the neuronavigation system calculated using the supine MRI tended to move in the posterior-superior direction from the actual anatomical landmarks. The average distance of the spatial differences between the prone and supine MR images was 6.3 mm. The spatial difference had a tendency to increase close to the midline. An older age (> 60 years) and fiducial markers adjacent to the cervical muscles were considered to contribute significantly to the source of differences in the positional effect of neuronavigation (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrated the superior accuracy of neuronavigational localization with prone-position MRI during prone-position surgery for PF lesions. The authors recommend that the scan position of the neuronavigational MRI be matched with the surgical position for more precise localization.

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Kyung Hwan Kim, Doo-Sik Kong, Kyung Rae Cho, Min Ho Lee, Jung-Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol, Sung Tae Kim, Do-Hyun Nam, and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

Fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) represents a feasible option for patients with large brain metastases (BM). However, the dose-fractionation scheme balanced between local control and radiation-induced toxicity remains unclear. Therefore, the authors conducted a dose-escalation study using fractionated GKS as the primary treatment for large (> 3 cm) BM.

METHODS

The exclusion criteria were more than 3 lesions, evidence of leptomeningeal disease, metastatic melanoma, poor general condition, and previously treated lesions. Patients were randomized to receive 24, 27, or 30 Gy in 3 fractions (8, 9, or 10 Gy per fraction, respectively). The primary endpoint was the development of radiation necrosis assessed by a neuroradiologist blinded to the study. The secondary endpoints included the local progression-free survival (PFS) rate, change in tumor volume, development of distant intracranial progression, and overall survival.

RESULTS

Between September 2016 and April 2018, 60 patients were eligible for the study, with 46 patients (15, 17, and 14 patients in the 8-, 9-, and 10-Gy groups, respectively) available for analysis. The median follow-up duration was 9.6 months (range 2.5–25.1 months). The 6-month estimated cumulative incidence of radiation necrosis was 0% in the 8-Gy group, 13% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0%–29%) in the 9-Gy group, and 37% (95% CI 1%–58%) in the 10-Gy group. Being in the 10-Gy group was a significant risk factor for the development of radiation necrosis (p = 0.047; hazard ratio [HR] 7.2, 95% CI 1.1–51.4). The 12-month local PFS rates were 65%, 80%, and 75% in the 8-, 9-, and 10-Gy groups, respectively. Being in the 8-Gy group was a risk factor for local treatment failure (p = 0.037; HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1–29.6). The mean volume change from baseline was a 47.5% decrease in this cohort. Distant intracranial progression and overall survival did not differ among the 3 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

In this dose-escalation study, 27 Gy in 3 fractions appeared to be a relevant regimen of fractionated GKS for large BM because 30 Gy in 3 fractions resulted in unacceptable toxicities and 24 Gy in 3 fractions was associated with local treatment failure.

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Kyung Hwan Kim, So Jeong Kang, Jung-Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam, and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to verify the effect of proactive Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in the treatment of asymptomatic meningioma compared with the natural course without any therapeutic intervention.

METHODS

From January 2006 to May 2017, 354 patients newly diagnosed with asymptomatic meningioma were reviewed and categorized into GKS (n = 153) and observation (n = 201) groups. Clinical and radiological progression rates were examined, and changes in volume were analyzed.

RESULTS

Clinical progression (i.e., clinician-judged progression), combining symptomatic progression (n = 43) and clinician-judged increase in size using images routinely acquired (n = 34), occurred in 4 patients (2.6%) and 73 patients (36.3%) in the GKS and observation groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The clinical progression-free survival (PFS) rates in the GKS and observation groups were 98.7% and 64.6%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 92.9% and 42.7%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). The radiological tumor control rate was 94.1% in the GKS group, and radiological progression was noted in 141 patients (70.1%) in the observation group. The radiological PFS rates in the GKS and observation groups were 94.4% and 38.5%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 88.5% and 7.9%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). Young age, absence of calcification, peritumoral edema, and high T2 signal intensity were correlated with clinical progression in the observation group. Volumetric analysis showed that untreated tumors gradually increased in size. However, GKS-treated tumors shrank gradually, although transient volume expansion was observed in the first 6 months. Adverse events developed in 26 of the 195 GKS-treated patients (13.3%), including 1 (0.5%) major event requiring microsurgery due to severe edema after GKS. Peritumoral edema was related to the development of adverse events (p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS

Asymptomatic meningioma is a benign disease; however, nearly two-thirds of patients experience tumor growth and one-third of untreated patients eventually require neurosurgical interventions during watchful waiting. GKS can control tumors clinically and radiologically with high probability. Although the risk of transient adverse events exists, proactive GKS may be a reasonable treatment option when there are no comorbidities limiting life expectancy.

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Hong Joo Moon, Bong-Kyung Shin, Joo Han Kim, Jong-Hyun Kim, Taek-Hyun Kwon, Hung-Seob Chung, and Youn-Kwan Park

Intramedullary teratomas, particularly adult cervicothoracic lesions, are extremely rare. Up to now only 6 cases of intramedullary cervical teratomas have been reported in adults, and all of these were histologically mature. The authors present the case of a 35-year-old man with progressive myelopathic symptoms who was admitted through an outpatient clinic and was surgically treated. The characteristics, diagnosis, epidemiology, and treatment of cervical intramedullary teratomas in adults are also reviewed. Postoperative MR imaging showed that the tumor had been near totally removed, and severely adherent tissue remained ventrocranially with tiny focal enhancement on follow-up MR imaging. Pathological examinations revealed immature teratoma without any malignant component. Adjuvant therapy was not performed. Although no change in neurological findings and symptoms was apparent postoperatively, lesion regrowth was demonstrated on MR imaging 4 months after surgery. At 8 months postoperatively, myelopathic symptoms had developed and a huge intramedullary tumor recurred according to MR imaging. This case is the seventh reported instance of intramedullary cervical teratoma in an adult, and the first case report of the immature type with malignant features.

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Sungmi Jeon, Jee Hyeok Chung, Sukwha Kim, Seung-Ki Kim, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Kyung Hyun Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, and Byung Jun Kim

OBJECTIVE

Posterior distraction osteogenesis (DO) is widely accepted for the treatment of craniosynostosis. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the effect of DO on the cranial vault according to the age of the patient and direction of distraction.

METHODS

This was a retrospective study of patients with craniosynostosis who underwent DO in the anteroposterior direction. Postdistraction changes in intracranial volume (ICV), anteroposterior distance, biparietal distance, cranial height, and frontal bossing angle were measured using Mimics software on CT scans. Craniometric data were analyzed using a multivariate regression model.

RESULTS

Thirty-two patients (16 anterior and 16 posterior DOs) were included in the study. The mean ICV increase in the anterior and posterior DO group was 211 cm3 (range 142–281 cm3) and 214 cm3 (range 150–279 cm3), respectively. Patients who were aged 1 year or younger showed a greater percentage increase in ICV than patients older than 1 year. In the anterior DO group, a more balanced increase in both anterior and posterior anteroposterior distance was observed in patients aged 1 year or younger when compared to patients older than 1 year. In the posterior DO group, a bigger expansion and smoother contour in the posterior cranial fossa was observed in patients aged 1 year or younger.

CONCLUSIONS

Both anterior and posterior DO are effective surgical options for expanding the cranial vault in patients with craniosynostosis. Early distraction appeared to show greater morphological changes in the growing cranial vault than those predicted with the vector of distraction.

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Min Ho Lee, Kyung Hwan Kim, Kyung Rae Cho, Jung Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam, and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

Fractionated Gamma Knife surgery (FGKS) has recently been used to treat large brain metastases. However, little is known about specific volume changes of lesions during the course of treatment. The authors investigated short-term volume changes of metastatic lesions during FGKS.

METHODS

The authors analyzed 33 patients with 40 lesions who underwent FGKS for intracranial metastases of non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 25 patients with 32 lesions) and breast cancer (8 patients with 8 lesions). FGKS was performed in 3–5 fractions. Baseline MRI was performed before the first fraction. MRI was repeated after 1 or 2 fractions. Adaptive planning was executed based on new images. The median prescription dose was 8 Gy (range 6–10 Gy) with a 50% isodose line.

RESULTS

On follow-up MRI, 18 of 40 lesions (45.0%) showed decreased tumor volumes (TVs). A significant difference was observed between baseline (median 15.8 cm3) and follow-up (median 14.2 cm3) volumes (p < 0.001). A conformity index was significantly decreased when it was assumed that adaptive planning was not implemented, from baseline (mean 0.96) to follow-up (mean 0.90, p < 0.001). The average reduction rate was 1.5% per day. The median follow-up duration was 29.5 weeks (range 9–94 weeks). During the follow-up period, local recurrence occurred in 5 lesions.

CONCLUSIONS

The TV showed changes with a high dose of radiation during the course of FGKS. Volumetric change caused a significant difference in the clinical parameters. It is expected that adaptive planning would be helpful in the case of radiosensitive tumors such as NSCLCs or breast cancer to ensure an adequate dose to the target area and reduce unnecessary exposure of normal tissue to radiation.